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Old 04-06-2008, 12:45 PM
 
Location: a primitive state
9,842 posts, read 20,088,671 times
Reputation: 12300

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Back when I was living in central FL a few years back we had several near misses with hurricanes. I didn't lose any trees but ended up with 4 or 5 large piles of sticks scattered throughout my large semi-rural homestead. Most of them I burned in the first season after the storms, but one I kept adding to for the better part of two years and it seemed to shrink as quickly as I added to it. (and maybe I burned that pile a couple of times, now that I think of it)

Note, this was not a compost heap but simply a bunch of sticks and branches.

Now that I live in a more urban area, I've managed to accrue another large pile of sticks and burning season is a year off now. Seems like a bad idea to send them off in the garbage truck since we don't have yard waste recycling here yet.

Does anyone else have experience with keeping a semi-permanent brush pile on their property? I don't want an enormous mess on my hands.
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Old 04-06-2008, 05:35 PM
 
Location: a primitive state
9,842 posts, read 20,088,671 times
Reputation: 12300
Sorry, I'm impatient sometimes and did my own research anyway. Though these don't exactly answer my op, this is great information.

Wild Acres - Brush Piles - Wildlife and Heritage Service (http://www.dnr.state.md.us/wildlife/wabrush.asp - broken link)

Brush Piles 101 | The Humane Society of the United States (http://www.hsus.org/wildlife/urban_wildlife_our_wild_neighbors/brush_piles_101.html - broken link)

Brush Piles for Birds

http://dnr.wi.gov/org/land/wildlife/publ/rabitat.pdf (broken link)
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Old 04-09-2008, 06:47 AM
 
Location: Deep in the Heart of Texas
1,479 posts, read 7,015,654 times
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Many years ago I read an article on the importance of brush piles as backyard wildlife habitat in the National Wildlife Federation magazine. I started a brush pile and was surprised at how quickly it became inhabited by birds, rabbits, voles, chipmunks and other creatures. In winter, the birds would roost in the brush and come in and out to visit the feeders. Three houses in three states later, we still have a brush pile and we still have lots of resident creatures.
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Old 04-09-2008, 06:56 AM
 
Location: Sugar Grove, IL
3,131 posts, read 10,481,953 times
Reputation: 1617
depending on where you live, you will end up with some type of wildlife living there. some may be welcome, others not so.
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Old 04-09-2008, 06:52 PM
 
Location: a primitive state
9,842 posts, read 20,088,671 times
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I've seen rabbits in my yard. (and armadillos)


I was trying to figure out how I could keep it from becoming something I'll have to clean up later. My main pile of branches has spread into my makeshift compost pile. Both need a bit of containment.

Unfortunately, I have this problem of getting pretty far into a project without doing the prepwork first, since my time to do anything always feels limited. So my brush pile should probably be moved and somewhat organized before too long.
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Old 04-09-2008, 07:07 PM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 2 days ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,771 posts, read 21,082,654 times
Reputation: 9358
There is a compost pile behind the apartment house I live in. A plastic garbage can covers it up to keep the smell down
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Old 04-09-2008, 08:12 PM
 
3,367 posts, read 10,040,558 times
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I put last year's Christmas tree in a corner of the back yard, on top of a pile of leaves, leaning against the fence. It's a small suburban garden, but it gives a hiding and foraging place for a few visiting birds and other wildlife. When we have fruit gone past its best, I throw it under the Christmas tree where it soon gets eaten up by birds and squirrels - I think
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