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Old 10-12-2008, 12:12 PM
 
Location: hopefully NYC one day :D
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Old 10-12-2008, 05:08 PM
 
Location: hopefully NYC one day :D
411 posts, read 1,052,239 times
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I am also wondering, if you turn the A/C off in a house and you let the hot air in, does the house actually become hotter than the outside because the heat that you let go inside the house becomes trapped? If so, then consider this: you have a house. You have a high-rise and each unit has insulation in between. You let the heat in the house and it becomes hotter than the outside. You also let the heat in each high-rise unit. Even though heat is entering each unit on one side as opposed to the houses’ 4 or more sides, do the high-rise units become hotter than the house (along with the outside of course) because each unit is surrounded by other units that are also hotter than the outside, whereas the house is surrounded by the outside that is cooler (but still hot) than the inside?
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Old 10-12-2008, 07:01 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by City_boi View Post
I am also wondering, if you turn the A/C off in a house and you let the hot air in, does the house actually become hotter than the outside because the heat that you let go inside the house becomes trapped?
Not really
I don't have A/C. I open windows at night and let in cooler air.
In the morning I close things up to retain cooler air. Morning and afternoon it is cooler in my house than outside.
Mid afternoon things begin to level out and I open windows.
Evening temperature drops outside quicker than it does inside. I make sure all windows and doors are open to take advantage of cross ventilation. If there is no breeze I put a fan in the front and rear of the house to create cross ventilation.
It works quite well, we are comfortable unless temps get into the high 90's.
Tougher to do in places where it doesn't cool down at night, there is no breeze or it is very humid.
If you look at regional, historic architecture you can see there were certainly certain techniques developed to deal with varieties in climate. Newer buildings usually do not factor those sort of things in....hard to tell where in the country you are when looking at a new high rise or subdivision.
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Old 10-13-2008, 09:19 PM
 
Location: hopefully NYC one day :D
411 posts, read 1,052,239 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stock66 View Post
If you look at regional, historic architecture you can see there were certainly certain techniques developed to deal with varieties in climate.
Like what?
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Old 10-14-2008, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
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Citi-boi - the techniques are too numerous to detail here. Find a book on building design for extreme climates for more info.
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Old 10-14-2008, 12:01 PM
 
392 posts, read 1,710,856 times
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Things like wide eaves, deep porches, thick walls, sleeping porches, high ceilings, attics, and placing windows so as to best utilize cross ventilation.
Transoms above doors, double hung windows (lower the top to let heat near the ceiling escape) and in some areas raising the entire house to better catch breezes. Of course there is also the option of building partially underground or into a hillside. This will keep a house cooler in summer and also cut heating in winter.


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Old 10-14-2008, 02:43 PM
 
Location: hopefully NYC one day :D
411 posts, read 1,052,239 times
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but not all of those could be applied to tall buildings, right?
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Old 10-14-2008, 10:16 PM
 
Location: Jax
8,204 posts, read 32,207,822 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by City_boi View Post
I am also wondering, if you turn the A/C off in a house and you let the hot air in, does the house actually become hotter than the outside because the heat that you let go inside the house becomes trapped?
In my recent personal experience - YES!

During the peak of this past summer, we had a tropical storm come through and my city had one of the worst blackouts we've ever experienced. We had no electricity for 4 days. When it was 85 degrees outside, our house would be well over 90 degrees. Even the air outside wasn't moving, and nighttime was no better (still hot and humid). It was definitely hotter in the house though.

This past winter, I had to take down a huge oak tree. It used to shade the house very well. Had it still been there, it would have helped, I'm sure (trust me, I would have loved to leave it up if I could have ).

I'm in the process now of planting to shade the house again, but in a different way. I'm shading the southern-exposed part of the house with some evergreen, some decidious trees/shrubs. I'm also trying to be careful not to shade the roof though since I plan to add solar panels up there *someday*. I'm also rethinking roof color, definitely leaning toward a lighter color when we redo the roof .
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