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Old 01-23-2010, 07:35 PM
 
Location: Houston, texas
15,028 posts, read 10,754,197 times
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Houston based omega protein, the largest commercial harvester of an obscure fish called menhaden(men-hay-den) used mostly for fishmeal and fertilizer and its more palatable product-refined fish oil with its life affirming long chain-omega-3 acids, has for years been accused by conservationists as well as recreational and sport fishers of overfishing menhaden in the gulf of mexico and along the atlantic coast.Critics say omega, by far the largest commercial harvester of menhaden, is destroying marine ecosystems by upsetting the food chain and leaving certain waters plagued with oxygen sucking algae resulting in hypoxic dead zones.In 2009 for possibly the first time government researchers who moniter menhaden populations have data indicating the threshold for overfishing may be occurring.But omega says science is on its side.All the official reports it says indicates menhaden are not being overfished.Facts and figures are in abundance.The problem is deciding whose science and whose truth to believe. For a fish no one eats, the menhaden is incredibly useful.Any thoughts?
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Old 01-23-2010, 09:40 PM
 
Location: Lethbridge, AB
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I think this is one of those wait and see situations. Either gov't or a reputable conservation organization (one of the non-nutbar ones) needs to do some intense and serious monitoring over the coming years (Apprently, the gov't moniters stocks for the whole seaboard, but not the Chesapeake Bay area, where the concerns come from)

If the studies keep coming up declining, they're gonna have to shut it down. Then they can commence argueing about the cause of the decline - whether it's overfishing, habitat issues, whatever.
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Old 01-23-2010, 10:55 PM
 
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US News & World Report yet to be accused in the left leaning, anti-corporate etc. tendencies:

Big fish of all kinds are in trouble: In 2003, Myers and marine ecologist Boris Worm reported that 90 percent of all the large ocean fish--from tunas and swordfish to cod and halibut--are gone, primarily because of overfishing.

Overfishing: Sharks in the soup - US News and World Report

Oceans are becoming barren fast, we only can wait and see remaining 10% gone in the next 30 years. Overfishing began not yesterday, some of us may be "lucky" to witness the end of it.
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Old 01-24-2010, 02:36 AM
 
Location: Lethbridge, AB
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I said a reputable conservation organization. You gave me a news outlet. That's not the same thing at all.

Also, that article you linked to is about sharks and other large predatory fish, which these are not.
The populations of this particular fish are stable in all but one area of the Atlantic seaboard. There's no need to panic yet.
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Old 01-25-2010, 03:52 PM
 
Location: The Woods
16,958 posts, read 22,274,224 times
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Over-fishing tends to be a localized thing. Areas are overfished, but the entire ocean isn't necessarily at risk.

One theory for some species I've read is the increasing whale populations may be lowering fish populations. Might be one part of the puzzle. Pollution is likely another.
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Old 01-25-2010, 05:15 PM
 
Location: Lethbridge, AB
1,132 posts, read 1,654,121 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post
Over-fishing tends to be a localized thing. Areas are overfished, but the entire ocean isn't necessarily at risk.

One theory for some species I've read is the increasing whale populations may be lowering fish populations. Might be one part of the puzzle. Pollution is likely another.
Either of those could be. Are there whales in Chesapeake? I don't know much about the area.
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Old 01-25-2010, 06:50 PM
 
2,449 posts, read 4,813,992 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post
Over-fishing tends to be a localized thing. Areas are overfished, but the entire ocean isn't necessarily at risk.

One theory for some species I've read is the increasing whale populations may be lowering fish populations. Might be one part of the puzzle. Pollution is likely another.
I've heard that argument from the Japanese whaling industry.
Have the whale populations somehow rebounded higher then before they were well protected? I guess they could if predators such as sharks are depleted as well, but I doubt it. If whale populations are still below historic levels (which they are), then oceanfish should be in no more risk than before. But they're worse.
Maybe the entire ocean isn't at risk, but enough is that it has major impacts on humans and ecology.
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Old 01-27-2010, 11:36 AM
 
Location: The Woods
16,958 posts, read 22,274,224 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bluebeard View Post
I've heard that argument from the Japanese whaling industry.
Have the whale populations somehow rebounded higher then before they were well protected? I guess they could if predators such as sharks are depleted as well, but I doubt it. If whale populations are still below historic levels (which they are), then oceanfish should be in no more risk than before. But they're worse.
Maybe the entire ocean isn't at risk, but enough is that it has major impacts on humans and ecology.
Some species have rebounded quite a bit, some have not. I've heard some talk of taking sperm whales off the endangered species list I believe. Minke whales are possibly over-populated now.

Yes the areas at risk are rather significant. For instance, the Atlantic salmon can no longer be commercially fished in the U.S. That's a pretty significant loss alone.
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Old 01-29-2010, 02:00 AM
 
Location: Sound Beach
2,160 posts, read 6,715,518 times
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One of the problems is that this is a world wide issue...with only local actions. One of the ones I read about lately was a ban on grouper fishing in the FL Keys. This will be a big hit for the fishing/tourism biz who rely on chartered boats. However...the problem was so severe that it needed to be done.
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Old 01-29-2010, 09:12 AM
 
2,449 posts, read 4,813,992 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post
Some species have rebounded quite a bit, some have not. I've heard some talk of taking sperm whales off the endangered species list I believe. Minke whales are possibly over-populated now.

Yes the areas at risk are rather significant. For instance, the Atlantic salmon can no longer be commercially fished in the U.S. That's a pretty significant loss alone.
Right, but its a jump from "Atlantic salmon can no longer be fished" to "this is because of ballooning whale populations eating up the ocean's fish"
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