U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-09-2009, 02:10 PM
 
199 posts, read 584,019 times
Reputation: 108

Advertisements

Quote:
Originally Posted by bluepacific View Post
My wife is allergic to dairy products. So the soy route for her is the only way, but she does miss cream and cheeses. Here is the best brand of soy products sold here in Scandinavia. Though I'd rather have milk, these Alpro Soy Mjölk Products really are'nt that bad.
Do any stores carry these? My son is allergic as well
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-09-2009, 03:06 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,664,057 times
Reputation: 18036
I'd rather not drink milk than drink Soy or even 2% milk. Whole milk is the only yone I enjoy; otherwsie I can just skip it.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2009, 04:08 PM
 
Location: Portland, Oregon
7,090 posts, read 10,736,322 times
Reputation: 4107
I like soy "milk", but it's not milk...it's soy juice. To have milk you need a teet, and their ain't one on a soy bean.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2009, 05:08 PM
Status: "Nobody's right if everybody's wrong" (set 1 day ago)
 
Location: New Albany, Indiana (Greater Louisville)
9,771 posts, read 21,077,935 times
Reputation: 9358
In terms of carbon pollution it may be debatable, but in terms of treatment towards animals soy is much better morally.

On the small farm my mother grew up on a cow was only milked after it calved every couple of years. A cow in a commercial milk factory (do not confuse with a farm) is milked nonstop for years. If it stops producing milk they get it pregnant and then abort its calf to keep the milk flowing. In addition soy milk also has tons of fiber and vitamins that regular milk doesn't have.

People that don't like the taste of the powdered stuff need to try the chocolate or vanilla flavored soy in a half gallon container.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2009, 05:58 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,385 posts, read 37,689,162 times
Reputation: 22518
People get issues confused sometimes and end up fighting the wrong battles.

Instead of trying to get people to stop eating things that CAN be produced in a less than humane manner, work to get people to insist that the food they eat (animal or vegetable - vegetables have feelings, too, evidently, if research is to be believed ) is raised in a humane manner, and preferably locally. Fight factory farming (of whatever variety), not the diets of others.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2009, 06:19 PM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,407,272 times
Reputation: 8158
So much false statements posted here I dont know where to begin.

censusdata-------cows are bred to freshen to calve once a year-------big dairy or small farm

Cows are milked for 10 months after calving, get a 2 month rest before calving again--------big dairy or small farm

ABORTING a pregnancy would solve nothing cuz a cow needs a calving period to " kick in " the milk production--------big dairy or small farm

Also, if cows were aborted, where would heifers come from for replacements?-------big dairy or small farm alike--
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2009, 06:28 PM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,407,272 times
Reputation: 8158
I have dairy farmed using a grass/legume base for the last 16 years.( rotational grazing from early May til mid October )

We still feed the cows corn gran at milking time cuz corn is an energy feed and we don't want the cows to milk themselves skinny and be hard to breed back.

I don't know of any dairy farm that relies primarily on corn grain to feed dairy cows.

Even on poster Broken Tap's family farm where they feed both haylage and corn sileage. Corn sileage is a --forage-- and not a grain.

Broken Tap says they can get 25 tons per acre when they harvest corn sileage.
If the grain yield is 100 bushels per acre, that means that roughly 89% of that is a forage ( stalks,leaves, husks, and cobs, ) and only 11% is actually grain.


I know of--no-- dairy that relies on corn /grain as the primary feed for its dairy cows.

If you posters know of some, please prove me wrong .
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2009, 06:32 PM
 
4,052 posts, read 6,397,744 times
Reputation: 4150
If you are feeding cattle soy then I think it's time to become a vegan. Steers and cows where intended to feed on grass not corn or soy. Corn and soy fed beef are sick and consuming those products from these ill-fed livestock compromises the health of those that consume them.
FYI: Many food companies are now using soy oil in their products because corn products are now more expensive. Hellman's mayo is one of them. People with thyroid problems should not use soy products. Others may have digestive problems due to the hidden soy in processed foods. Read the labels!
Got milk...stay with the real thing, enjoy and be healthy.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2009, 06:34 PM
 
Location: Central Texas
20,385 posts, read 37,689,162 times
Reputation: 22518
Quote:
Originally Posted by marmac View Post
I have dairy farmed using a grass/legume base for the last 16 years.( rotational grazing from early May til mid October )

We still feed the cows corn gran at milking time cuz corn is an energy feed and we don't want the cows to milk themselves skinny and be hard to breed back.

I don't know of any dairy farm that relies primarily on corn grain to feed dairy cows.

Even on poster Broken Tap's family farm where they feed both haylage and corn sileage. Corn sileage is a --forage-- and not a grain.

Broken Tap says they can get 25 tons per acre when they harvest corn sileage.
If the grain yield is 100 bushels per acre, that means that roughly 89% of that is a forage ( stalks,leaves, husks, and cobs, ) and only 11% is actually grain.


I know of--no-- dairy that relies on corn /grain as the primary feed for its dairy cows.

If you posters know of some, please prove me wrong .

Did you read the article that I linked to?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-09-2009, 06:42 PM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,407,272 times
Reputation: 8158
Yes I did.

He mentioned---flax--but also mentioned it was very expensive.

Also, Vermont may be milder than Minnesota, but I'll bet he can't graze many more months than me and will have to rely on stored forages for those months--------just like conventional dairy farms elsewhere.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Green Living
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6. The time now is 11:50 AM.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top