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Old 08-05-2006, 11:48 PM
 
Location: State of Bliss :-)
463 posts, read 1,518,664 times
Reputation: 164

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Quote:
Originally Posted by Miker2069
Cassie can you please say more about the having to wait 6 months to attend a community college. Are you referring to the tuition rate per credit for residence vs. non-residence?
Hi,
I may have confused you with the part about waiting 6 more months. I've been here for 6 months so if I wanted to attend even a Community College, I'd have to wait another 6 months before I'm eligible for in state tuition. I could attend now, but I'd have to pay out of state tuition. You have to be a resident of the state for a year before you are eligible for in-state tuition. That doesn't apply to some continuing Ed, Adult Ed or similar classes, but it does for curriculum classes--including blacksmithing. Not that I want to be a blacksmith, I just thought that was odd. There's no degree available for it, and I don't think it's even a full semester class, but it's considered a curriculum class. Go figure

Last edited by Cassie; 08-06-2006 at 12:24 AM..
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Old 08-06-2006, 07:21 AM
 
23 posts, read 56,222 times
Reputation: 13
The minute you step away from corporate and begin to taste the local flavors that this area has to offer, I believe you'll begin to understand why people move away from the big cities and look for something better. If you're moving to a new place that dosent have what you had where you already were-why move there? A simple question that seems to have an overwhelmingly hard answer. Now I know how the Native Americans felt.
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Old 08-06-2006, 09:41 AM
 
Location: Greensboro
34 posts, read 101,871 times
Reputation: 22
Greensboro sushi

There are quite a few venues. Sushi 101 is probably the best. Small, intimate sushi bar. Best to go at off hours, they don't do well with crowds. Near UNCG campus. Ed Cone--nationally famous(!) Gso blogger, it's his fav lunch spot.

Sushi bar at Kabuto chain on Wendover Ave is good too.

Wasabi sushi restaurant on Market is decent, too, but they also struggle when it's crowded. A Southern thing.

I wouldn't NOT move here because you're afraid you won't find sushi.

There's lots of other foods you won't find readily, affordably available. My food rants/raves blog about eating in the Triad and etc: eatingupgreensboro.blogspot.com
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Old 08-06-2006, 09:49 AM
 
2,301 posts, read 1,899,817 times
Reputation: 317
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cassie
Hi,
I may have confused you with the part about waiting 6 more months. I've been here for 6 months so if I wanted to attend even a Community College, I'd have to wait another 6 months before I'm eligible for in state tuition. I could attend now, but I'd have to pay out of state tuition. You have to be a resident of the state for a year before you are eligible for in-state tuition. That doesn't apply to some continuing Ed, Adult Ed or similar classes, but it does for curriculum classes--including blacksmithing. Not that I want to be a blacksmith, I just thought that was odd. There's no degree available for it, and I don't think it's even a full semester class, but it's considered a curriculum class. Go figure

Yeah and It's a huge difference if you wait. I told my kids they have to wait
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Old 08-06-2006, 11:31 AM
 
Location: MI
333 posts, read 1,097,098 times
Reputation: 168
Quote:
Originally Posted by Cassie
Gosh having a bad evening?? lol

===

No, I simply have a different idea of "progress" than you.
====
You wrote:
==========

Well all those new Fidelity jobs heading down to NC are paying on average $54K I believe. Don't feel that is minimum wage. I
==========

Re: jobs like Fidelity. I've seen the state give plenty of financial incentives to bring big companies in, and watched the companies, in turn, bring in a bunch of their own people rather than hiring the locals. But who knows, maybe one of those big companies will make an exception for you if/when you decide to move here.

Many of us aren't in finance nor are we pharmacists. I have a college degree, and don't care to go back to school, and in NC I'd have to have a year of residence ( which means 6 more months) to attend even a Community College, unless I want to pay out of state tuition, which I don't.
======
You wrote:

Again, there are good, medium, and "not so well" paying jobs with the progress. I see yuo are the half empty type of gal that's ok. I will spread my naive sunshine then hah.
====

