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Old 04-29-2008, 09:02 PM
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,766 posts, read 21,046,187 times
Reputation: 9342

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Honda Insight tops the latest government auto fuel economy list, with 60 miles per gallon in the city and 66 mpg on the highway.

The competitor hybrid Toyota Prius was second with 60 mpg in the city and 51 on the highway

The automatic version of the Dodge Ram pickup, which gets 9 mpg in the city and 12 mpg on the highway, was the least fuel-efficient vehicle in this year's survey.

Government says 66-mpg Honda Insight is most fuel-efficient car: South Florida Commuter Services - 1800234ride.com (Carpooling, Vanpooling, Transit) (http://www.1800234ride.com/template.php?sec=15&id=67 - broken link)
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Old 04-29-2008, 09:23 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,373 posts, read 37,625,046 times
Reputation: 22487
Oh, that's sad. I have a 1997 Dodge Ram 2500 Cummins Turbo diesel, with almost 300,000 miles on it (297 and change), that still wants to go on a road trip to Alaska every time we get out on the highway, and it gets 22 mpg loaded, unloaded, towing, or whatever. Too bad that they've reduced the mpg so drastically.
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Old 04-29-2008, 10:49 PM
 
Location: The beautiful Rogue Valley, Oregon
7,225 posts, read 15,241,910 times
Reputation: 9378
Honda discontinued the Insight in early 2006 - that must be a pretty old list.
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Old 04-30-2008, 02:34 AM
 
6,760 posts, read 10,396,408 times
Reputation: 2996
Funny that people talk about American manufacturers and their bad MPG, but outside of the Dodge Ram, in the truck world the imports drink gas at least as bad as their competitors. Look at the Titan and Tundra. Both of them are as bad or worse than Ford or Chevy when it comes to trucks.

Funny the larger motors in trucks of old days did just as well. I had a 1977 ford with a 351 V-8 that got 14 MPG. Would have gotten even better if I had done a few things differently under the hood.

With gas prices, you can bet truck sales will go down for the least fuel efficient models.
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Old 04-30-2008, 07:25 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,373 posts, read 37,625,046 times
Reputation: 22487
That's one reason (among many) that I'm holding on to the Dodge Ram. I need it for hauling hay and feed, for towing things, for barreling across the pasture showing properties - and the mileage is very good for something that big and useful. Looking for something smaller for every day driving, though. Thinking Toyota, because my experience with Toyotas has been that they're just as durable as the Dodge, and will keep on going until you run them into something (or, rather, your teenage son does).
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Old 06-12-2008, 08:02 PM
 
Location: Lake Norman, NC
7,179 posts, read 11,177,547 times
Reputation: 30729
Wow, if my Dodge Ram Quad Cab got MPG that low, I'd have to buy a scooter or good walking shoes.

My truck gets 20mpg highway (at 70-75 mph) and 15 mpg around town. It is a completely factory truck with a gas engine / auto tranny & working a/c! The only things I've done to it since new are oil changes, tire replacement, and I added a hard bed cover. It can use a good tune-up, so I know I can improve mpg's a little more.

Studies, schmuddies! I love when experts do these studies and they have no reality to them.
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Old 06-12-2008, 10:18 PM
 
2,348 posts, read 3,908,029 times
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They were talking with the v8, not the diesel.
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Old 06-17-2008, 09:16 AM
 
Location: Apex, NC
1,341 posts, read 5,627,842 times
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We have a horse farm and for hauling, I felt the need to trade in my Ram Hemi in and upgrade to a 2008 Ford F-350 with the new ultra-low-sulfur diesel engine. This was before diesel went up to $4.60/gallon, obviously It would be insanity to use it as a daily driver; at best I get 13mpg. I've got the Lariat package with the 20" bling rims, so it might be the tires that drop my mpg. I've heard others with new F-350s are getting 19mpg but I've also known people to exaggerate their MPG, so I'm not sure. If these monster "upscale" rims are a problem then it seems to me that the industry should stop offering them - as a means of self policing - to increase their fleet averages. In reality, I didn't "need" the F-350. I enjoy hauling with the truck (it's beautiful, comfortable and very capabale) but it's much less cost effective than my old Ram Hemi and of course the payment is much higher.

We have a 2005 Toyota Prius that has over 62,000 miles on it and its been a great car. I get 48mpg in country/city mixed driving. When Diesel hit $4/gallon I stopped making grain runs with my truck and I now make them with my Prius instead I can get six 50 pound bags in the back no problem, ten if I drop the rear seats, and at 48mpg both ways the 10 mile round trip I use about 1/5th of a gallon of fuel, compared to almost 1 gallon with my F-350

I've traveled Europe touring horse farms and one thing that always struck me were the cars and light duty trucks that were used to haul horses. Heck, in flatlands like Germany and Holland, the most common vehicle I saw pulling horses were diesel VW station wagons that got great mileage (30-40+). No they couldn't accelerate as fast, and no they couldn't brake as fast, but they definitely got the job done with super light Brenderup horse trailers that could easily fit 17+ hand horses. The Brenderups have neat surge braking systems that didn't require a electrical hookup for braking and essentially slowed itself down during deceleration. Not practical for the mountains but for many flatlanders it would work just fine.

