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Greensboro, Winston-Salem, High Point The Triad Area
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Old 05-30-2015, 07:44 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinadawg2 View Post
Except that the constituent counties of MSA's frequently make no sense. For example, Brunswick County was recently taken out of the Wilmington MSA and moved to the Myrtle Beach MSA. Changes like that makes it impossible to compare MSA growth over time. Another example is the triad...at one time Alamance, Guilford and Forsyth Counties (plus others) were all in the same MSA. Now, they are all in separate ones.
Although the example of Brunswick County going to the Myrtle Beach MSA puzzles me based on the data I've seen in light of the criteria for MSA inclusion, it's not frequently that the constituent counties make no sense. As far as MSA sbreaking apart and combining, that's due to changes in the criteria used by the OMB. However, in all cases, MSA growth can be looked at historically using the same present counties or counties as they were added or subtracted. It's not perfect, but simply looking at one county per urban area makes a lot less sense to me, especially in dense areas where counties are pretty much saturated. And how would that work with respect to independent cities that aren't part of any county, such as those in Virginia?
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Old 05-30-2015, 08:00 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Although the example of Brunswick County going to the Myrtle Beach MSA puzzles me based on the data I've seen in light of the criteria for MSA inclusion, it's not frequently that the constituent counties make no sense. As far as MSA sbreaking apart and combining, that's due to changes in the criteria used by the OMB. However, in all cases, MSA growth can be looked at historically using the same present counties or counties as they were added or subtracted. It's not perfect, but simply looking at one county per urban area makes a lot less sense to me, especially in dense areas where counties are pretty much saturated. And how would that work with respect to independent cities that aren't part of any county, such as those in Virginia?
Or a city that is in more than one county?
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Old 05-30-2015, 08:14 PM
 
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Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
Or a city that is in more than one county?
Right. I've seen arguments for MSAs and urbanized areas to accurately gauge growth of urban areas, but never the primary county.
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Old 05-30-2015, 08:23 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Right. I've seen arguments for MSAs and urbanized areas to accurately gauge growth of urban areas, but never the primary county.
Same here.
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Old 10-20-2016, 03:44 PM
 
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Originally Posted by xxWolfpackxx View Post
The biggest problem with the Dash is the crooked deal when building it and the prices afterward. They scammed the city by stopping it halfway through as an eye sore next to the interstate which basically blackmailed the city into making sure it got finished. Then after it was built the prices were outrageous (idk if they have changed yet, I hope so). It was $14 a ticket for outfield seats at a single A team in Winston Salem. I can go watch the championship triple a team durham bulls for $6 outside of the capital. Why on Earth are the single a "Dash" (Warthogs at heart) worth more than twice as much as a championship triple a team in a larger city?
Durham isn't that much bigger than Winston, and on the flip side of things, Forsyth County is a lot bigger than Durham county.
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Old 10-21-2016, 01:34 PM
 
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Originally Posted by Hitman Hart View Post
Durham isn't that much bigger than Winston, and on the flip side of things, Forsyth County is a lot bigger than Durham county.
That's true. The only way I can see that translating to cheaper tickets is that there are more baseball fans in Durham or there are more paying baseball fans in Durham. Although, it has a similar history and is of comparable size to Winston; it's wealthier. It's proximity to Raleigh and Chapel Hill make any comparison kind of unfair. One thing I love about the Bulls ballpark is that Tobacco Road restaurant has outdoor seating that gives patrons a great view of the game. From what my friends says, downtown Durham was depressed and depressing in the 90s/early aughts just like Winston was. You wouldn't see any activity after 6pm. But I do like how they've revitalized the area n terms of layout. Most of the restaurants/bars are near the ballpark and Durham Performing Arts Center.
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Old 10-21-2016, 05:12 PM
 
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Originally Posted by nita0312 View Post
That's true. The only way I can see that translating to cheaper tickets is that there are more baseball fans in Durham or there are more paying baseball fans in Durham. Although, it has a similar history and is of comparable size to Winston; it's wealthier. It's proximity to Raleigh and Chapel Hill make any comparison kind of unfair. One thing I love about the Bulls ballpark is that Tobacco Road restaurant has outdoor seating that gives patrons a great view of the game. From what my friends says, downtown Durham was depressed and depressing in the 90s/early aughts just like Winston was. You wouldn't see any activity after 6pm. But I do like how they've revitalized the area n terms of layout. Most of the restaurants/bars are near the ballpark and Durham Performing Arts Center.
The Bulls are also Triple-A baseball...they have a more talented product on the field and can charge more for tickets. I would say that's the major difference between the two teams. The Dash are High Single-A. I'm not sure there is a great deal more wealth in Durham than in Winston-Salem so you would need to post a link to that information. The metric I like best to compare city sizes in urban area because it gives a good picture of the actual size of the city: Winston-Salem 391,000 and Durham 347,000...very close to the same size.