No, I'm a realist who is *from* NC, moved to NoVA - ( ooh and you should see what "progress" did to our beautiful county there) and then moved back to NC. I'm not getting my information from online articles. I live here No hard feelings. I just get a lil bothered when people who have never lived here and possibly never will encourage others to make the move based on online articles. That's all you have to go on. You've never lived here. For some of us the reality is different especially when it comes to job opportunities and pay.
On my first response I don't recall encouraging her to "move", I was responding to her worry about Starbucks, of which I said built it - people, jobs, homes (which you cannot argue against me are NOT coming to major areas of NC) then Starbucks will come. Major corporate national chains go where the business is, like it or not. I am not here saying this is good, bad, or indifferent, but the fact. You seem to think that since I say these things are happening or will happen (i.e. this form of "progress") that by pointing out this, that I find it to be a "great" thing. In fact I could care less about Starbucks and don't go there. Although I see why other people do and I think for some people its a great place so more power to them. If a place doesnt work or has a bad business model or is not "wanted" by a large group of the local population than that place will fail. Obviously by the simple fact that there is a thread asking about its availability Starbucks is doing the right thing for a "subset" of the US population (not everyone)

Anyhow just take it easy, I am not encouraging everyone to go to NC, when they ask questions about things I try to give answers so they dont have to do the same research I spent a lot of time doing. Also being a resident doesnt make one an expert on everything. There are things about MI I have no knowledge of, that someone from Florida might (whether it be a chain or stores, a job type that is available in both states that I don't know a thing about etc)

And yes things can get overdone as it was in NoVa, and I am sure it will eventually happen to Raleigh. Thats the reality of Americans - we overdo things, and take good things and overdo them. So one has to deal with the good and the bad. No place is perfect, nor do I remember saying NC was. But to say just because this company is coming or that company is coming, than the job creation is not there, and that they usually bring their own workers anyhow or that all the jobs created are low paying is a large generalization and obviously false so 'reality' or not, its false reality. You sound bitter about your own situation perhaps, and therefore the words coming through make it sound like you are upset about other peope potentially finding high paying, and a good standard of life in NC. If everything is based on 1 or 2 online articles, yes one could be jumping the gun, but there are 100s of articles out there stating the "positives" of NC in terms of job creation, relative cost of living etc so I cannot believe they are all lies and baseless claims, and yes no one is naive enough to believe with these good things do not come bad things. Or maybe opportunity is not there for everyone. It's all relative to me. In India you are born in a caste, and you can never change - therefore if you are born in the lowest caste you are destined no matter what to do nothing better than clean sewers, even if you PhD intelligence, work ethic beyond the best, etc. Americans on the other hand, tend to complain and be all about self woe in many ways. At least here, if things suck you can find another job, work 2 jobs, change fields completely, move to a another place in the country where costs are even lower, among 100s of other options instead of complaining.
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Old 08-06-2006, 11:49 AM
 
Location: Wake Forest NC
1,611 posts, read 4,404,853 times
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Apparently Starbucks pays well & has great medical benefits. The NY Times had an article last summer about laid off executives working there for the benefits!

Anyway, I love their coffee but at $4 a pop it is a treat, not a habit. In NY I had lots of Dunkin Donuts coffee- it is smoother, better for every day drinking, & cheaper. Almost all of our independent coffee places were pushed out by the chains.
I have been making coffee at home this week since I am no longer going out to work it seems silly to get in the car & go out when I am no longer going to be stuck in the car for an hour commuting!
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Old 08-06-2006, 11:50 AM
 
Location: MI
333 posts, read 1,097,098 times
Reputation: 168
Default Major metro areas that Starbucks resides in I am sure

Here ya go Cassie, I am listing the largest metro areas in the USA, tell me which one I should move in or sucks worst than Raleigh.
My simple criteria are, I can afford to buy a house in a good neighborhood (say $225K or less), its not hot for 6 months of the year like the US southwest or deep south (3 months of intense heat is about my limit), or bitter cold in the winter like it is here in MI, there are jobs being created in a healthy manner, people generally like the area, and its near to a larger city so there are "things to do" - pretty simple requests eh?

