U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-18-2008, 05:03 PM
 
11,961 posts, read 12,816,480 times
Reputation: 2772

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by NewAgeRedneck View Post
IMO those who most exemplify a green consciousness are those who find ways to CUT consumption rather than buying more gadgets, green or not..
You rotten hound YOU! You're deliberately undermining our presidents economic stimulous plan!!! flip floppin scoundrel! hahahahaa
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-19-2008, 09:38 AM
 
Location: Wherabouts Unknown!
7,764 posts, read 16,843,278 times
Reputation: 9316
harborlady wrote:
You rotten hound YOU! You're deliberately undermining our presidents economic stimulous plan!!! flip floppin scoundrel! hahahahaa
Here's a sobering post that focuses on a type of overconsumption that is very prevalent in Colorado: click ( #761 ) to read
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-03-2014, 03:58 AM
 
Location: Pittsburgh
3,141 posts, read 2,811,468 times
Reputation: 2852
Organic food products. The manufacturing, packaging, and delivery are the same and not green - gas, electric, plastics, etc. In some cases, the organic ingredients are the same as the non-organic. The only difference is people pay more for the organic label.

This hit home when I spent $6+ for a cup of coffee at a trendy shop. I sat there while the new age tribal music played and realized a bunch of college kids just served me an overpriced Sheetz coffee. I stared at the case of bagels, cupcakes, and other baked items and knew the employees would be throwing them out the same as any other restaurant. As I sipped my coffee among the patrons on their cell phones and laptops it came to me that the movement was all bs.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-03-2014, 07:39 AM
 
Location: East of Seattle since 1992, originally from SF Bay Area
29,553 posts, read 54,124,435 times
Reputation: 30779
Quote:
Originally Posted by sean98125 View Post
Some dishwashers, like Bosch, don't even have heating elements - they let the residual heat from the wash cycle dry the dishes.
Our new LG does that too. When our old one died we probably used at least 15 gallons to do the dishes, in fact just filling the sink with soapy water uses that much, never mind the rinsing.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-03-2014, 09:50 AM
 
Location: The analog world
17,087 posts, read 9,809,986 times
Reputation: 22738
Scrupulous attention to portion size, especially meat & dairy products, which cannot be composted for the most part; physically scraping dishes before placing them into the dishwasher to eliminate the need for rinsing; and running full but not crowded loads in an Energy Star rated appliance will dramatically reduce water use for cleaning dishes. You can waste water and energy washing up after meals either way. The important thing is to approach the task conscientiously.

Last edited by randomparent; 10-03-2014 at 09:59 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-03-2014, 10:34 AM
 
7,281 posts, read 8,838,769 times
Reputation: 11419
It isn't all that hard. Put a bucket in the sink. Rinse water goes in that. That goes out into the garden or if not suitable for the food cycle, out somewhere else, anywhere but the drain.

If you must, get a "green" bucket to feel real good about it.

Energy efficient dish washers are a joke and the epitome of ignorance about conserving anything. It takes no energy other than yourself to wash dishes. You get that energy from the food you eat.

Every dish washer made uses energy that must be generated and supplied by the power companies and that is dirty.

The Green Groupies rarely stop to think the entire length of the energy utilization chain. If you plug it in, it is dirty and that includes Teslas. If you want to talk about degrees of dirty, that is semantics and a way to join the love fest of being green.

If you are scraping plates before you put them in the dish washer I can't help but laugh. Just think about what you're doing. Think real hard.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-03-2014, 11:00 AM
 
Location: The analog world
17,087 posts, read 9,809,986 times
Reputation: 22738
Must you ridicule every contribution to the Green Living forum, Mack? I don't appreciate your tone, and the "think real hard" comment is obnoxious. I don't claim to be perfect. I make a little bit of progress in some areas, while others have room for improvement. That's not hypocrisy. It's an effort, which is more than many others even attempt. Let me just say that I'm astonished that you would diminish my comment and declare it so easy to use a dishpan and empty it into the garden (which I do regularly, btw) while bloviating endlessly about bringing a reusable bag to the grocery.

