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Old 04-22-2016, 10:20 AM
 
Location: West Raleigh
1,037 posts, read 1,210,641 times
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In Raleigh, where I live, we have similar ordinances.

As a previous poster mentioned, the impetus is partially about the appearance.

However, it's also an environmental issue especially when there are multiple cars parking in the same yard. The non-impervious surface of the lawn allows any fluids that come out of the car to get into the ground and thus contaminate the ground water. Conversely, if you park on a driveway or other impervious surface, the fluids are funneled more to the storm water system.
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Old 04-22-2016, 11:12 AM
 
Location: Chapelboro
11,900 posts, read 13,058,687 times
Reputation: 9859
Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky Dawg View Post
You'd be ok living next door to this?
YES!

If you wouldn't be, you can go live in a HOA neighborhood.

I would have absolutely no problem with it. I live in a nice older neighborhood in Chapel Hill with an average home value of about $300k judging by what recent home sales have gone for. We don't care. My neighbor across the street usually has a couple of cars parked on the street. The family next to them have 2 or 3 on the street, one of which is a landscaping truck and trailer.

The impervious argument is not really valid. Many driveways in my neighborhood are gravel and completely permeable.

My neighborhood is highly sought after and homes go fast. We do not have an HOA and do not want one. We like our neighborhood unhomogenized and folks can do what they want including paint their mailboxes different colors and park their vehicles, boats, whatever on their own property in their own yard.
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Old 04-22-2016, 11:21 AM
 
398 posts, read 413,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by poppydog View Post
YES!

If you wouldn't be, you can go live in a HOA neighborhood.

I would have absolutely no problem with it. I live in a nice older neighborhood in Chapel Hill with an average home value of about $300k judging by what recent home sales have gone for. We don't care. My neighbor across the street usually has a couple of cars parked on the street. The family next to them have 2 or 3 on the street, one of which is a landscaping truck and trailer.

The impervious argument is not really valid. Many driveways in my neighborhood are gravel and completely permeable.

My neighborhood is highly sought after and homes go fast. We do not have an HOA and do not want one. We like our neighborhood unhomogenized and folks can do what they want including paint their mailboxes different colors and park their vehicles, boats, whatever on their own property in their own yard.
Actually, they can't. Chapel Hill also has an ordinance prohibiting parking in the front yard. Virtually every city does. And I haven't said anything about on street parking, mail box colors, etc. Please don't paint me in the pro-HOA corner, as I'm not.
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Old 04-22-2016, 11:22 AM
 
398 posts, read 413,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skinsguy37 View Post
No I would not. It's their property, it's their business. So as long as they're not infringing on my rights or being disruptive, they can do what they want. Would I like for them to take more pride in their property? Of course I would. I grew up in a rural area where anything goes. Yet, almost always, even people in these rural areas took pride in their property and didn't need any ordinance to tell them what to do.
Lowering your property value IS infringing on your rights.
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Old 04-22-2016, 01:41 PM
 
Location: Greensboro, NC
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky Dawg View Post
Lowering your property value IS infringing on your rights.
Not really. Considering how many things can lower your property value, if you spent all of your time fighting each and every thing that would cause some decline in the value of your property, you'd be one miserable dawg. There might be a house just up the street that is in need of some cosmetic repair and paint. That's enough to cause the property value of the rest of the homes to decline. Are you going to threaten your neighbor to fix his house or risk having the law called on them? I'm sure that would go over quite well! Or, you could offer to help him fix things up if he's in a bad spot - for the good of the neighborhood. Who knows, maybe the offer is repaid down the road.
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Old 04-22-2016, 01:43 PM
 
Location: Greensboro, NC
5,914 posts, read 4,957,457 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by StAndroid View Post
In Raleigh, where I live, we have similar ordinances.

As a previous poster mentioned, the impetus is partially about the appearance.

However, it's also an environmental issue especially when there are multiple cars parking in the same yard. The non-impervious surface of the lawn allows any fluids that come out of the car to get into the ground and thus contaminate the ground water. Conversely, if you park on a driveway or other impervious surface, the fluids are funneled more to the storm water system.
There are plenty of neighborhoods where there are no paid driveways and no issues with drinking water.
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Old 04-22-2016, 01:56 PM
 
398 posts, read 413,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skinsguy37 View Post
Not really. Considering how many things can lower your property value, if you spent all of your time fighting each and every thing that would cause some decline in the value of your property, you'd be one miserable dawg. There might be a house just up the street that is in need of some cosmetic repair and paint. That's enough to cause the property value of the rest of the homes to decline. Are you going to threaten your neighbor to fix his house or risk having the law called on them? I'm sure that would go over quite well! Or, you could offer to help him fix things up if he's in a bad spot - for the good of the neighborhood. Who knows, maybe the offer is repaid down the road.
Yes, really. Its not a debatable fact that having a neighboring property lower one's property value is an infringement on one's rights.

