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Old 03-05-2009, 03:07 AM
 
2 posts, read 2,637 times
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Going green becoming the latest fad. What do you reckon?
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Old 03-05-2009, 03:51 AM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,126,253 times
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Originally Posted by michelle25 View Post
Going green becoming the latest fad. What do you reckon?
I see it going the other way, but in moderation. Some of the Green Ideas out there are all well and good, but it depends upon how they twist the facts and data.

Here in Maine we have been fighting over an island since 1980. The sierra club has been fighting the Maine DOT regarding a cargo port on it. Maine jobs are now winning out. The Sierra club was just punched in the teeth last week when the Governor split the island into two sections...2/3 for conservation and 1/3 for the cargo port. Jobs will ultimately win out just as it was when such monumental projects as the Hoover Dam and some other CCC projects went through in the 1930's. The days of having Environmental Impact Statements dwell for years and years is over.

As for the moderation part...I don't see nuclear power plants being built anytime soon, but people will start looking at green ways to intelligently reduce waste. I envision a "true product cost" being initiated on products soon. That is a "green price" put on new purchases so you can see what the cost of products are from purchase to end of life. In other words, that computer you buy will have a green price that includes the cost of the computer, the cost of energy consumption, and then the cost of disposal. Those three things will equal the "green price of the product". I see that on the horizon.
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Old 03-05-2009, 08:56 AM
 
37 posts, read 96,239 times
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It's a tight rope and yet - to go green is such a "catch all" phrase it is loosing meaning.

Doing things like:
-Growing your own food will reduce your cost, dependence and help create a resilient community when everyone starts doing it. See:
YouTube - Rob Hopkins' Transition Handbook
-Changing out energy intensive lawns for low maintenance -low growing / no mowing lawns saves time, money, reduces water pollution and a little gas (though that will be a bigger issue over time). See: NoMowGrass.com
- riding a bike 5 minutes to the store instead of taking the car gives you better health, reduces stress. See: Re-Bike.com where they recycle old bikes for use again.
-switching over your power sucking tv to an led is good if you take your old tv to a good recycling place. Same goes for old computer monitors.
- hanging clothes out instead of using a clothes dryer that sucks warm air out of the house, heats it then blows it outside (or in the summer- takes cooled air, heats it then blows it out side). . . how much sense does it really make?
-putting in a solar powered attic fan to reduce air conditioning. Adding insulation and sealing leaks is good common sense. Putting insulating curtains on windows and using them makes sense.

Doing things like:
-remodeling your house to "green" products while throwing the old into the landfill is not a green idea.
Buying things just cause they say it's green - stupid.

Going green is about keeping costs down, low energy and building permanent solutions to high energy living - in a meaningful way.
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Old 03-06-2009, 06:06 AM
 
Location: Cold Frozen North
1,928 posts, read 4,631,417 times
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I think it's largely a fad or a way to make money off of people.

That said, I do believe in certain things that over a reasonable period of time saves you money. For example, extra insulation in your house has a fast payback. I paid for extra insulation when I built my house. I understand that the payback is as little as a few years - that makes sense.

Also, putting in an attic fan can substantially reduce your cooling bill in summer. Probably also a quick payback.

Now, if you have to buy solar panels and the payback is 50 years and an initial cost of $50,000 or more, that's a non-starter with me.
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Old 03-06-2009, 07:55 AM
 
1,297 posts, read 3,126,253 times
Reputation: 1506
Quote:
Originally Posted by Latania View Post
It's a tight rope and yet - to go green is such a "catch all" phrase it is loosing meaning.

Doing things like:
-Growing your own food will reduce your cost, dependence and help create a resilient community when everyone starts doing it. See:
YouTube - Rob Hopkins' Transition Handbook
-Changing out energy intensive lawns for low maintenance -low growing / no mowing lawns saves time, money, reduces water pollution and a little gas (though that will be a bigger issue over time). See: NoMowGrass.com
- riding a bike 5 minutes to the store instead of taking the car gives you better health, reduces stress. See: Re-Bike.com where they recycle old bikes for use again.
-switching over your power sucking tv to an led is good if you take your old tv to a good recycling place. Same goes for old computer monitors.
- hanging clothes out instead of using a clothes dryer that sucks warm air out of the house, heats it then blows it outside (or in the summer- takes cooled air, heats it then blows it out side). . . how much sense does it really make?
-putting in a solar powered attic fan to reduce air conditioning. Adding insulation and sealing leaks is good common sense. Putting insulating curtains on windows and using them makes sense.

Doing things like:
-remodeling your house to "green" products while throwing the old into the landfill is not a green idea.
Buying things just cause they say it's green - stupid.

Going green is about keeping costs down, low energy and building permanent solutions to high energy living - in a meaningful way.
Great post! I am not very green I must admit,or at least I wasn't. I am slowly changing, but in moderation I guess.

The laundry issue...it is silly. There is absolutely no energy efficient dryer on the market. Hanging out laundry simply makes sense and we do that...in the summer anyway.

Here is another simple solution...get by on a smaller home. I lived in a 900 square foot home for 15 years. I have a 2100 square foot home now, but its silly...we don't need closets this big!

Did you know if the average Southern California home was to be converted into roman days, it would take 5000 slaves to live the same way! Talk about inefficient!

(PS: I did not buy a bigger home,I simply added on, building my home from wood on the farm here and using our sawmill. Overall I would say my carbon footprint is pretty low)
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