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Old 05-25-2008, 10:40 AM
 
Location: State of Being
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Wood burning stove, freestanding, to heat 900 sq. ft. - will need to be vented through wall to outside. Any recommendations? TIA!!!
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Old 05-25-2008, 01:18 PM
 
Location: Maine
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You need to find a local company or two that specialize in wood stove sales and INSTALLATION. The rules have changed significantly and chimneys have very specific requirements. I seem to recall reading recently that you can't vent a chimney for a wood stove through a wall - it must go through the ceiling. Perhaps mistaken.
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Old 05-25-2008, 03:26 PM
 
Location: The #1 sunshine state, Arizona.
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We have a quadra-fire. It is a pellet burning wood stove. Burns a lot cleaner than wood.
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Old 05-26-2008, 07:38 PM
 
Location: The Woods
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Going through the roof, so that most of the chimney is indoors, will make it draw better.

For that size of a building, a fairly small stove should do the trick.
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Old 05-26-2008, 10:02 PM
 
Location: Jax
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You'll want to get a full quote for installation before you purchase your stove.

You'll probably need to pull a permit, and if you don't have a pre-existing chimney to tie into (put in a flue liner), you might have to have something constructed.

You can't just run the stove up through your roof without fire-proofing all the contact points, and you can't run it out a wall, as pointed out by Shadowfax.

I looked into it for an older home I have, and because I have a pre-existing chimney (from an old oil-heater), I can line the flue. Along with a really nice stove, I should be able to do this for under $4000 (could do it for quite a bit less if I went with a cheaper stove). If I did not have the pre-existing chimney, I don't think I'd even approach the project.

That's just what I've learned about it, you'll want to keep investigating .
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Old 05-27-2008, 10:32 AM
 
Location: State of Being
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Well. A lot to think about. This is for our second home in the mountains of NC. There used to be a "round" stove in the center of the room (old ski chalet) but that vent has been covered over . . . so we wanted to put the stove next to a wall and vent it out the wall. I thought it would be an easy fix as that wall is just wood (not brick or stone on the outside). We have so much wood on the property that is already cut . . . and would like to use the wood as the natural gas is so expensive to heat it. Has cost us over $1200 the last two winters (that is EACH YEAR) just for natural gas. And the hot water heater is electric!!! Our son is living there while in college so we wanted to see about wood heating.

Any other suggestions? I am kind of let down now.
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Old 05-27-2008, 10:49 AM
 
Location: The Woods
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Well if you get a used stove cheap it'll offset the costs somewhat. There are plenty of used stoves available cheap, many of them modern ones too. Is it a 1 story structure, with a cathedral type ceiling? If so, you won't need a lot of chimney pipe, as stove pipe is used up to the ceiling (actually a safe distance below it but close enough) and stovepipe is cheap, unlike chimney pipe. If you have a loft above where the stove will be, you'll need more chimney pipe. Use quality insulated chimney pipe. You just really want to follow all the clearance instructions for both the stove, stove pipe, and chimney.

You could run chimney pipe out the wall and up the side of the wall , but it saves no money really, and the chimney won't draw as well being outside the whole way up.

Whether you need any permits depends on the location. Many areas don't require any, others do.

If worse comes to worst, a cast iron box stove from Vogelzang (cheap Chinese import brand) tends to be under $200 for the stove, not terribly efficient (but cleaner, being non-airtight, than older pre-EPA airtights), but it could save money...
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Old 05-27-2008, 11:35 AM
 
Location: State of Being
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post
Well if you get a used stove cheap it'll offset the costs somewhat. There are plenty of used stoves available cheap, many of them modern ones too. Is it a 1 story structure, with a cathedral type ceiling? If so, you won't need a lot of chimney pipe, as stove pipe is used up to the ceiling (actually a safe distance below it but close enough) and stovepipe is cheap, unlike chimney pipe. If you have a loft above where the stove will be, you'll need more chimney pipe. Use quality insulated chimney pipe. You just really want to follow all the clearance instructions for both the stove, stove pipe, and chimney.

You could run chimney pipe out the wall and up the side of the wall , but it saves no money really, and the chimney won't draw as well being outside the whole way up.

Whether you need any permits depends on the location. Many areas don't require any, others do.

If worse comes to worst, a cast iron box stove from Vogelzang (cheap Chinese import brand) tends to be under $200 for the stove, not terribly efficient (but cleaner, being non-airtight, than older pre-EPA airtights), but it could save money...
Thanks for all the ideas and suggestions! Really appreciated! Yes, cathedral ceiling. I can check on permits . . . I don't think we will have a problem w/ a permit (but we are in a resort area and the neighbors will doubtless complain). We bought 14 years ago, and bought one of the original ski chalets . . . and actually have two gorgeous lots. The ownership has changed and now we are surrounded by Floridians who have built $1 M + homes . . . and unfortunately, altho most of them leave for the winter, we have a neighbor who would like to push our house down the hill, LOL, as it does not match up to her 'standards' for an upscale resort. SIGH. So it is all probably an impossible situation as the first time she sees a puff of smoke come out our chimney, the board will be called into special session to get us evicted off the property. I am SO NOT KIDDING.

Oh well. I am going to check any covenants w/ the club and gonna check on county regs . . . get a local dealer over and see what is possible. Those natural gas bills are killing us. If our son were not there - no biggie as we ordinarily only use the place a limited amount in the winter.
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Old 05-27-2008, 11:42 AM
 
Location: The Woods
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Well that's good. Stovepipe can be used up to the support box in the ceiling, so it'll save quite a bit of money.

I guess you'll have to be sure to follow any codes/rules to the letter, if your neighbor is like that.

Just be sure to keep the chimney clean to avoid any chimney fires. Making sure the wood is dry will go a long way in reducing creosote build up.
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Old 05-27-2008, 11:48 AM
 
Location: State of Being
35,885 posts, read 67,023,037 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post
Well that's good. Stovepipe can be used up to the support box in the ceiling, so it'll save quite a bit of money.

I guess you'll have to be sure to follow any codes/rules to the letter, if your neighbor is like that.

Just be sure to keep the chimney clean to avoid any chimney fires. Making sure the wood is dry will go a long way in reducing creosote build up.
Thank you for the advice! My son is pretty responsible but I do worry about his having a fire going . . . and dear me - chimney fires . . . oh my.

I am just at a loss to know what to do to cut the heating bills. ??? Any other ideas for alternative heating source????
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