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Old 05-02-2010, 04:49 PM
 
Location: Austin, TX
16,722 posts, read 40,835,478 times
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I thought this was pretty interesting, since I grew in Wyoming/Montana and have always admired the rustic style of log cabin structures.

Best Green Houses - Back to the Future: A guest cabin near Yellowstone asks, “What’s the style of sustainability?”

It was built near Big Sky, Montana. The style of the house borrows much from the Historic structures in Glacier National Park and in Wyoming, at Yellowstone National Park. I assume some of you will be interested in it.



Quote:
Best Green Houses: Back to the Future: A guest cabin near Yellowstone asks, “What’s the style of sustainability?”
Best Green Houses: Headwaters Camp
Dan Joseph Architects
April 2010
Readers located in the Rocky Mountain region of North America may have spotted the most recent issue of Mountain Living magazine, which announced that Headwaters Camp, a 1,800-square-foot, LEED-Platinum guest cabin located in Big Sky, Montana, had won one of the magazine’s Responsible Development Awards. The accolades seem fitting for Mountain Living, which covers a whole spectrum of homes but regularly features designs with traditional trappings. The house’s maker, Daniel Turvey, advocates for inclusion here, too.

Sustainability is generally conflated with a Modernist aesthetic, says the Bozeman, Montana–based architect, adding, “I think sustainability works in all vernaculars. Sustainable practice can be exercised on every level.” With Headwaters Camp, sustainability has been paired to a rusticity inspired by the National Park Service architecture of Stanley Underwood and Robert Reamer…

…Turvey says that, while his past projects have incorporated passive sustainable strategies as a nod to good design generally, he has not had the opportunity to prove his claim with active green technologies. For Headwaters Camp, clients Melissa and Todd Thomson insisted upon LEED certification, and considered active technology from the start—mandating fishing ponds and streams with enough capacity to permit a closed-loop heating and cooling system for Headwaters Camp and a yet unbuilt main house. Large enough, in this case, tops 1 million gallons water-source heat pump…
Other energy conservation and green features include...
  • an air-exchange system
  • recycles graywater for dual-flush toilets and irrigation uses
  • photovoltaic array mounted to the roof of an adjacent barn
  • firebox and chimney chase that block air infiltration
  • air tight construction
  • triple-glazed windows
  • closed-cell spray-foam and batt-overlay insulation
  • exterior includes standing-dead timbers and trees locally
  • dimensional exterior rafters were salvaged from demolition materials
  • logs’ skins clad the roof of the residence’s outdoor room,
  • remaining wood scraps were chipped and sent to a biomass power plant in Idaho
  • reclaimed dimensional timber, barnwood siding, hutch, a trough once used for kneading dough
  • an array of shed antlers (comprising the interior stair's balusters)
  • reused materials clad almost every square foot of Headwaters Camp

Many people in Wyoming have been building much of their cabins, ranches and homes in these ways for years, using reclaimed materials, interesting how it has now become fashionable.
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Old 05-03-2010, 09:35 AM
 
Location: Illinois
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Awesome!!! Thanks for sharing.
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Old 05-18-2010, 09:40 PM
 
Location: Denver
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I disagree that sustainable building has a "modern aesthetic". This might be true of developers and urban type builders but if you look at earth bermed buildings, cob buildings, other hand built but energy efficient buildings, there are a lot of different aesthetics. In fact by reading on the construction methods of these old hippy trends I see that many of them have developed over time into reliable methods for low cost housebuilding

I've also learned a lot about how to make my own home warmer, tighter, and "greener".
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Old 05-19-2010, 05:36 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
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As that is called a "camp" I would have expected something more like a 800 sq.ft. building with a kitchen area, a small bath and sleeping in the loft. 1800 sqft is bigger than many current houses. That is not a guest house, it is a guest palace.

My idea of green is a small house made of precut stressed skin insulated panels covered with stirilized slab wood siding with heated floors and lots of south facing windows heated with a stove fueled by scrap wood or coal. Electricity would be provided by a grid connection or a stand alone diesel powered co-generation unit burning waste cooking oil.
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Old 05-19-2010, 10:10 AM
 
Location: Vermont
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Greg i agree but one of my questions/concerns is can new construction sort of "overtake" old construction by being so much more efficient/tight, etc.
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Old 05-19-2010, 11:15 AM
 
Location: Londonderry, NH
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New will overtake old methods if they produce the same or better quality housing cheaper and are allowed by the building codes.
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Old 05-19-2010, 01:18 PM
 
Location: 125 Years Too Late...
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I admire some of the design innovations... but, way too big and high tech for me. If the goal in this case is 'minimizing the impact,' it needs at least 1000 sq ft less space. I'll bet a 'non-green' home of 600 sq ft would actually be greener than this effort.

Note: I'm not saying it's not a nice place. But in my opinion, it's practically a royal palace. Let's not label a 'fuel efficient' Suburban as a 55 mpg Metro just because the Suburban gets 0.5 mpg better than last year's model...
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Old 05-20-2010, 10:01 AM
 
Location: Austin, TX
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It is my impression that the name "Headwaters Camp" existed before this house was built there. It would be pointless to give it a different name. Also I know of several large old log cabins in Wyoming that are larger then this. Few people are willing to live in a 600 SF house, especially when they have family. So its downright silly and counter productive to criticize someone for making such a serious effort to build something that is both "green" and large enough to accommodate their needs. We should applaud efforts in this direction rather then discourage them.
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Old 05-20-2010, 01:02 PM
 
Location: 125 Years Too Late...
10,851 posts, read 10,524,951 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CptnRn View Post
... large enough to accommodate their needs.
Change that to 'wants' and I'll buy your argument. Seventy-five years ago it was perfectly average for a family of four or five to live in 600 sq ft. And that was the case for many years before as well for the average family. Half of my family generation before me did it. And they never really thought much about it as I remember. That was just the 'norm' of the time. Each child does NOT need a 15x20 bedroom to him/her self. Once upon a time there was a thing called a bunk bed and shared bedrooms. The big thing nowadays is that the 'norm' has changed. But 'norm' or 'want' is not synonymous with 'need.'

Personally, I've never lived in anything over about 850 sq ft, and that gave me agoraphobia. Not to mention, I'm heating and cooling and paying for all that unused space. Plus those spaces tend to collect unused junk. Before jumping on me, keep in mind that I'm all for anyone living in anything they want--big or small.

BUT... BUT... there are many people out there who just assume the norm and never think much about it. Many don't need all that space. And if you can get them to think about it a bit, it actually makes sense to them to live in smaller spaces. Those are the sorts of people who benefit by having someone like me expose them to the idea (I'm trying to develop a website right now that will feature these small homes and house plans and ideas)... because they sure as hell will not hear about it from Joe American or the housing industry... or the power companies... or the gas companies... or from anyone who profits from over-consumption or peddling the 'norm.' It's like putting someone into a giant 20-seater diesel 1000 HP pickup truck (that I see all too often these days) who really only needs an economy car to go to the grocery store once a week.
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Old 05-20-2010, 01:20 PM
 
Location: The Woods
16,935 posts, read 22,198,202 times
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That "camp" is still a bit large and modern in style for my tastes though it is miles ahead of the average plastic mcmansion.

My plans have been for a log structure based more or less on original 18th century cape cod style homes here in New England (incl. the central chimney for fireplaces/woodstove/brick oven). Probably hewn logs, dovetailed notches, probably eventually covered in hand split shakes or clapboards. Small, cozy, efficient and quite "green" the way I plan to build. People in recent decades have begun to think they "need" far larger houses than they really do.
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