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Old 10-30-2009, 10:32 AM
 
20 posts, read 78,380 times
Reputation: 16

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people who have responded about tire bale... do you actually know what a tire bale is?

they are roughly 5 foot x 5 foot square blocks of about 100 tires compressed at enormous pressure and banded with metal straps.

these are not loose tires.

i doubt water would be an issue with them.

water is a known issue with straw bale, however.

rubber does not mold or rot.

when i first started researching i was sold on straw bale. there seems to be a very low tolerance for getting them wet during construction, plus the issue of animal infilitration, so i shied away from it.

the issue with cordwood that was posted here is that the concrete portion of it ( which is substantial) will act as a heat sink and therefore not be economical to heat.

tile bales are covered 100 percent with stucco, so the same issues exist here too.

i looked again into containers. for a temporary living thing these could be very cool. i had the idea to straw bale the entire surface area of one and then possible stucco that, providing nice insulation against the cold and elements. any thoughts?

something tells me that cordwood cannot be so inefficient otherwise there wouldn't be so many of them and so many supporters, but i can only guess at this point. and i'm not sure that some posters here are talking about 24 inch, foam or sawdust insulated cordwood.

i guess i am partially open to regular log cabin too, but it seems to have more drawbacks than either cordwood or tirebale. there is still the debarking and drying period, which makes it expensive.
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Old 12-27-2009, 04:10 AM
 
20 posts, read 78,380 times
Reputation: 16
Default update

i just read a great composting book.

so i am conifdent now in that i don't need city water/sewage. the only thing i need will be land and electricity (and a well).

can someone chime in on issues of just the first step in buying land with the intent to build on it. i don't want to deal with any gov't hassles with the composting toilet.

what is involved with establishing a mailing address on a new property?

would it be a good idea to contact the local municipality to ask them about ordinances, or is it best to just mind my own business.
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Old 12-27-2009, 08:41 AM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,635 posts, read 49,287,779 times
Reputation: 19019
Quote:
Originally Posted by francis_key View Post
i just read a great composting book.

so i am confident now in that i don't need city water/sewage. the only thing i need will be land and electricity (and a well).
Hand pumps are available for your well too.



Quote:
... can someone chime in on issues of just the first step in buying land with the intent to build on it. i don't want to deal with any gov't hassles with the composting toilet.
Just shop for land and buy. That is what I did.

Each state is different. Here, if you build a house with a foundation then you need a building permit. This state requires that you must have a septic system in the ground [stone bed leach field, or mound, or chambers]. But once it is installed, they do not require that you use it. So you can use an outhouse or composting toilets, if you wish to do so.

On the other hand, cabins are very popular.

A cabin with no foundation, either set on blocks, or piers, or pontoons, or a trailer; does not require a building permit. Nor do they require a septic system.



Quote:
... what is involved with establishing a mailing address on a new property?
I did this too.

Just set a mailbox in the ground.

Then I spent two days calling the state for an official 9/11 street address. Finally one state office called me back, saying that they has sent a guy out to our driveway, to get the exact spot on GPS, and they told me the new street address. So I painted that on my mail box.

But it was out of the sequence of the neighbors. UPS and Fedex could not find me. Their truck drivers would call me asking where I was each time they had a delivery to make to me.

Then a year later, the mail carrier gave me an official notice to change my street address to something that is in the sequence of everyone else on the road. So I made-up a number. I have neighbors about a mile away on either side, so I chose a street number that seemed to be about between them.

Now the Postal system seems to be happy with our street number, the UPS and Fedex drivers can find us, and it even seems to be fairly close to where Google-earth says it should be.

What I learned from this? The gubbermint's 9/11 street addressing system is FUBAR.

Just make-up a street number that is in the sequence of your neighbors, and everyone will be happy with it.



Quote:
... would it be a good idea to contact the local municipality to ask them about ordinances, or is it best to just mind my own business.
Might not be a bad idea.
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Old 12-27-2009, 03:16 PM
 
Location: The Woods
16,936 posts, read 22,202,288 times
Reputation: 9020
Quote:
Originally Posted by francis_key View Post

can someone chime in on issues of just the first step in buying land with the intent to build on it. i don't want to deal with any gov't hassles with the composting toilet.
Check out any state and local rules that may restrict what you do. When buying land, the standard cautions apply: check the title, watch out for easements, make sure it's not wetlands, in a flood zone...

Quote:
what is involved with establishing a mailing address on a new property?
Check with the postal service, they'll help you on that.

Quote:
would it be a good idea to contact the local municipality to ask them about ordinances, or is it best to just mind my own business.
Do it before buying. Some places you can get away with ignoring that stuff, others you can't...
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Old 01-25-2010, 05:48 PM
 
133 posts, read 246,036 times
Reputation: 152
I know this won't make sense but try to take it in and research what i say.I think your better off buying a broken down home on some acreage.Make sure the septic and well are working,and the local ceo(code enforcement officer)will prove it.Better yet make that the terms of the purchase.Water is important,(you test the water through a qualified unbiased company)and the ability to flush and shower,etc.,are priceless,especially for eventual resale.
Check the prices of raw acreage against the same amount of acreage with a hoopdee house.The hoopdee house has electric,septic and well on site(lots of money to set up from scratch).Close before spring,and start butts and elbows work to set up before your first winter.20 raw acres versus 20 acres with the bones of a home minimal price difference.Plus you inherit some meadow(growing food),water,septic,electric and immediate shelter.Just make sure the bones of the house are good,especially the roof.
i am not ready but i found almost 20 acres with a farmhouse for 60,000.20 acres raw about the same.Have you any idea the money and b-busting clearing needed on acreage.Figure the money needed to build any shelter,opposed to a 10g material investment in rehabbing an old keeper.Well,septic and electric will cost more than that.
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Old 01-25-2010, 07:37 PM
 
