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Old 01-31-2010, 04:31 AM
 
Location: Between Heaven And Hell.
11,240 posts, read 7,516,128 times
Reputation: 14489

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Deforestation and Reforestation.

How do you feel about it?
Do you think that itís time for our own respective Governments to regulate more?
We can all see the effects deforestation is having ( flooding, landslides, silted rivers, falling water table levels, reduced air quality, loss of natural habitat ), so why no action?
Most land that forests are on is of little or no use for agriculture, so why is very little being done to replant?
How long can this go on for ever hungry industry?
Our Governments tell developing countries how to behave, but should they not lead by example?
There will come a point at which the costs outweigh the benefits, and this may have already come and gone.
So much to consider, or is there?
What do you think?
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Old 01-31-2010, 03:16 PM
 
Location: The Woods
16,961 posts, read 22,280,061 times
Reputation: 9075
Here in Northern New England, a field or any piece of cleared land left unworked will be a forest again within 10 years. You have to constantly work the land to stop the trees from taking over. We have far more forest than 100 years ago and in fact, our dense, overgrown forests, are poor wildlife habitat and our population of deer, bobcats, foxes, rabbits/hares, etc., is decreasing steadily. Endangered species including lynx and in Vermont, marten (not endangered in Maine) need more clearing or burned areas for habitat or they will not recover. We need more open fields, meadows, and areas within the forests that are cleared or burned, for wildlife. Mature forests are not ideal for most of the wildlife.

You are incorrect on forestland as bad farmland, as generally, former forestlands are the best farmland. We can maintain a balance between cleared areas and forested areas. We shouldn't go to either extreme (no clearing, or, no forest) as that is not logical.
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Old 01-31-2010, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Lethbridge, AB
1,132 posts, read 1,654,543 times
Reputation: 974
In Western Canada we do quite a bit of replanting, but it's not really back to original quality. They just seed trees that they like, so a new crop will be ready, so to speak. I don't know if it's regulated or not, but the company usually pays for the replanting.

To do actual reclamation work is expensive and time consuming, and most companies don't want to put in the money for something they themselves don't really get any profit out of.

There's been some studying of burning everything off after a clear cut, since the forests need to burn now and again anyway. I don't know what's come of it though.

It's a tough call though. As much as I'd like to see a full reclamation done on those sites, if they're just going to cut there again, there's not much point, as by the time the full ecosystem is recovered, the fast growing species they would have planted to begin with will be ready for cutting.
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Old 01-31-2010, 03:36 PM
 
Location: Lethbridge, AB
1,132 posts, read 1,654,543 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post

You are incorrect on forestland as bad farmland, as generally, former forestlands are the best farmland. We can maintain a balance between cleared areas and forested areas. We shouldn't go to either extreme (no clearing, or, no forest) as that is not logical.

It's the opposite in Western Canada. Forest land makes terrible farmland. There's basically no A horizon in the soil, and the organic matter doesn't really get broken down. So, the soil isn't very good for crops.
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Old 01-31-2010, 04:05 PM
 
48,516 posts, read 83,978,960 times
Reputation: 18050
Here in texas the piney woods of East Texas have been replanted regularly for decades. Luckily yellow pine grows very quickly here.
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Old 02-01-2010, 12:19 PM
 
Location: Greensboro
627 posts, read 1,864,582 times
Reputation: 432
Cattle and soybean production (to feed cattle) causes a majority of the distruction of the Amazon rain forest.

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Old 02-01-2010, 12:29 PM
 
Location: Lethbridge, AB
1,132 posts, read 1,654,543 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by d_Random View Post
Cattle and soybean production (to feed cattle) causes a majority of the distruction of the Amazon rain forest.
While I agree that cutting rainforest to raise cattle on is silly, that video is also pretty bad. Much of Western North America was already filled with large ruminants prior to intensive cattle ranching.
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Old 02-01-2010, 03:42 PM
 
Location: The Woods
16,961 posts, read 22,280,061 times
Reputation: 9075
Quote:
Originally Posted by Stubblejumper View Post
While I agree that cutting rainforest to raise cattle on is silly, that video is also pretty bad. Much of Western North America was already filled with large ruminants prior to intensive cattle ranching.
Yep, the massive buffalo herds alone had a major impact on the environment out there. Add in elk, deer, etc...
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Old 02-01-2010, 05:21 PM
 
Location: Lethbridge, AB
1,132 posts, read 1,654,543 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arctichomesteader View Post
Yep, the massive buffalo herds alone had a major impact on the environment out there. Add in elk, deer, etc...
Exactly. And if you take large grazers off the grasslands, it falls to pieces.

The Sierra Club bought a piece of land up here a while ago, to return it to it's "natural state", which meant no cattle, or other grazers. Biodiversity plummeted. The whole chunk of land basically died.

They may be worse suited than Buffalo, but they can still fill that niche.
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Old 02-01-2010, 06:21 PM
 
Location: Wyoming
9,421 posts, read 17,408,474 times
Reputation: 14102
Quote:
Originally Posted by BECLAZONE View Post
Deforestation and Reforestation.

How do you feel about it?
Do you think that itís time for our own respective Governments to regulate more?
We can all see the effects deforestation is having ( flooding, landslides, silted rivers, falling water table levels, reduced air quality, loss of natural habitat ), so why no action?
Most land that forests are on is of little or no use for agriculture, so why is very little being done to replant?
How long can this go on for ever hungry industry?
Our Governments tell developing countries how to behave, but should they not lead by example?
There will come a point at which the costs outweigh the benefits, and this may have already come and gone.
So much to consider, or is there?
What do you think?

What forest land are you talking about? Most of the problems you mention occur following forest fires, which in turn occur in large part because of old growth forests. To the best of my knowledge, any clear cutting that's been done in recent years must be accompanied by replanting new trees. Am I wrong?
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