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Old 12-26-2009, 04:43 PM
 
845 posts, read 2,071,249 times
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I just moved in a new place and was able to get the energy saving, swirly bulbs for 1 buck each. Problem is they are too big for about 12 of my lights like the ceiling fans, bathroom, porch......What's the most economical way to resolve this situation?
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Old 12-27-2009, 04:15 AM
 
Location: Texas
14,078 posts, read 17,657,689 times
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My recommendation would be to just quit using those bulbs. They're NOT environmentally friendly for a couple of reasons:

1. They contain mercury which is released when they go to the dump or are incinerated. In fact, it is illegal to dispose of them in CA. MN, OH, IN, IL, MI and WI. Also, if one accidently breaks, the amount of mercury in them will likely cause you to be temporarily exposed to higher levels of mercury than the EPA thinks safe.

2. They are all made in China, though they bear familiar American brand names. Since the retail cost is significantly higher than regular, incandescent bulbs, the reason for producing them in China isn't cost; it's because of China's lax environmental rules. In other words, in order for you to save the estimated $40 over the life of the bulb, Chinese workers and citizens will have to deal with exposure to mercury and other dangerous chemicals involved in the manufacturing process. That's their problem, you might say, but Chinese air pollution makes it to the USA.
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Old 12-27-2009, 07:12 AM
 
Location: I think my user name clarifies that.
8,293 posts, read 23,162,770 times
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Use regular incandescents, but make sure they're the lowest wattage possible in order to still get the light you need.

Then make sure you turn lights off when they're not in use. The most efficient light bulb is the one that is turned off.
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Old 12-28-2009, 11:05 AM
 
Location: Somewhere in northern Alabama
17,851 posts, read 54,134,324 times
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They make ones that are more compact. It takes a little looking and they might be a little more expensive.
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Old 12-28-2009, 12:06 PM
 
1,327 posts, read 3,344,559 times
Reputation: 1012
Quote:
Originally Posted by stillkit View Post
My recommendation would be to just quit using those bulbs. They're NOT environmentally friendly for a couple of reasons:

1. They contain mercury which is released when they go to the dump or are incinerated. In fact, it is illegal to dispose of them in CA. MN, OH, IN, IL, MI and WI. Also, if one accidently breaks, the amount of mercury in them will likely cause you to be temporarily exposed to higher levels of mercury than the EPA thinks safe.

2. They are all made in China, though they bear familiar American brand names. Since the retail cost is significantly higher than regular, incandescent bulbs, the reason for producing them in China isn't cost; it's because of China's lax environmental rules. In other words, in order for you to save the estimated $40 over the life of the bulb, Chinese workers and citizens will have to deal with exposure to mercury and other dangerous chemicals involved in the manufacturing process. That's their problem, you might say, but Chinese air pollution makes it to the USA.

Ironic, isn't it? You're suppose to be saving money and helping the environment, but you're really not.

I have a big problem with spending $15.00 on a light bulb when I can buy a four pack for $2.00.
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Old 12-28-2009, 12:08 PM
 
1,327 posts, read 3,344,559 times
Reputation: 1012
Quote:
Originally Posted by adolpho View Post
I just moved in a new place and was able to get the energy saving, swirly bulbs for 1 buck each. Problem is they are too big for about 12 of my lights like the ceiling fans, bathroom, porch......What's the most economical way to resolve this situation?

You could always sell them to someone else, or just use them for the lights they work with.
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Old 12-28-2009, 01:14 PM
 
29,988 posts, read 37,200,064 times
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Most light bulbs (and light emitting devices) are made in China anymore be they incandesent, CFL, or LED.

I use only a couple of CFL's for interior lights that come on and stay on the most on auto-timers (security). For light used occasionally or for reading I use incandesent. If you have a problem remembering to turn off lights perhaps a timer or motion detector switch would be worth the investment for the long haul.

The most economical way to resolve the situation is to return the bulbs that do not fit to the store where you bought them the next time you are in the area.
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Old 12-28-2009, 04:09 PM
 
845 posts, read 2,071,249 times
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The ones that do fit were only .99 each at Fry's. The odd sized ones are about 4 bucks each. Ouch. Thought maybe someone could give me THE best retailer to get the oddballs at.
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Old 12-28-2009, 07:53 PM
 
12,577 posts, read 13,304,056 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by stillkit View Post
My recommendation would be to just quit using those bulbs. They're NOT environmentally friendly for a couple of reasons:

1. They contain mercury which is released when they go to the dump or are incinerated. In fact, it is illegal to dispose of them in CA. MN, OH, IN, IL, MI and WI. Also, if one accidently breaks, the amount of mercury in them will likely cause you to be temporarily exposed to higher levels of mercury than the EPA thinks safe.
Solution: Take old CFLs to a hazardous material waste facility. Many municipalities have facilities to collect household chemicals. And what really are the odds of breaking one?

2. They are all made in China, though they bear familiar American brand names. Since the retail cost is significantly higher than regular, incandescent bulbs, the reason for producing them in China isn't cost; it's because of China's lax environmental rules. In other words, in order for you to save the estimated $40 over the life of the bulb, Chinese workers and citizens will have to deal with exposure to mercury and other dangerous chemicals involved in the manufacturing process. That's their problem, you might say, but Chinese air pollution makes it to the USA.
That goes pretty much for any third world country that manufactures our products. Why do you think factories move to Mexico? It's not because of the weather.

I will recommend against the el cheapo CFLs, they don't last long at all. I've had the best service & selection from GE brand.
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Old 12-28-2009, 10:36 PM
 
Location: Texas
14,078 posts, read 17,657,689 times
Reputation: 7720
Quote:
Originally Posted by LABART View Post
Ironic, isn't it? You're suppose to be saving money and helping the environment, but you're really not.

I have a big problem with spending $15.00 on a light bulb when I can buy a four pack for $2.00.

Well, snake oil salesmen used to sell tonic. Now, they sell "green."
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