U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 05-07-2014, 11:26 PM
 
Location: Springfield, Ohio
12,201 posts, read 10,438,641 times
Reputation: 11220

Advertisements

...but plastic bags take much longer to degrade, tearing into smaller and smaller pieces, and often being consumed by and poisoning wildlife. Better to use biodegradable plastic bags, or no bag at all, for your trash, and reusable bags at the supermarket.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 05-08-2014, 07:30 PM
 
Location: The analog world
17,086 posts, read 9,894,083 times
Reputation: 22750
Realizing that this is a resurrected thread from 2008, I'll bite, because this is an issue near and dear to my heart. One doesn't typically need a trash bag if landfill waste is kept to a bare minimum and placed clean & dry into the receptacle. Any food waste can go into an outdoor compost pile, but the best option is just to eat what you purchase and prepare, so there's little left to discard.

See my album for a photo that shows how our family shops with reusables to reduce our household waste stream.

Last edited by randomparent; 05-08-2014 at 08:51 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2016, 02:16 AM
 
32 posts, read 14,530 times
Reputation: 11
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mooseketeer View Post
I am sure it is possible but I think the best solution is to stop our dependence on plastic or paper bags. A lot of places in the UK now offer free canvas bags which are re-usable and permanent and easy to use.

Irish supermarkets'stores etc... started to charge for plastic bags and virtually nobody in Eire now uses plastic bags. Britain is thinking of doing the same and I think it's an excellent idea.

We need to reduce packaging and throw-away bags are part of that culture. A lot of places here for example now use corn starch packaging for food products which looks just like plastic and is completely bio-degradable.

Coming up with new bio-degradable products is great but even better would be for us to start behaving more responsibly and less wastefully.
prevention is better than cure, i like your idea of less dependency on plastic bags and therefore less waste plastic recycle is required, if we use less bags.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2016, 03:38 AM
 
Location: 49th parallel
2,626 posts, read 1,374,094 times
Reputation: 5441
I love this thread! There are always more ways to help the environment. Does anyone remember the old Blondie and Dagwood comics where Blondie put Dagwood's lunch on the kitchen counter for him to take - wrapped up in newspaper and tied as a nice package, alongside an identical newspaper-wrapped package which was actually the kitchen garbage, and he took the garbage to work instead of his lunch.

Anyhoo, how about wrapping in newspaper? Does no one take the paper anymore? Probably not. I don't either, and this wouldn't solve my main problem anyway, because my main problem with the garbage is that it starts to stink after awhile and before pickup, and normally plastic bags solved that problem. We compost everything, but one can't put fish skins (notoriously stinky), bones, fat, etc., in the compost so there will always be something to go into the regular garbage that can rot and cause odors. We don't leave our cans outside because of raccoons, so they sit in the garage.

We also have a small place in the UK where they provide biodegradeable bags for food waste. This is good, but still, they only pick this up once a week. So I place the small filled food waste bags into the freezer until pickup time, when I haul them out and dump into the pickup bin. Lately I have started doing this in the U.S., too (putting the uncompostable stinky stuff in the freezer until pickup) but again in the U.S. it is in a plastic bag. And all my other stuff is in one, too.

We as governments need a gargantuan re-think.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-09-2016, 05:31 AM
 
Location: Canada
5,765 posts, read 4,188,283 times
Reputation: 15520
Plastic vs Paper? You think paper is better? Not so fast...

When I was young, we only used paper bags for our groceries. This was at a time when the logging industry was simple and they didn't have huge machines to hack down whole forests. Greed created clear cutting instead of selective logging and to keep up with the demand for paper and wood products. Clear cutting is not only an eyesore. Animals depend on those forests to live and the earth needs forests/green areas for oxygen.

Then they came up with plastic bags and paper went by the wayside. I used to use plastic until I became educated about their effects on the environment. I use my recycle bags for groceries and keep my use of plastic bags to a minimum.

So: paper degrades but whole forests are lost, and take years to regrow. Plastic is worse.. more use of oil, they don't degrade and our landfills are overflowing with it.

What's the solution? I believe that biodegradable bags are the only way to go as long as they are made from recycled products that are already available and the chemicals needed to manufacture them aren't harmful to the environment. They need to be strong enough to handle moisture, or the average consumer won't use them if plastic is still available.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-10-2016, 04:07 PM
 
16,673 posts, read 14,110,185 times
Reputation: 20620
Quote:
Originally Posted by gouligann View Post
Plastic vs Paper? You think paper is better? Not so fast...

When I was young, we only used paper bags for our groceries. This was at a time when the logging industry was simple and they didn't have huge machines to hack down whole forests. Greed created clear cutting instead of selective logging and to keep up with the demand for paper and wood products. Clear cutting is not only an eyesore. Animals depend on those forests to live and the earth needs forests/green areas for oxygen.

Then they came up with plastic bags and paper went by the wayside. I used to use plastic until I became educated about their effects on the environment. I use my recycle bags for groceries and keep my use of plastic bags to a minimum.

So: paper degrades but whole forests are lost, and take years to regrow. Plastic is worse.. more use of oil, they don't degrade and our landfills are overflowing with it.

What's the solution? I believe that biodegradable bags are the only way to go as long as they are made from recycled products that are already available and the chemicals needed to manufacture them aren't harmful to the environment. They need to be strong enough to handle moisture, or the average consumer won't use them if plastic is still available.
It is a false dichotomy, the goal is to have most people move to reusable bags not paper bags.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 09:21 PM.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top