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Old 06-08-2011, 07:15 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn New York
15,540 posts, read 24,826,871 times
Reputation: 20737

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Joke Insurance View Post
That is the thing. In a dense region such as Brooklyn, it is commonplace. Out in the suburbs, it is a different story.



which really makes no sense.............at all

People buy a house for the freedom from a Landlord. Buying a house with a backyard to do things in that you couldn't ordinarily do in an apartment, like messy projects, so as to not mess the house, having a swimming pool, lounge chairs, gardening, cutting wood, whatever, you get the picture, and yes, also to dry laundry, it just makes perfect sense......ESPECIALLY places where the temperatures are extremely warm.

Of course if it is a development where you have no real backyard I can understand the no drying outside policy. But anyone with a fenced in back yard could have a clothesline.......


It is so retarded that some people get so bent out of shape to see clothes hanging on a clothesline, you would think like what you were asked to look at.
All over Europe people hang clothes even in the fronts of the buildings, they are not bothered by it at all........


we as Americans really do have serious issues....
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Old 06-12-2011, 01:32 AM
 
Location: Fairfax County, VA
3,718 posts, read 4,760,266 times
Reputation: 1454
Quote:
Originally Posted by nightcrawler View Post
[/u][/b]which really makes no sense.............at all
How so?
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Old 06-12-2011, 09:19 PM
 
Location: USA
2,774 posts, read 6,652,099 times
Reputation: 1849
We use a whirlpool gas clothes dryer and do not hang out. I think we are wasting the summer sun by not using a line, but wife won't hear of it. I would hang out in summer spring and fall (weather permitting) and use dryer on the lousy days in winter. But I don't do the laundry here at home. Maybe sonebody could tell me what dries well on the line and what dries better in a dryer.
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Old 06-12-2011, 09:38 PM
 
4,424 posts, read 5,418,179 times
Reputation: 6505
i cant stand the smell of clothes dried outside. i dry my clothes in the dryer. if i have anything with designs on it or i dont want it to shrink i hang it up in the bathroom to dry overnight.
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Old 06-17-2011, 03:05 AM
 
56 posts, read 84,113 times
Reputation: 72
Seriously? There are neighborhoods that ban drying lines outside?

TOTALLY different from Australia where the Hills Hoist - the humble outside clothesline - is a national icon. Just about everyone has one, or something similar. Even in NZ where the weather is notoriously wet and fickle, most people dry their clothes outside. Personally I have a clothes rack I dry my stuff on inside the house, but thats just because Im too lazy to run outside and pull clothes in if it rains.
I can appreciate the convenience of a dryer, but damn they suck up the juice when theres a perfectly good free energy source outside.
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Old 06-17-2011, 06:14 AM
 
Location: Cute Little Town in PA
17 posts, read 90,202 times
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In order to ditch the dryer we no longer wear as much heavy cotton clothing, such as jeans, or use conventional cotton sheets. Those items are too heavy for us to hand wash frequently (we're empty-nesters). They are also difficult to air-dry due to the challenge of getting all the water out before hanging them up. (I expect I will get a wringer washer eventually; for now I use the electric washer when I must). These cotton fabrics tend to dry stiff and if they weren't washed and rinsed very well they will retain odor. We like wool, linen, silk (blended with cotton is nice), down, and synthetic fabrics. We found these last longer than cotton clothes, hand wash more easily and thoroughly, and dry quickly (frequently in under an hour). We have indoor and outdoor racks for hanging clothes.
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Old 06-19-2011, 10:14 PM
 
Location: Holly Neighborhood, AUSTINtx
3,549 posts, read 5,276,841 times
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I hang my cloths outside because dryers are notorious for damaging garments, especially cotton. I have not had allergies that I can attribute to hanging clothes outside; I think the effect is minimal.
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Old 06-19-2011, 10:20 PM
 
Location: Holly Neighborhood, AUSTINtx
3,549 posts, read 5,276,841 times
Reputation: 2176
Quote:
Originally Posted by pythonis View Post
i cant stand the smell of clothes dried outside. i dry my clothes in the dryer. if i have anything with designs on it or i dont want it to shrink i hang it up in the bathroom to dry overnight.
Your town must stink then.

On a related note all these HOA rules against solar panels, xeriscaping, and hanging clothes outside should be seeing court challenges. Especially when you pit the green economy and using less natural resources versus what a small group of people consider "acceptable aesthetics" it becomes totally ridiculous.
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Old 06-19-2011, 10:41 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,623,131 times
Reputation: 32287
Default Dryers damage cotton?????

Quote:
Originally Posted by verybadgnome View Post
I hang my cloths outside because dryers are notorious for damaging garments, especially cotton.
I have had cotton T-shirts, underwear, and some cotton socks my entire lifetime (I am 67) and have dried them in a dryer my entire lifetime. There is absolutely no damage and all those cotton things last a long, long time. I am totally mystified as to what you are talking about.
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Old 06-19-2011, 10:47 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
14,018 posts, read 17,623,131 times
Reputation: 32287
Default Please explain about hand washing.

Quote:
Originally Posted by SueDenim View Post
In order to ditch the dryer we no longer wear as much heavy cotton clothing, such as jeans, or use conventional cotton sheets. Those items are too heavy for us to hand wash frequently (we're empty-nesters). They are also difficult to air-dry due to the challenge of getting all the water out before hanging them up. (I expect I will get a wringer washer eventually; for now I use the electric washer when I must). These cotton fabrics tend to dry stiff and if they weren't washed and rinsed very well they will retain odor. We like wool, linen, silk (blended with cotton is nice), down, and synthetic fabrics. We found these last longer than cotton clothes, hand wash more easily and thoroughly, and dry quickly (frequently in under an hour). We have indoor and outdoor racks for hanging clothes.
What is the deal about hand washing? Are you saying that you go to the enormous trouble of hand washing most of time just in order to save the miniscule amount of electricity involved? I just can't imagine that. I can, however, understand why people hang their clothes out to dry when feasible, because dryers must produce heat and producing heat is energy-expensive, especially in areas where natural gas is not available.
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