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Old 05-23-2008, 08:10 PM
 
Location: Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania USA
2,308 posts, read 2,144,663 times
Reputation: 369

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Quote:
Originally Posted by mommabear2 View Post
Good question...

I've heard that producing paper trash bags consume more energy to produce than the plastic. I don't know of a 13 gallon trash bag that would be "green." I haven't thought of a way around that yet. I've heard that the plastic garbage bags degrade in about 5 years???? I use just the trash bin for the bathroom w/o the bags, and wipe them down... and I use the plastic 13 gallon bags - I recycle, have a compost bin, so I don't go through them too fast. Hoping that there will be a better option someday if there isn't already...
Production costs not withstanding, the resources for plastics are finite, natural gas and petroleum. Whereas, the resource for paper are infinite as paper, paperboard and paper products can be made from sources other than wood and wood fibers. For example, hemp is an excellent source of paper and was used by the Egyptians to make parchment over 4000 years ago, but the pinheads in political circles wont allow for the US production of hemp because of possible marijuana products, so the US in its small minded stupidity continues to cut down trees so that we can clean our butts! Hemp is grown in may parts of the world and is used for many products including paper, cloth and personal products such as oils, shampoo and soaps.

Here is an informative page link concerning the uses of hemp:

Industrial Hemp Facts, Hemp Uses, and Hemp Myths
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Old 05-24-2008, 11:01 AM
 
Location: Pahrump, NV
329 posts, read 965,023 times
Reputation: 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by Steve Hazzard View Post
When I see photos or video of landfills, the most obvious contents is plastic trash bags, you know, the 13 gallon white kitchen and the green 30 gallon plus variety. My understanding is that these plastic trash bags take many years to degrade in a landfill or anywhere else they may be thrown. Would it be possible for the paper industry to come up with a paper waterproof trash bag to replace the plastic trash bags? We've all seen the paper leaf bags (those areas with trees) that are used to collect and contain leaves in the fall. These leaf bags are taken to a composting site to be tuned into mulch and compost. Why not use a similar approach with paper garbage bags in landfills? The paper bag could be given a waterproof coating that would resist water degradation while in use, but would quickly degrade in a landfill environment to speed up the breakdown of the contents. And of course, the paper garbage bags could be made out of recycled pre and post-consumer paper waste such as newspapers and cardboard. Any thoughts on this green living idea?
We use canvas bags, much sturdier, can be washed...and we're not polluting the environment or cutting down a cazillion trees....it was one of the first steps we did to try to be "greener"....it's not always easy, and there are times the bags get left at the front door rather than brought to the store....but any plastic bags we use we use to line our smaller trash cans.

I don't know what the solution is between paper/plastic....each has their downfall
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Old 05-24-2008, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania USA
2,308 posts, read 2,144,663 times
Reputation: 369
Quote:
Originally Posted by tekape View Post
We use canvas bags, much sturdier, can be washed...and we're not polluting the environment or cutting down a cazillion trees....it was one of the first steps we did to try to be "greener"....it's not always easy, and there are times the bags get left at the front door rather than brought to the store....but any plastic bags we use we use to line our smaller trash cans.

I don't know what the solution is between paper/plastic....each has their downfall
Thanks for making an effort! I use paper grocery bags to line my small trash cans, I try to avoid plastic as much as possible, but as you mentioned, it's not easy. US society revolves around plastics in all forms and uses.
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Old 05-24-2008, 12:55 PM
 
Location: In The Outland
6,023 posts, read 11,909,801 times
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I take the whole cardboard boxes that my neighbors toss into our dumpster and use them as trash cans then they go back into the dumpster full of trash. There is no formal recycling in our area.
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Old 05-24-2008, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania USA
2,308 posts, read 2,144,663 times
Reputation: 369
Quote:
Originally Posted by rickers View Post
I take the whole cardboard boxes that my neighbors toss into our dumpster and use them as trash cans then they go back into the dumpster full of trash. There is no formal recycling in our area.
Thanks for making the effort! I think you'll find that you're ahead of the curve as recycling is becoming an important cog in the conservation of finite resources.
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Old 05-24-2008, 05:36 PM
 