Location: Forests of Maine
30,635 posts, read 49,287,779 times
Reputation: 19019
Quote:
Originally Posted by pinefarm View Post
I know this won't make sense but try to take it in and research what i say.I think your better off buying a broken down home on some acreage.Make sure the septic and well are working,and the local ceo(code enforcement officer)will prove it.Better yet make that the terms of the purchase.Water is important,(you test the water through a qualified unbiased company)and the ability to flush and shower,etc.,are priceless,especially for eventual resale.
Check the prices of raw acreage against the same amount of acreage with a hoopdee house.The hoopdee house has electric,septic and well on site(lots of money to set up from scratch).Close before spring,and start butts and elbows work to set up before your first winter.20 raw acres versus 20 acres with the bones of a home minimal price difference.Plus you inherit some meadow(growing food),water,septic,electric and immediate shelter.Just make sure the bones of the house are good,especially the roof.
i am not ready but i found almost 20 acres with a farmhouse for 60,000.20 acres raw about the same.Have you any idea the money and b-busting clearing needed on acreage.Figure the money needed to build any shelter,opposed to a 10g material investment in rehabbing an old keeper.Well,septic and electric will cost more than that.
$60k for 20-acres of bare land, boy they saw you coming from a distance.
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Old 01-25-2010, 09:41 PM
 
9,807 posts, read 13,408,924 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by forest beekeeper View Post
$60k for 20-acres of bare land, boy they saw you coming from a distance.
Depends upon where.

Bare land in our area sells for $3000 per acre and that is usually for 40 acres or more.

On parcels smaller than 40 acres, the price per acre is higher.
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Old 01-26-2010, 05:37 PM
 
133 posts, read 246,036 times
Reputation: 152
Forest, Well no one saw me coming,because i didn't go there.Pick an area and research raw land price versus same size with a beater house.Now i see you got a good deal and are happy.I am happy for you.However where i have researched raw land is not a deal.Maybe different in maine but i'm not looking there.

Marmac,I hear you.How about 5acres for 35g,or a nice home with freeze damage in foreclosure with well,septic,electric,2,000sq.ft and all the work pretty much done and 2 acres for 56g?Do people think building a home is free?No material cost and 2,000hrs of work for free?I thought green living was supposed to be frugal.Once i spend 120g for 40 acres where is my money to build and live somewhere?
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Old 06-09-2010, 03:13 AM
 
Location: Vermont
5,439 posts, read 14,745,248 times
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francis key I am curious if any progress has been made for you?

We may like to do something similar, however I am not sure about giving up so many amenities. I mean we need a fridge but modern fridges can be fairly efficient (like 1 KW/h a day?.. maybe a bit more), we probably would want a clothes washer. More likely I am just looking for something which is small and extremely space/energy efficient. We already live in a 750 sq ft house, but it is old and leaky, and it is in the wrong place physically.

While I do not love propane (for example), on demand water heaters (how are you getting your hot water???) are very efficient. Propane for cooking is also great. I do not want to stoke a fire every time I want tea,coffee, or to make dinner for example.

I have no problem with being OTG with solar panels or on the grid and simply using less power.

What are you doing with your graywater? And what about brown/black water?

If graywater is "clean" (say you are using only natural plant based soaps for example) can you just put it back into the ground?

Essentially can this be done w/o a septic system if you have a composting or incinerating toilet?

Where we would be comfortable living tends to be NY state or possibly VT. I am not sure how or if this would fly building code wise.

I do not really have the skills to build my own home though... and I wish I had the time or help to learn but I don't think I do. So I believe this would mean a modular or site built home for me. Depending on total costs we could pay cash. But I imagine (again depending on costs) we'd want to insure it...

Last edited by joe moving; 06-09-2010 at 03:23 AM..
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Old 06-15-2010, 01:09 PM
 
20 posts, read 78,380 times
Reputation: 16
Default progress

i don't think i ever mentioned going without electricity or a fridge or a washer.

i haven't figured out the graywater solution, but i plan on using a composting system for blackwater. (see joe jenkins book)

i have the time to build, but not the knowledge. still reading up on building.

i am guessing that vermont property taxes are much higher than maine, and i suspect they are more dilligent with building codes, but i'm not sure. it depends how rural you want to go. for me i have no need to be close to a fancy town, so the initial land purchase will be on the cheap. as posted by someone else, cash is king. some owners will finance, at a higher rate than a regular house mortgage. i wont even bother trying to get bank financing -- KISS philosophy, keep it simple stupid.

re: buying a junker house on land, that is a very good idea, and one that i am still considering. having the well, electricity, foundation, etc all in place is a huge plus.

rural maine land is about the cheapest in the country.

i am wrestling with 6 months of cold vs maybe going to tennessee or thereabouts. but muggy weather is a problem too. there is no ideal situation.

i am also considering going off grid and using a generator for the minimal electricity i will be using.

in my mind at least i have made progress but still wrestling with some issues. it will be very tempting when i have all the money to do this, maybe not too far off.
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