U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 01-14-2018, 04:27 PM
 
39,454 posts, read 40,770,461 times
Reputation: 16258

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by DCforever View Post
Coal became an insignificant residential heating source because few people want it in their home.
Why would you not want this in your house?



Or this?




How about this?




This...


Maybe this?


https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQT6CVC2sOc


That last one is efm boiler, about $9K on a pallet but you only buy it once. It's labeled bio fuel because you can burn wood pellets or corn in it.


I can't prevent people's ill conceived notions about the use of anthracite coal for heat but I can help to change them . There is no data on this for a variety of reasons, e.g. coal may be the primary heat source but the other heat is listed instead in things like insurance. Based on anthracite production and my intimate knowledge of how much coal the average household uses it may be as much as 1 million households using coal for heat.

Anyone burning wood or wood pellets only has to see it in action once to convince them. Anybody that has used wood or wood pellets in the past will never go back in particular for wood. Plenty of market share to take.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 01-14-2018, 06:12 PM
 
20,728 posts, read 13,734,475 times
Reputation: 14398
Quote:
Originally Posted by guidoLaMoto View Post
I grew up in Chicago when there were no regs and everyone had coal burning furnaces. The air was fine. But some Goode-Two-Shoes saw an opportunity to win votes & power by telling us what was good for us, and naive, self-sanctimonious, highly (really partially) educated voters agreed that we peons were too stupid to know better and the die was cast for govt control of our lives.

If regs were dismissed, coal would not once again become a dominant source for home heating: it still takes active work by the home owner to keep the furnace stoked, and it can't be left unattended from day to day, so home owners would still opt for the more convenient NG or propane.

If regs for nuclear were relaxed, new plants would be built more quickly and for much less cost. Not only the safest format for energy production, they are also the most environmentally friendly-- another point ignored by TreeHuggers whose true motive is a quest for power, not to save the environment.

Just to be clear, by early part of last century and certainly by the 1950's there were residential coal burning boilers that were nearly every bit automatic as using gas or oil. They were self feeding (via magazine or stoker), and required little bother from homeowner other than ensuring supply of coal was sufficient and removing ash (once a day).


Now yes, there were scores if not hundreds of different types of boilers/coal furnaces and just as today some were better than others. But still by the 1910's or 1920's homeowners *could* leave for the 12, 24 or even 48 hours and have their boilers/furnaces running, thus come home to a warm home and hot water.


https://archive.org/stream/StandardH...ge/n1/mode/2up


https://coalpail.com/coal-forum/view...p?f=85&t=19922


In fact by the 1930's or so even steam locomotives and ships that burnt coal moved to automatic stokers.


This being all said, yes coal could be dirty and so forth. However one main reason why it fell out of use for heating was simply homeowners wanted "modern" living. By this meaning people wanted to reclaim the space in their basements or whatever currently given over to the infrastructure that supported a coal burning boiler/furnace. Coal bins, ash pits, the rows of hooks, chains and whatever else suspended from ceilings that controlled dampers and so forth.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-15-2018, 01:02 PM
 
465 posts, read 248,792 times
Reputation: 1193
Quote:
Originally Posted by thecoalman View Post
*coal stove*
What do you know about the quality and quantity of the emissions of coal-burning vs wood-burning. A quick google points to anthracite actually being cleaner than wood. But I'd rather ask a guy called thecoalman

For simplicity's sake, just think of a regular wood stove, not a super-efficient rocket stove etc.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-15-2018, 07:15 PM
 
39,454 posts, read 40,770,461 times
Reputation: 16258
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haksel257 View Post
What do you know about the quality and quantity of the emissions of coal-burning vs wood-burning. A quick google points to anthracite actually being cleaner than wood. But I'd rather ask a guy called thecoalman
That depends on what emissions. As far as PM it's not even close. Anthracite produces a small amount of very light gray fly ash most of which is going to settle in the flue pipe or the bottom of the chimney. Anthracite can be used in urban areas without any complaints form the neighbors. From experience my guess is it's even lower than oil.

One thing to keep in mind is you control the heat output with the amount of air. When comparing hand fired coal stoves to wood stoves you can put the air down to almost nothing on the coal and it's still not going to produce any soot.

It's low in sulfur but will have sulfur emissions. If you have low chimney you might get a wiff of it on humid and warm days if the wind is blowing in the right direction.

Anthracite is nearly pure carbon, high 80's to 95 percent. The CO2 emissions are high but that's the price you pay for a clean burn but that has forced air.

Here is fresh load of coal on a fire, on my larger coal boiler when starting it if I do just right I can get thin blue wisps shooting out randomly about 2 feet high.

Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 01-15-2018, 07:44 PM
 
39,454 posts, read 40,770,461 times
Reputation: 16258
Quote:
Originally Posted by Haksel257 View Post
, not a super-efficient rocket stove etc.
Most coal appliances are really efficient and that goes back 100 years for some designs. Mid 80's to low 90's percent efficiency. The reason they can have these high efficiencies is because the flue gases typically take a convoluted path and the flue pipe exit can be below the fire. Even when my Van Wert boiler is stoking coal I can put my hand on the flue pipe unless it's been going for really long time.

This can be difficult to explain, I really need to make some diagrams but this is the front door to get to the burn pot. You only open this to start it.




Do you see how there is an inner wall and and an air gap? If you look on the top of frame that black stripe is air gap. That inner wall is the boiler section you would find on any boiler. There is water sandwiched between two pieces of steel. On three sides of this boiler there is third outer wall creating an air gap between it and the boiler section. As the heat is produced there is exit hole on the top corner inside the burn chamber, those flue gases will then navigate through that air gap all the way around the three sides. In other words the water is getting heated on both sides of the two steel plates it's sandwiched between. On the third side on the back the flue pipe is a actually lower than the burn pot you see in this picture.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top