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Old 07-24-2012, 04:32 PM
 
Location: Glasgow Scotland
15,252 posts, read 12,475,997 times
Reputation: 22046

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can you believe this gets worse.....


I save up two or three canisters of hoover lint, (I have a bag-less machine) in old pillow cases. When the pillow case is full simply tie off or sew closed the top. Throw that in the clothes dryer and, presto you have a new/recycled pillow!

http://www.recyclethis.co.uk/2010032...from-vacuuming
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Old 07-24-2012, 04:35 PM
 
Location: Wrangell, Alaska
18 posts, read 28,801 times
Reputation: 34
Lint is extremely flammable. I use it as a fire starter sometimes when camping.
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Old 07-24-2012, 05:01 PM
 
Location: Back in the gym...Yo Adrian!
9,371 posts, read 17,956,033 times
Reputation: 18405
Quote:
Originally Posted by dwblake View Post
Lint is extremely flammable. I use it as a fire starter sometimes when camping.
Same here. I use dryer lint as kindling to get my campfires started, works like a charm!
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Old 07-24-2012, 07:04 PM
 
Location: southwest TN
8,224 posts, read 14,851,840 times
Reputation: 14976
Quote:
Originally Posted by GregW View Post
Dark colors overwhelm light colors everytime. Indigo in blue jeans is one of the strongest blues around and everybody washes denim.
Not everyone wears denim. With 2 of us in the house, neither of us wears denim. At all. Our lint is generally light colored.
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Old 07-24-2012, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Eugenius
593 posts, read 1,231,556 times
Reputation: 580
I had a neighbor who made handmade paper out of dryer lint. So I came upon an old window screen and I was collecting lint for months to make a really big art piece with handmade paper. I had a good stock of it, plus tissue paper from Xmas and bits of ribbon for color, but I'm moving out of state and didn't have the time to make the paper. So I threw it all away, the inner hoarder in me gritted my teeth when I did it!
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Old 07-25-2012, 06:39 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,505 posts, read 51,197,249 times
Reputation: 24606
Sns - try again but remember to soak and beat the lint (cloth only) until it absorbs all the water possible. Then make paper that will last a very long time. That is how they make currency paper only they use paper making machines.
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Old 07-25-2012, 09:17 AM
 
9,346 posts, read 10,127,453 times
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I have heard of taking dryer lint and putting it in a blender with a wild plant that is high in cellulose to make paper.
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Old 07-25-2012, 12:20 PM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,505 posts, read 51,197,249 times
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That will do but it is better paper if only cloth is used. If the lint is colored, bleach with Clorox and rinse very well. Other interesting uses for well bleached and hydrolized cellulose pulp are left to the reader's imagination.
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Old 07-29-2012, 03:18 PM
 
29,988 posts, read 37,073,599 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by flowersforyou View Post
Could a person use dryer lint for insulation? You could go around to laundry mats and clean out their filters on an everyday basis til' your house was packed with the stuff. What do you suppose the R factor would be? That would be the ultimate in recycling. I can picture quilters using this lint to line their quilts. Yeah baby! We may have stumbled on to something great! GOT LINT?
Given that lint is a great tinder for starting fires I don't think it is the most adviseable material to use for insulation.
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Old 08-04-2012, 10:38 PM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
9,564 posts, read 18,762,790 times
Reputation: 8410
I've been using the dryer lint for mulch in the garden. The fibers were too short to spin into yarn but they make decent mulch.
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