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Greensboro, Winston-Salem, High Point The Triad Area
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Old 11-02-2016, 07:11 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
Again, is that income statistic for the city-limits, the urban area, or the MSA? I assume it's the city-limits and I don't usually recognize city-limits data as valid because those are jut arbitrary boundaries set by the city itself and don't serve any real purpose. The UA or MSA are all set by the Census Bureau and are uniform across the board. I don't quite believe that the Durham UA/MSA is more affluent than the W-S UA/MSA and I totally believe that the income disparity of the city-limits would even out between the two if the UA or MSA were included as they should be...W-S has some very poor areas within the city that are negated quite well when you include the entire area. It's truly hard to make real judgements about any city just based on city-limits alone.
Winston-Salem MSA
Per capita income: $26,173
Median household income: $45,908

Durham-Chapel Hill MSA
Per capita income: $32,362
Median household income: $54,160
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Old 11-02-2016, 07:23 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Winston-Salem MSA
Per capita income: $26,173
Median household income: $45,908

Durham-Chapel Hill MSA
Per capita income: $32,362
Median household income: $54,160
Looking at it on a county to county basis, which makes the most sense imo, Durham has higher income levels than Forsyth, but not by a lot. The Durham-Chapel Hill MSA number is greatly influenced by the fact that Orange County has the highest income levels in the state.
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Old 11-02-2016, 11:55 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
Again, is that income statistic for the city-limits, the urban area, or the MSA? I assume it's the city-limits and I don't usually recognize city-limits data as valid because those are jut arbitrary boundaries set by the city itself and don't serve any real purpose. The UA or MSA are all set by the Census Bureau and are uniform across the board. I don't quite believe that the Durham UA/MSA is more affluent than the W-S UA/MSA and I totally believe that the income disparity of the city-limits would even out between the two if the UA or MSA were included as they should be...W-S has some very poor areas within the city that are negated quite well when you include the entire area. It's truly hard to make real judgements about any city just based on city-limits alone.
Quote:
Originally Posted by Mutiny77 View Post
Winston-Salem MSA
Per capita income: $26,173
Median household income: $45,908

Durham-Chapel Hill MSA
Per capita income: $32,362
Median household income: $54,160
A few clicks across the different areas and they look as skewed as political district maps. Burlington is just Alamance county.
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Old 11-02-2016, 01:55 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WFW&P View Post
A few clicks across the different areas and they look as skewed as political district maps. Burlington is just Alamance county.
Exactly, I'm not sure what constitutes an MSA or a CSA or whatever. It strikes me as odd that the Triad and Triangle are essentially split into two different MSAs, but Hampton Roads in VA is just one (despite being geographically split up by a 5-7 mile wide river).
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Old 11-02-2016, 02:23 PM
 
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Originally Posted by HRVT View Post
Exactly, I'm not sure what constitutes an MSA or a CSA or whatever. It strikes me as odd that the Triad and Triangle are essentially split into two different MSAs, but Hampton Roads in VA is just one (despite being geographically split up by a 5-7 mile wide river).
Charlotte MSA or CSA extends into SC, go figure that one.
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Old 11-02-2016, 02:48 PM
 
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Originally Posted by WFW&P View Post
Charlotte MSA or CSA extends into SC, go figure that one.

Thats not really that hard to understand. MSA's are based on things like commuting patterns and other economic ties. State lines don't matter in that scenario. Lots of MSA's cross state lines...New York, Chicago, DC, Virginia Beach, Memphis...
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Old 11-02-2016, 04:30 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WFW&P View Post
Charlotte MSA or CSA extends into SC, go figure that one.
Actually the Hampton Roads MSA is even larger than I thought. In addition to Norfolk/Va Beach/Suffolk/Porstmouth AND Hampton/Newport News/Williamsburg (across the 5-7 mile wide river), Hampton Roads includes two North Carolina counties AND Gloucester County VA (which is across a mile wide river from Hampton/Newport News/Williamsburg). How does that all become one MSA while Greensboro and Winston-Salem are separate?

As far as commuting patterns, I'm not sure who in the world is commuting from Gloucester County, VA to Norfolk/Va Beach? Not only do you have to cross two separate rivers, but the traffic the entire way is a bear. On a good day and depending where in Gloucester and where in Va Beach/Norfolk, that's a 1 to 2 hour drive. With traffic, that can become a 3 hour drive. No way that should be one MSA. From northern Gloucester to southern Currituck County, you're looking at a 2 and a half hour drive on a good day.

ADD: I just calculated northern Gloucester to southern Currituck at 2 hours and 5 minutes at least and 114 miles. For comparison, Benson, NC (SE of Raleigh) to Hillsborough, NC (NW of Durham) is 1 hour and 5 minutes on a good day and only 70 miles.
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Old 11-02-2016, 07:40 PM
 
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Originally Posted by BC1960 View Post
Thats not really that hard to understand. MSA's are based on things like commuting patterns and other economic ties. State lines don't matter in that scenario. Lots of MSA's cross state lines...New York, Chicago, DC, Virginia Beach, Memphis...
So you're trying to tell me nobody leaves or comes to Alamance county?
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Old 11-03-2016, 05:59 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WFW&P View Post
So you're trying to tell me nobody leaves or comes to Alamance county?
???????

I'm not trying to tell you anything of the sort, and I have no idea why you'd ask me that, or really what you mean. The Greensboro/Winston-Salem/High Point Combined Statistical Area (CSA) consists of the following Counties:

Alamance, Davidson, Davie, Forsyth, Guilford, Randolph, Rockingham, Stokes, Surry and Yadkin Counties.

It is further broken up into 5 Metropolitan Statistical Areas (MSA):

Greensboro/High Point (Guilford, Randolph and Rockingham), Winston-Salem (Forsyth, Davie, Stokes and Yadkin), Thomasville/Lexington (Davidson), Burlington (Alamance) and Mt. Airy (Stokes).

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/North_...tistical_areas


Edit: I should have used the "CSA" definition in my earlier post (#166)

Last edited by BC1960; 11-03-2016 at 06:11 AM..
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Old 11-03-2016, 07:31 AM
 
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Originally Posted by HRVT View Post
Actually the Hampton Roads MSA is even larger than I thought. In addition to Norfolk/Va Beach/Suffolk/Porstmouth AND Hampton/Newport News/Williamsburg (across the 5-7 mile wide river), Hampton Roads includes two North Carolina counties AND Gloucester County VA (which is across a mile wide river from Hampton/Newport News/Williamsburg). How does that all become one MSA while Greensboro and Winston-Salem are separate?
It has to do with commuting patterns. The Hampton Roads MSA consists of seven cities all neighboring each other, and Virginia also has that independent city setup (cities are independent and not part of any county) which influences things I'm sure.
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