Last edited by randomparent; 10-03-2014 at 11:17 AM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-03-2014, 11:13 AM
 
Location: Volcano
12,971 posts, read 23,551,507 times
Reputation: 10574
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mack Knife View Post
It isn't all that hard. Put a bucket in the sink. Rinse water goes in that. That goes out into the garden or if not suitable for the food cycle, out somewhere else, anywhere but the drain.
On average up to date dishwashers use less water than handwashing does, and leave the dishes cleaner.

Quote:
Energy efficient dish washers are a joke and the epitome of ignorance about conserving anything. It takes no energy other than yourself to wash dishes. You get that energy from the food you eat.
But besides doing a better job cleaning dishes, it's also about saving time and effort. Put the dishes in the dishwasher and start it, and you can go do something else.

Quote:
Every dish washer made uses energy that must be generated and supplied by the power companies and that is dirty.
Everything is a balance. You can save a lot of energy if you turn off all the lights and just stumble around in the dark instead. But that isn't the point. The point is to use the energy you do use wisely. Everything in balance.

Quote:
The Green Groupies rarely stop to think the entire length of the energy utilization chain. If you plug it in, it is dirty and that includes Teslas. If you want to talk about degrees of dirty, that is semantics and a way to join the love fest of being green.
Who are these Green Groupies you keep ranting about? I've never met one, and never even heard of them before you started bashing them here. And btw, what do you call people who just mindlessly waste energy and other resources and pay no attention at all to the environment?

Quote:
If you are scraping plates before you put them in the dish washer I can't help but laugh. Just think about what you're doing. Think real hard.
Now you're seriously off the rails in trying to find fault in others. Of course everyone scrapes food scraps off the plates before they wash them, no matter how they wash them. You have reached new heights... urrr... depths with this one.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-03-2014, 11:30 AM
 
7,281 posts, read 8,838,769 times
Reputation: 11419
Quote:
Originally Posted by randomparent View Post
Must you ridicule every contribution to the Green Living forum, Mack? I don't appreciate your tone, and the "think real hard" comment is obnoxious. I don't claim to be perfect. I make a little bit of progress in some areas, while others have room for improvement. That's not hypocrisy. It's an effort, which is more than many others even attempt. Let me just say that I'm astonished that you would diminish my comment and declare it so easy to use a dishpan and empty it into the garden (which I do regularly, btw) while bloviating endlessly about bringing a reusable bag to the grocery.
Why do you think my comment was directed at you? Think about that.

BTW, it wasn't. I was pointing out a fact and that fact is that using a dish washer is hardly efficient in any terms except convenience. People trade convenience for energy and then use terms like energy efficient to hide the fact that it is using it. Like clean diesel, cleaner gasoline and the list goes on and on.

It is easy to use a dish pan and far more green than any dish washer made. Can you argue that?

We didn't have all the environmental problems not so long ago as we do now. Of course, everyone didn't have a dish washer, TVs in every room, heated pools, all electric this and that either.

While there is nothing wrong with using the most energy efficient products available, it is folly to think using any of them contributes to a better environment. Therein rests the hypocrisy.

Don't fall into the "D" trap of thinking everything said is about you or me or anyone else. It is about being green in general and realizing the facade it has come to be. The "D" trap in case you don't know if when someone follows you around making sure they post right after you do because they are fixated on you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-03-2014, 11:48 AM
 
Location: The analog world
17,087 posts, read 9,809,986 times
Reputation: 22738
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mack Knife View Post
Why do you think my comment was directed at you? Think about that.
Because I introduced scraping dishes to the thread, and your post immediately followed mine. The relevant parts in both of our posts are quoted below.

Quote:
Originally Posted by randomparent View Post
Scrupulous attention to portion size, especially meat & dairy products, which cannot be composted for the most part; physically scraping dishes before placing them into the dishwasher to eliminate the need for rinsing; and running full but not crowded loads in an Energy Star rated appliance will dramatically reduce water use for cleaning dishes. You can waste water and energy washing up after meals either way. The important thing is to approach the task conscientiously.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mack Knife View Post
If you are scraping plates before you put them in the dish washer I can't help but laugh. Just think about what you're doing. Think real hard.
So you can deny that your post was directed at me all you like, but the evidence proves otherwise.

I don't follow you around, Mack, but I do read and post to the Green Living forum, so you're hardly unknown to me. Furthermore, your comments are near universally negative and critical of other poster's thoughts and ideas.

Last edited by randomparent; 10-03-2014 at 01:04 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top