And its not a matter of of a house needed some fix up or "calling the law", its about being a good neighbor, respecting other people's rights, etc. Personally, I'm very glad things like zoning laws, minimum housing codes, no parking in front yard ordinances, maximum grass height ordinances, etc. exist. The reality is, some people just don't care about their impact on others and sometimes (very rarely) they have to forced to do whats right.

I wouldn't want to live next door to a slaughterhouse on one side of me, and a junkyard with 4 foot tall weeds growing up around the cars on the other side. I'm glad we have laws and ordinances to prevent that. Anarchy isn't really that much fun, once you get past 12 years old.
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Old 04-22-2016, 02:48 PM
 
Location: Greensboro, NC
5,914 posts, read 4,957,457 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky Dawg View Post
Yes, really. Its not a debatable fact that having a neighboring property lower one's property value is an infringement on one's rights.
Oh geez, then freakin' move then if it's going to get your panties in a wad. The rest of us have had zero issues with this living in ordinance free, HOA free neighborhoods.

And its not a matter of of a house needed some fix up or "calling the law", its about being a good neighbor, respecting other people's rights, etc. Personally, I'm very glad things like zoning laws, minimum housing codes, no parking in front yard ordinances, maximum grass height ordinances, etc. exist. The reality is, some people just don't care about their impact on others and sometimes (very rarely) they have to forced to do whats right.[/quote]

Maybe you need to apply this to yourself?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Lucky Dawg View Post
I wouldn't want to live next door to a slaughterhouse on one side of me, and a junkyard with 4 foot tall weeds growing up around the cars on the other side. I'm glad we have laws and ordinances to prevent that. Anarchy isn't really that much fun, once you get past 12 years old.
We're talking about a freakin' parking in the grass ordinance. How did you get to junkyards and slaughterhouses? And please, stop with condescending remarks. You're about as fun to deal with as a root canal.
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Old 04-22-2016, 02:59 PM
 
398 posts, read 413,569 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by skinsguy37 View Post
Oh geez, then freakin' move then if it's going to get your panties in a wad. The rest of us have had zero issues with this living in ordinance free, HOA free neighborhoods.
What? How are my "panties in a wad"? I have no idea what you're referring to. And no one lives in an ordinance free neighborhood. We're discussing city ordinances...they apply uniformly to the entire city.

Quote:
Originally Posted by skinsguy37 View Post
And its not a matter of of a house needed some fix up or "calling the law", its about being a good neighbor, respecting other people's rights, etc. Personally, I'm very glad things like zoning laws, minimum housing codes, no parking in front yard ordinances, maximum grass height ordinances, etc. exist. The reality is, some people just don't care about their impact on others and sometimes (very rarely) they have to forced to do whats right.
Maybe you need to apply this to yourself? [/quote]

Excuse me? Again, I have no idea what you're referring to.

Quote:
Originally Posted by skinsguy37 View Post
We're talking about a freakin' parking in the grass ordinance. How did you get to junkyards and slaughterhouses?
Yes, its an ordinance restricting how one can make use of one's property...a concept you, and others, have commented on as not being something you're supportive of. Just like zoning laws are ordinances that restrict one's use of one's own property. Same concept. I think some restrictions are proper and good. No one has an absolute right to do anything one wants with their property, just as no one has absolute freedom of speech.
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Old 04-23-2016, 01:03 AM
 
5,048 posts, read 7,999,736 times
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Yeah, that's what I meant by areas I'm familiar with. I can see this kind of thing progressing.

Wasn't referring to the little strip between the curb and sidewalk. I guess a vehicle could partially climb the curb...hadn't even thought of that one. No, referring to areas where there is no curb and the grass in some areas we've lived in between the road and where the HOA takes charge. Have had vehicles there.

So the front yard parking is up by the house.

The ordinance is not everywhere but I can understand it working its way around the country.

We looked at houses in Greensboro a couple of years ago. Nice area.
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