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Greensboro, Winston-Salem, High Point The Triad Area
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Old 12-23-2015, 12:13 AM
 
16 posts, read 15,886 times
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Hi all,

I'm wondering if anyone on here who has relocated from a dry climate like AZ, CA, etc. can give a perspective on the humidity?

I've done a lot of research on moving to Greensboro, and LOVE everything I've seen so far. Nice people, 4 seasons, great housing market, decent schools, absolutely beautiful scenery, but everyone comments on the humidity. Is it really choking awful? And is it only during summer that it is usually bad, or does it go longer? I'm more than willing to trade 7-8 months of 90's+ dry heat temps for 3 months of hot and humid I'm planning a week long trip in mid-March, but just looking to get more info on the humidity factor.

Also, any suggestions on areas to look at to live while visiting would be great. Areas to consider would be good schools, safe for a 15 year old girl to walk home from a friend's house in daylight, home price can go up to $250K but I'd prefer to keep it much lower ~ $150K if possible (please laugh and tell me if that price range isn't possible for safe area/good schools), it can be in Greensboro or a surrounding community; I'm open to commuting 30-45 min each way to get the good schools/safety. And just to clarify, when I say good schools, i mean about 8/10 rating, not looking for a top academy. Anything anyone can offer is greatly appreciated.

Thank you!
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Old 12-23-2015, 05:17 AM
 
Location: The Emerald City
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I'm NC born and raised, but I did live in Pinetop for a year once. The humidity is different, but I don't think it's choking. That dryness was uncomfortable to me. I guess it's all in your perspective. The beautiful scenery is partly due to it!

There are plenty of neighborhoods that fit your criteria. I grew up in Green Valley close enough to Friendly Shopping Center to walk there. I'm sure there are houses there in your budget.

DM me if you want the name of my friend (and childhood neighbor) who is a real estate agent. She knows everything.
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Old 12-23-2015, 07:05 PM
 
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The humidity can be stifling depending on your tolerance but, the good news being it goes away with the arrival of fall. On occasion it arrives earlier in spring so instead of 3 months you might get 4-5 months. If you have ever visited a Gulf state and was able to tolerate the humidity there you would be fine here.
To get weather geeky, dew points play the most critical role in how sticky it feels. I often see humidity levels around 50% in winter but, due to low dew points it's dry and comfortable.
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Old 12-23-2015, 08:17 PM
 
16 posts, read 15,886 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by WFW&P View Post
The humidity can be stifling depending on your tolerance but, the good news being it goes away with the arrival of fall. On occasion it arrives earlier in spring so instead of 3 months you might get 4-5 months. If you have ever visited a Gulf state and was able to tolerate the humidity there you would be fine here.
To get weather geeky, dew points play the most critical role in how sticky it feels. I often see humidity levels around 50% in winter but, due to low dew points it's dry and comfortable.
Ok thanks. We did go to Florida last winter and the night we arrived it was 80 and felt very humid but it was just uncomfortable, not terrible. I've also had the pleasure of visiting Houston/Galveston in July, that was pretty bad but we were still able to go to do outdoor activities.

Thank you both for the info, I'm looking forward to visiting in a few months!
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Old 12-24-2015, 06:23 AM
 
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There's a real difference beween Orlando humidity and Western NC humidity. Eastern NC not so much.
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Old 12-24-2015, 06:53 AM
 
Location: Southport
4,639 posts, read 4,810,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by arstal View Post
There's a real difference beween Orlando humidity and Western NC humidity. Eastern NC not so much.
Greensboro isn't in western, nor eastern NC. Greensboro is very humid in the summer. The OP needs to experience it firsthand in order to determine if its acceptable to her.
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Old 12-26-2015, 10:00 PM
 
Location: Chandler, AZ
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I grew up in Greensboro and have lived in the Phoenix, AZ, area for almost 4 years. Your experience in Florida in the winter is pretty close to what it's like in NC in the summer. There are a few days scattered around (not back to back) that hit 90 and above; those days feel muggy and uncomfortable, plus your shirt will be soaked if you stay outside for any amount of time. NC never gets as hot or uncomfortable as Texas or Florida. Those same 90 plus degree days in Texas and Florida are the norm, nearly everyday, for about 4 or 5 months. In Greensboro, there might be a half dozen or a dozen 90 plus degree days sprinkled around from about mid May until the end of September. In addition, there are so many trees in Greensboro that you're in the shade a lot of the time, unlike in Phoenix when it's 115 and you have the sun shinning down on you with no shade anywhere.

As far as places to live that fit your parameters, there's plenty within range. My favorite area is around Friendly Shopping Center, which has already been mentioned. If you're looking at a map, anywhere north of W. Market st, from downtown Greensboro all the way out of town, depending how rural you want to be, is generally full of good areas to look at. If you keep going west out of town you'll see Colfax and then Kernersville. There is barely anything in Colfax, but Kernersville is sort of a suburb of Winston and Greensboro with some of its own personality. Another popular area near Greensboro is the Oakridge and Summerfield area; both north and northwest of town. There are a lot of safe and affordable neighborhoods off Flemming Rd and Horse Pen Creek within range of good schools.
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Old 12-27-2015, 12:13 PM
 
Location: The Triad (NC)
28,496 posts, read 62,152,821 times
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It's not just the humidity numbers...
it's the length of the humidity season that really hurts.

You'll have the AC on nearly every day you don't have the heat on.
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Old 12-27-2015, 01:48 PM
 
6,611 posts, read 6,926,424 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by carolinadawg2 View Post
Greensboro isn't in western, nor eastern NC. Greensboro is very humid in the summer. The OP needs to experience it firsthand in order to determine if its acceptable to her.
Greensboro and the entire Triad is considered part of the western half of NC...it's certainly not western NC, but if you divide the state in two parts it is the western side of the state. The dividing line is usually considered between Alamance and Durham counties. I'm thinking that's what arstal meant.

The humidity around the Triad isn't nearly as bad as the eastern half of the state. Being near the mountains and the VA line, the elevation in Greensboro and Winston-Salem is fairly high...more than twice that of Raleigh and Durham and 10 times the elevation of Orlando. Elevation helps keep the humidity down just a bit.
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Old 12-27-2015, 02:33 PM
 
Location: Southport
4,639 posts, read 4,810,855 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JoeTarheel View Post
Greensboro and the entire Triad is considered part of the western half of NC...it's certainly not western NC, but if you divide the state in two parts it is the western side of the state. The dividing line is usually considered between Alamance and Durham counties. I'm thinking that's what arstal meant.

The humidity around the Triad isn't nearly as bad as the eastern half of the state. Being near the mountains and the VA line, the elevation in Greensboro and Winston-Salem is fairly high...more than twice that of Raleigh and Durham and 10 times the elevation of Orlando. Elevation helps keep the humidity down just a bit.
Except that no one with any knowledge of NC would divide the state into 2 sections, geographically.
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