A great story in Politico Magazine about the emergence of downtown Winston-Salem and the massive investment it has seen over the past 2 decades:
How Tech Helped Winston-Salem Quit Tobacco - POLITICO Magazine

Quote:
Today, the skeletal remains of Winston-Salem’s manufacturing history have been reanimated as labs, co-working space, university classrooms and swank loft apartments. People do yoga on the lawns and sip coffee under the umbrellas of a new downtown park completed last year in the shadow of the R.J. Reynolds company’s coal-fired power plant, now being transformed into restaurants and research labs. The expanding 200-acre research complex—dubbed the Wake Forest Innovation Quarter—employs more than 3,100 in 65 companies and five academic institutions, and is preparing to more than double its footprint. Trade Street is now a thriving arts-and-entertainment quarter, a shopping and nightlife destination, just as it was in the postwar years. The city’s once-neglected 1920s skyscrapers have been transformed into apartments and a hip Kimpton hotel. Over $1.6 billion has been invested in downtown over the past 15 years, much of it the result of the creation of the Innovation Quarter, the nation’s fastest growing research park which has its most famous rival, the Research Triangle near Raleigh, looking over its shoulder...
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Old 10-22-2016, 02:10 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
The Bulls are also Triple-A baseball...they have a more talented product on the field and can charge more for tickets. I would say that's the major difference between the two teams. The Dash are High Single-A. I'm not sure there is a great deal more wealth in Durham than in Winston-Salem so you would need to post a link to that information. The metric I like best to compare city sizes in urban area because it gives a good picture of the actual size of the city: Winston-Salem 391,000 and Durham 347,000...very close to the same size.

A great story in Politico Magazine about the emergence of downtown Winston-Salem and the massive investment it has seen over the past 2 decades:
How Tech Helped Winston-Salem Quit Tobacco - POLITICO Magazine
Median household income in Durham is substantially higher than in Winston. Durham's is over 50K and Winston was just 37K for 2013.

http://www.city-data.com/income/inco...-Carolina.html

http://www.city-data.com/city/Winsto...-Carolina.html

I don't know jack squat about baseball. I didn't realize there were minor league divisions, but it makes sense.

Pretty cool article and Winston is definitely on the upswing, but it'll take a while to get any where near that RTP level that will in turn raise that median income. We're below the state median, but thankfully they're making decisions to change that.
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Old 10-29-2016, 03:19 PM
 
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Originally Posted by nita0312 View Post
Median household income in Durham is substantially higher than in Winston. Durham's is over 50K and Winston was just 37K for 2013.

http://www.city-data.com/income/inco...-Carolina.html

http://www.city-data.com/city/Winsto...-Carolina.html

I don't know jack squat about baseball. I didn't realize there were minor league divisions, but it makes sense.

Pretty cool article and Winston is definitely on the upswing, but it'll take a while to get any where near that RTP level that will in turn raise that median income. We're below the state median, but thankfully they're making decisions to change that.
Again, is that income statistic for the city-limits, the urban area, or the MSA? I assume it's the city-limits and I don't usually recognize city-limits data as valid because those are jut arbitrary boundaries set by the city itself and don't serve any real purpose. The UA or MSA are all set by the Census Bureau and are uniform across the board. I don't quite believe that the Durham UA/MSA is more affluent than the W-S UA/MSA and I totally believe that the income disparity of the city-limits would even out between the two if the UA or MSA were included as they should be...W-S has some very poor areas within the city that are negated quite well when you include the entire area. It's truly hard to make real judgements about any city just based on city-limits alone.

The city itself has already turned things around nicely. The IQ will never been what RTP is and I don't believe it's goal is to be that large, but to be a strong force in the local economy and build out to the goals set up at the beginning. I know the article listed RTP as the IQ's "rival", but I wouldn't consider it a real rival at all - just a much larger, more suburban and world-renowned research park (only the largest in the nation/world) compared to a the relatively new, up-and-coming urban IQ that is growing by leaps and bounds but is never expected to reach the level of RTP.

Yeah, minor league baseball runs the gamut from low-A (and probably lower than that) to high-A to AA to AAA and then to the majors. There may be even more divisions than that. Durham and Charlotte are the only AAA teams in NC that I know of.
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Old 11-01-2016, 09:44 PM
 
421 posts, read 292,681 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
Again, is that income statistic for the city-limits, the urban area, or the MSA? I assume it's the city-limits and I don't usually recognize city-limits data as valid because those are jut arbitrary boundaries set by the city itself and don't serve any real purpose. The UA or MSA are all set by the Census Bureau and are uniform across the board. I don't quite believe that the Durham UA/MSA is more affluent than the W-S UA/MSA and I totally believe that the income disparity of the city-limits would even out between the two if the UA or MSA were included as they should be...W-S has some very poor areas within the city that are negated quite well when you include the entire area. It's truly hard to make real judgements about any city just based on city-limits alone.

The city itself has already turned things around nicely. The IQ will never been what RTP is and I don't believe it's goal is to be that large, but to be a strong force in the local economy and build out to the goals set up at the beginning. I know the article listed RTP as the IQ's "rival", but I wouldn't consider it a real rival at all - just a much larger, more suburban and world-renowned research park (only the largest in the nation/world) compared to a the relatively new, up-and-coming urban IQ that is growing by leaps and bounds but is never expected to reach the level of RTP.

Yeah, minor league baseball runs the gamut from low-A (and probably lower than that) to high-A to AA to AAA and then to the majors. There may be even more divisions than that. Durham and Charlotte are the only AAA teams in NC that I know of.
Yes, there are even Rookie leagues. Burlington actually has a team in the Appalachian League (the Burlington Royals). Danville also has the Danville Braves from the same league. Below that, there are also developmental leagues (most of those are in Florida).

There's three levels of Single-A: Short-season A (no teams in NC), Single-A (Greensboro Grasshoppers are an example), and Advanced-A (Winston-Salem Dash are an example). There's also AA (Richmond Flying Squirrels) and then AAA above that (Durham and Charlotte are examples). And then of course, the MLB is above that. I don't think I have to name examples here, as if you don't know you probably couldn't care less about baseball.
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