Here in U.S., consumer demand helps direct what solutions are offered, but with the price of fuel being what it is (and not likely going much down below $4/gallon ever again), I hope we as consumers will have more choices available to us. Right now when I go to a horse show, I see alot of 3/4 ton trucks pulling two horses, and the reality is, a 1/2 ton truck could do the job with a lighter trailer. And in the flatlands, someone with a VW diesel Jetta could easily be pulling their horse to shows using something like a Brenderup trailer and saving lots of money by massively reducing fuel consumption by not having a truck as a daily driver.

Sean
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Old 05-24-2009, 10:18 AM
 
23,703 posts, read 11,766,784 times
Reputation: 9969
The Honda Insight; A Piece Of Green Junk
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Old 05-24-2009, 10:33 AM
 
23,703 posts, read 11,766,784 times
Reputation: 9969
Quote:
Originally Posted by seanpecor View Post
We have a horse farm and for hauling, I felt the need to trade in my Ram Hemi in and upgrade to a 2008 Ford F-350 with the new ultra-low-sulfur diesel engine. This was before diesel went up to $4.60/gallon, obviously It would be insanity to use it as a daily driver; at best I get 13mpg. I've got the Lariat package with the 20" bling rims, so it might be the tires that drop my mpg. I've heard others with new F-350s are getting 19mpg but I've also known people to exaggerate their MPG, so I'm not sure. If these monster "upscale" rims are a problem then it seems to me that the industry should stop offering them - as a means of self policing - to increase their fleet averages. In reality, I didn't "need" the F-350. I enjoy hauling with the truck (it's beautiful, comfortable and very capabale) but it's much less cost effective than my old Ram Hemi and of course the payment is much higher.

We have a 2005 Toyota Prius that has over 62,000 miles on it and its been a great car. I get 48mpg in country/city mixed driving. When Diesel hit $4/gallon I stopped making grain runs with my truck and I now make them with my Prius instead I can get six 50 pound bags in the back no problem, ten if I drop the rear seats, and at 48mpg both ways the 10 mile round trip I use about 1/5th of a gallon of fuel, compared to almost 1 gallon with my F-350

I've traveled Europe touring horse farms and one thing that always struck me were the cars and light duty trucks that were used to haul horses. Heck, in flatlands like Germany and Holland, the most common vehicle I saw pulling horses were diesel VW station wagons that got great mileage (30-40+). No they couldn't accelerate as fast, and no they couldn't brake as fast, but they definitely got the job done with super light Brenderup horse trailers that could easily fit 17+ hand horses. The Brenderups have neat surge braking systems that didn't require a electrical hookup for braking and essentially slowed itself down during deceleration. Not practical for the mountains but for many flatlanders it would work just fine.

Here in U.S., consumer demand helps direct what solutions are offered, but with the price of fuel being what it is (and not likely going much down below $4/gallon ever again), I hope we as consumers will have more choices available to us. Right now when I go to a horse show, I see alot of 3/4 ton trucks pulling two horses, and the reality is, a 1/2 ton truck could do the job with a lighter trailer. And in the flatlands, someone with a VW diesel Jetta could easily be pulling their horse to shows using something like a Brenderup trailer and saving lots of money by massively reducing fuel consumption by not having a truck as a daily driver.

Sean
I prefer reliability over economy. We have 2 diesel trucks, one 05 Chev with the Duramax diesel and it does okay on the highway, maybe 18 mpg. My wife usually drives that one since the Allison tranny is virtually bulletproof.

I drive my 02 Dodge diesel with the then available high output engine with the 6-spd manual tranny. I have the trip package and its not uncommon to see it tell me its getting 24 mpg at 65 mph.

We also have a 73 International Harvester Scout II 4X4 without all that pollution crap on it with a 304 V-8. I don't care what mileage it gets.

We also have a 73 Jeep J20 p/u 4X4 with the 360 V-8 and manual tranny. That truck just runs and runs.............but rotten mileage, but who cares. Its a ranch truck that I haul water in.

A 99 Jeep Grand Cherokee Laredo Limited with the 4.7 V-8 4X4. Thats our Sunday-go-to-meeting vehicle. Gets about 22mpg.

All our vehicles are super reliable and have no desire to replace them anytime soon. Especially from Government Motors.
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