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Old 09-25-2008, 09:03 AM
 
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Introducing the GREEN* water bottle | DesMoinesRegister.com | The Des Moines Register (http://tinyurl.com/3mc7bz - broken link)
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Old 09-25-2008, 09:09 AM
 
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Great idea, but if the bottles are not composted, will they decompose in regular trash? A HUGE part of the water bottle problem now is that people do not recycle them and half the time they don't even end up in the garbage and end up as litter instead. Never understood that line of thought "Hmm, I'm going to drink water instead of soda to make my body healthy and when I'm done with it, I'm going to toss it out my car window and befowl the planet I live on"
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Old 09-25-2008, 09:16 AM
 
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That stuff still has be produced as well, which is a very intensive, water hogging, polluting process...

I prefer to reuse the glasses in my cupboard, or my Nalgene with my free tap water.

Although in the situation cited in the article, disposable things are going to be used no matter what, so it is good that they are composting the plates and bottles.
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Old 09-25-2008, 09:29 AM
 
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Oh, I'm with you Nessatar, when I can I use my reusable mug for water and such. But every once in a while, I'm caught without water somewhere and need to buy a plastic bottle. If there is no recycle bin, I'll take it home to recycle it there.
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Old 09-25-2008, 09:35 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lialleycat View Post
Oh, I'm with you Nessatar, when I can I use my reusable mug for water and such. But every once in a while, I'm caught without water somewhere and need to buy a plastic bottle. If there is no recycle bin, I'll take it home to recycle it there.
Yup, that happens to me too.
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Old 09-25-2008, 08:40 PM
 
Location: Jax
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Something that biodegrades is great. Hopefully it truly biodegrades on its' own, as Lialleycat pointed out. Remember when it was realized some of the early biodegradable plastic bags didn't degrade in the landfill if they weren't exposed to sunlight?

If they can make these bottles out of corn, I wonder if other types of plant cellulose would also work? Whenever I hear corn these days, I think of the amount of land area needed, subsidies, etc., so I wonder if a plant of less impact would work just as well?
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Old 09-25-2008, 08:51 PM
 
132 posts, read 417,881 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by riveree View Post
Something that biodegrades is great. Hopefully it truly biodegrades on its' own, as Lialleycat pointed out. Remember when it was realized some of the early biodegradable plastic bags didn't degrade in the landfill if they weren't exposed to sunlight?

If they can make these bottles out of corn, I wonder if other types of plant cellulose would also work? Whenever I hear corn these days, I think of the amount of land area needed, subsidies, etc., so I wonder if a plant of less impact would work just as well?
I suspect that they use the biproducts of corn processing and the stalks etc. Of course, there is still the problem of not returning any of the plant matter to the land and having to rely on chemical fertilizers, but corn farmers do that anyway to a certain extent.
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Old 09-26-2008, 06:44 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
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If we put a suitable (say 50 cents each on smaller and a dollar each on the gallon size) return fee on all bottles it would go a long way toward increasing the recycle rate. Coca Cola did it with returnable glass bottles for over 50 years. We could also apply this to lots of other junk like “disposable” spray cans.
[SIZE=3] [/SIZE]
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Old 09-26-2008, 09:14 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
41,505 posts, read 51,217,407 times
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Follow up on Deposit bottles - Can you see a consumer paying $5 for a 24 bottle case of water plus a $12 deposit? This is why they ended deposit bottles. It transfered the waste disposal cost to the taxpayer instead of keeping the costs inside the beverage industry.

Remember the neocon watchword - Private wealth - public costs.
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Old 09-27-2008, 10:34 AM
 
28,131 posts, read 39,737,199 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by GregW View Post
Follow up on Deposit bottles - Can you see a consumer paying $5 for a 24 bottle case of water plus a $12 deposit? This is why they ended deposit bottles. It transfered the waste disposal cost to the taxpayer instead of keeping the costs inside the beverage industry.

Remember the neocon watchword - Private wealth - public costs.
We pay a deposit on can and bottles. Pop, beer, wine, etc. Keeps the ditches clean and the grocery store owners whining. 5 cent deposit. Still waiting for a change in the law to include the plastics - that will really irritate those poor money-grubbing grocers!
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