Location: West Virginia
12,447 posts, read 31,530,567 times
Reputation: 8151
Steve how old are you...I remember this topic in ALL the papers when they first started using plastic bags!!!
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Old 05-24-2008, 06:18 PM
 
2,790 posts, read 5,703,209 times
Reputation: 1927
If given a choice, I prefer paper to plastic because trees are renewable. The only thing the drives me crazy about using trees for paper is the amount of junk mail that comes into my house. Not a day goes by that we don't recieve half a dozen or more credit card applications from banks we've never even heard of. But they don't even end up in land fill. We shred them and use them in our compost, the worms love it! I think it is high time that big business be made responsible for what they contribute to waste, in every sense of the word. Our grocery store is realizing the cost of using paper and plastic. They are now offering for a nominal amount, a reuseable bag. They are really nice, have nice wide handles that don't cut into your hands, and pockets inside and out for greeting cards or prescriptions. And they are very roomy, I cannot believe how much stuff we could pack in them. They even have a flat bottom so jars and cans don't fall over. I can't find a tag, but I suspect they are made from some recycled material. I have three and I plan on getting at least three more. I am fortunate that the plastic bags that do make their way into my house can be recycled along with cardboard, bottles and cans.
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Old 05-24-2008, 06:28 PM
 
Location: Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania USA
2,308 posts, read 2,144,663 times
Reputation: 369
Quote:
Originally Posted by Katie1 View Post
Steve how old are you...I remember this topic in ALL the papers when they first started using plastic bags!!!
Check out my public profile! I can remember when we used sackcloth for trash bags!
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Old 05-24-2008, 06:47 PM
 
Location: Wilkes-Barre, Pennsylvania USA
2,308 posts, read 2,144,663 times
Reputation: 369
Quote:
Originally Posted by MICoastieMom View Post
If given a choice, I prefer paper to plastic because trees are renewable. The only thing the drives me crazy about using trees for paper is the amount of junk mail that comes into my house. Not a day goes by that we don't recieve half a dozen or more credit card applications from banks we've never even heard of. But they don't even end up in land fill. We shred them and use them in our compost, the worms love it! I think it is high time that big business be made responsible for what they contribute to waste, in every sense of the word. Our grocery store is realizing the cost of using paper and plastic. They are now offering for a nominal amount, a reuseable bag. They are really nice, have nice wide handles that don't cut into your hands, and pockets inside and out for greeting cards or prescriptions. And they are very roomy, I cannot believe how much stuff we could pack in them. They even have a flat bottom so jars and cans don't fall over. I can't find a tag, but I suspect they are made from some recycled material. I have three and I plan on getting at least three more. I am fortunate that the plastic bags that do make their way into my house can be recycled along with cardboard, bottles and cans.
Good post, good post, thanks! I use reusable plastic bags with handles from Aldi's Market for my shopping bags, even though I don't shop at Aldi's, which BTW, is an international grocery and foodstuffs distributor and big here in PA, don't know about the rest of the country, too lazy to go to their web site and find out! The regular plastic bags are 10 cents each and about twice the size of a regular thin film grocery bag, and are made of heavy gauge plastic and will last a fair amount of uses, depending upon the contents of the bag. Aldi's also has an insulated bag, same dimensions as the regular bag, for 99 cents and does a good job of keeping the contents hot or cold. When worn out, I use the Aldi bags to hold my recyclable for carrying to the recycling room as I live in a senior hi-rise apartment building. When the bags are totally reduced to molecules of plastic, the also go into the big recycling bin.
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Old 05-24-2008, 07:05 PM
 
2,790 posts, read 5,703,209 times
Reputation: 1927
We have Aldi's here in SE Michigan. They started somewhere in Ohio. The bags I use are from Meijer's. Meijer's started in Western Michigan and has expanded into Northern Ohio and possibly Indiana. It is like a Wal-Mart Super Center or a Super K-Mart, although I think it is higher quality.
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