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Old 09-30-2009, 04:57 PM
 
6 posts, read 22,723 times
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Hey Guys,

I have started a website which lists and describes all "green" focused communities in the United States for easy browsing. I use the quotation marks, because we will only be featuring communities that have achieved some level of certification, but the shades of green vary highly between some developments.

The site is called Green Housing Developments (http://www.greenhousingdevelopments.com - broken link). Please take a look at it and let me know what you think.

Interested consumers can request information (listings, brochures, etc..) from a local green agent who will answer any questions and help them find a home.

Any feedback would be helpful. We are currently in 10 states and will be expanding quickly. Also, if you have suggestions for communities in your area, please post them here, and we can get them added.

The mission is to inform consumers of green housing options and to promote more eco-friendly living.
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Old 10-02-2009, 11:58 AM
 
Location: Brooklyn New York
15,614 posts, read 25,071,764 times
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Green Living, and I bet that not one home will have a clothesline in the backyard.

no clothesline = not green enough for me
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Old 10-02-2009, 01:32 PM
 
6 posts, read 22,723 times
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Default Clotheslines

Hey Nightcrawler,

I understand what you are saying. It does seem that sometimes communities call themselves "green" but forget to make common sense changes like encourage the use of clotheslines.

You may want to check out these developments. I don't know what the covenants and restrictions say about clotheslines, but the overall focus definitely seems to be on trying to revive the wonderful qualities of neighborhoods of the past.

Serenbe - Palmetto, Georgia
Serenbe - Palmetto, Georgia Real Estate - Green Housing Developments & Sustainable Communities - Overview Green Homes In USA (http://www.greenhousingdevelopments.com/details/Georgia/Serenbe - broken link)

Pringle Creek - Salem, Oregon
Pringle Creek - Salem, Oregon Real Estate - Green Housing Developments & Sustainable Communities - Overview Green Homes In USA (http://www.greenhousingdevelopments.com/details/Oregon/Pringle%20Creek - broken link)

Mixson - North Charleston, South Carolina
Mixson - North Charleston, South Carolina Real Estate - Green Housing Developments & Sustainable Communities - Overview Green Homes In USA (http://www.greenhousingdevelopments.com/details/South%20Carolina/Mixson - broken link)
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Old 10-02-2009, 02:28 PM
 
Location: Brooklyn New York
15,614 posts, read 25,071,764 times
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Thank you.

Why is it that some people really get horrified when they see clothes hanging on a line to dry. I just don't get it.
Clothes are something we all have, we all wear and do need to be washed and dried. What is the big problem??
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Old 10-02-2009, 02:31 PM
 
6 posts, read 22,723 times
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I am with you Nightcrawler. I grew up with one in the backyard.
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Old 10-07-2009, 08:23 AM
 
10,630 posts, read 23,442,909 times
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I know it's not a direct answer, but just a comment (and yes, I'm sure the OP realizes this): do the buyers of these places fully realize the irony in buying in a "green" development that has a walk score of 25? (as did one of the places I looked at on the website), where everything was just "a short drive away".) Or Oak Crest's walk score of 5? A 4,000 square foot house in a suburban development (in other words, not exactly like the residents of Oak Crest are going to be farming their food or living off the grid) is nowhere near "eco-friendly," no matter how "green" the paint finishes or how many tankless water heaters one installs. Not to go off-topic, but I'm in the middle of reading David Owen's "Green Metropolis" and it's really hitting home. I think he'd say (and I'd say that he's right) that you should put Manhattan (or any dense urban center) on your list of eco-friendly living options.

I do appreciate that the website does list the walk scores, though, and does highlight the fact that a higher walk score does directly translate into a more environmentally friendly choice, but why bother including those below a certain level at all? (or, I can see why a website would include such a thing, but why would self-described environmentalists who would look at a page about green housing developments possibly think that some of these options - the standard McMansions with a slight PR makeover - remotely qualify as "green?")
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Old 10-07-2009, 12:03 PM
 
5,019 posts, read 12,754,056 times
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I think it's a neat idea. The website is bright and easy to navigate. I understand what uptown-urbanist was saying above. I've had a very simple way of determining if an area is livable, for me, for the past few decades: I must be able to walk or bike (in under 10 minutes) to a bank, a library and shopping, plus work and school, or it's a no-go for me.

I like that you included the walk-ability calculator. I just wish it was a bit more noticeable, like at the top of the page? It would be nice to be able to search or sort by that score as well.

Good luck.
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Old 10-07-2009, 12:21 PM
 
6 posts, read 22,723 times
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Thanks for the input everyone! I am in absolute agreement about the importance of a neighborhood being walkable, for that reason we have choose mostly urban developments to feature on the site. That said, there are several communities which are suburban or even rural which have been featured. I guess in defense of those communities, I would say that city living is not for everyone, and even though it may be a light shade of green, it's still a step forward. However, I strongly support, and personally live, in areas which are extremely walkable.

Thanks again, and keep checking those walkscores!
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Old 10-07-2009, 06:48 PM
 
Location: Redondo Beach, CA
7,343 posts, read 7,147,438 times
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GREAT website! Extremely informative. Lots of information. Easy to navigate. Simple and pleasing design. Well done!
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Old 10-07-2009, 10:33 PM
 
10,630 posts, read 23,442,909 times
Reputation: 6703
Quote:
Originally Posted by redman0302 View Post
Thanks for the input everyone! I am in absolute agreement about the importance of a neighborhood being walkable, for that reason we have choose mostly urban developments to feature on the site. That said, there are several communities which are suburban or even rural which have been featured. I guess in defense of those communities, I would say that city living is not for everyone, and even though it may be a light shade of green, it's still a step forward. However, I strongly support, and personally live, in areas which are extremely walkable.

Thanks again, and keep checking those walkscores!
I agree that city living isn't for everyone, and that's okay, too. I guess where it bothers me is when people think that they are being "green" by choosing an extremely car-dependent and not particularly energy-efficient lifestyle yet think then get self-righteous and smug about their lifestyle, but that's another topic. (I don't think most people are like that, but I've encountered a few; it's a sore spot!) I agree that if someone does want a huge new house in a subdivision then at least it's better that the house in question does meet certain standards. Something is better than nothing, certainly. I think it's wonderful that you're highlighting the walk scores, and maybe it will subtly remind people that being able to walk to some places (even if not everything) can make a positive environmental, as well as community, impact. I once visited someone in a ritzy suburb in MD one time where my friend's parents wanted to drive us from the top of the driveway (not all that long a distance) to the street to save us the walk. An extreme, perhaps, but even if people only start walking from their house to their neighbor's place two houses up the street it's an improvement over driving (from both a community and an environmental viewpoint!).

From the pure consumer viewpoint, walkability and neighborhood amenities are the number one consideration when we move somewhere, so it's nice to have the information on what's around front and center. It's an excellent feature. Even for those who don't walk I'm sure they'll find it useful to know immediately how far it is to the local school, the grocery store, etc. As someone who has done a lot of pasting of addresses into the walkscore site, it's nice to have the work already done.

It's a very interesting concept, and I hope it works out. Still, it would be nice as the site grows if there's a way to sort them by "good/better/best" (or type of certification?) within area. (unless that's already there and I missed it)
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