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Old 04-12-2008, 12:26 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by allforcats View Post
You might find this interesting:
a map of the lower 48 showing "hardiness zones". The site opens with those zones colored for 1990. HOWEVER, if you click on "Play", you will see how that distribution changes by 2006...
Hardiness Zone Changes at arborday.org
That was really interesting. According to that illustration, northern Idaho could be a good choice for what I'm looking for in both geography and topography and growing season. Thanks for posting the link!
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Old 04-12-2008, 12:35 PM
 
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Originally Posted by nocoldiron View Post
I have flowers almost all year-I live 14 miles from the ocean where it is warm enough to grow tomato's and corn.We have to wait till December or January to prune-it's hard to catch a dormant stage.We have to mow the lawn in the winter.
I think oceans and beaches are beautiful things. Living in coastal areas comes with a lot of perks! Oceans have a different kind of majesty to them that's completely different from a majestic moutain. I really like the coastal areas from northern California up through Oregon and Washington state. But, as much as I enjoy visiting the ocean once in awhile, I'm just not a coastal person when it comes to living year-round near one.

I love the mountains, forests, lakes, streams and wilderness. No desserts, oceans or plains. (Although, if I were to be a plains person, I think parts of South Dakota would be the right place for me.)
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Old 04-12-2008, 10:32 PM
 
Location: Jax
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Originally Posted by Simple Living View Post
Florida won't have to worry about me adding to the overcrowding. Chakra-clacking or not, I doubt I could ever live in Florida! I appreciate your suggestion, though!

It's not for everyone, that's for sure .

I was thinking more North Florida for you - which is nothing, nothing like the South Florida most people think of when they think of Florida...or Disney, it's not at all like Disney in North Florida either ! North Florida is more like Georgia or the Carolinas and it's still fairly unpopulated, except for the coasts.

But it is humid here, as pointed out. If you live inland in FL, it can be dreadful, but if you're near the coast the humidity is really only bad for about 2 months out of the year.
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Old 04-12-2008, 10:49 PM
 
1,836 posts, read 4,451,486 times
Reputation: 1228
Quote:
Originally Posted by allforcats View Post
You might find this interesting:
a map of the lower 48 showing "hardiness zones". The site opens with those zones colored for 1990. HOWEVER, if you click on "Play", you will see how that distribution changes by 2006...
Hardiness Zone Changes at arborday.org
I keep going back to this link and studying the information there. It's becoming an important factor in where I finally choose to relocate to. I've ruled out several places now based on the information, and the demonstration, on this site. Thanks again!
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Old 04-18-2008, 01:06 PM
 
Location: Log home in the Appalachians
10,512 posts, read 10,309,003 times
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I'm in southeastern Ohio, foothills of the Appalachian Mountains and in the extreme northern area of zone 6 growing area, we don't have a lot of humidity up here but we do have a good decent growing season and in this particular area our winters are not that harsh. Now mind you the Appalachian Mountains are not anything like the Rockies but during the summer and into the fall of the year they're quite beautiful and in this area where I live the people are friendly and pretty much it's a live and let live situation here, so you might consider looking into this area.
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