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of..._by_population

1) NYC - cold in winter, house costs not reasonable, intensively crowded, taxes
2) LA - house costs not reasonable, intensely crowded
3) Chicago - lots of great factors but cold winters and housing is starting to get out of hand
4) Philly - colder winters and quite a few negatives on various forums I have read, job creation is slow
5) Dallas - cheap housing, too long and hot of a summer, nothing special in job creation (Houston and Austin seem to be getting more of the jobs)
6) Miami - expensive, too long and hot of a summer
7) Houston - housing still cheap, too long and hot of a summer
8) DC - I liked everything about this area but the housing costs and traffic
9) Atlanta - everything is positive but warmer/longer summers, and traffic nightmare, also from what I "read" (no I don't live there) crime is worse than average.
10) Detroit - no jobs, bad winters
11) Boston - love the city but its too expensive, still has some winter
12) San Fran - can't afford anything there
13) Riverside CA - same problems as LA
14) Phoenix - forget it, summers in the 110s+
15) Seattle - this one has a lot of positives, cooler temps than NC though
16) Minneapolisi - a lot of great attributes, but that winter
17) San Diego - perfect weather, too expensive
18) St Louis - nothing great happening here in terms of jobs, summers are quite brutal and still gets quite cold in winter
19) Baltimore - same problems as DC but with more crime
20) Tampa - weather in FL, more of old folks area anyhow, housing increasing, been there and its one big blob of suburbia, at least it has the ocean though, but that brings up hurrican issues
21) Pittsburgh - all same issues as Detroit
22) Denver - this is a nice area, winter not as good as NC
23) Cleveland - a rebounding area, but winter weather not so great
24) Portland - a lot to like, public transport, a very green city, weather similar to Seattle, decent jobs, etc
25) Cincy - been there, nothing special, no great job creation, winters still get cold

Looking through #26 - #50 the only one that fits most of those criteria and is up and coming is Nashville

So those are the top 25 metros - Charlotte is # 37, Raleigh/Cary - # 51

They all have issues as does NC cities. Many have a lot worse job creation, lot worse weather (if you like relatively temperate climes most of the year), lot worse traffic issues, lot worse cost of living in terms of housing, lot worst crime, etc

So I'd put Portland, Seattle, Denver and Raleigh (maybe Nasheville) together in as araes with a lot of positives for "my criteria" - you can poke holes in all of them, none are perfect but for what I (and apparently many people seek) there are a lot of positives in the area. There is no nirvana and if there were it would get overpopulation and turn away from a nirvana within a decade anyhow. Without going and living in each one for 3-5 years I don't know how you expect anyone to narrow it down or begin to judge areas appropriate for themselves other than "reading" and "researching"?

Looking forward to your response

Last edited by thisguy; 08-06-2006 at 12:09 PM..
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Old 08-07-2006, 12:38 AM
 
480 posts, read 2,114,769 times
Reputation: 375
Quote:
Originally Posted by thisguy
So I'd put Portland, Seattle, Denver and Raleigh (maybe Nasheville) together in as araes with a lot of positives for "my criteria" - you can poke holes in all of them, none are perfect but for what I (and apparently many people seek) there are a lot of positives in the area. There is no nirvana and if there were it would get overpopulation and turn away from a nirvana within a decade anyhow. Without going and living in each one for 3-5 years I don't know how you expect anyone to narrow it down or begin to judge areas appropriate for themselves other than "reading" and "researching"?
And whaddaya know, I've lived in or visited all four places. I live in Seattle now, visit Portland and Denver often, and grew up in Raleigh.

I guess I'll break this down by four markers: crime, housing market, job market, and "intangibles".

CRIME

1) Seattle
2) Raleigh
3) Denver
4) Portland

Seattle is much larger than Raleigh but boasts a lower "personal" crime (i.e., rape, murder, aggravated assault, etc.) rate than Raleigh. Seattle has much more property crime, particularly vehicle thefts. Denver and Portland both have pretty high personal crime rates. Though Portland is probably the smallest city on this short list, it's definitely the place where you least want to be walking around after dark.

HOUSING MARKET

1) Raleigh
2) Denver
3) Portland
4) Seattle

Raleigh is the big winner here, both in relative inexpensiveness of the housing there and the probability of the housing to go up in value. While there will definitely be no California-esque appreciation, there is definitely something to be said for the real estate there.

Denver is also a very inexpensive place to live, as far as housing is concerned.

Portland is much more expensive than Denver and Raleigh. In Seattle, you can't even begin to look for housing unless you are willing to spend over $400k.

JOB MARKET

1) Seattle
2) Raleigh
3) Denver
4) Portland

Portland is a notoriously BAD place to go without employment.

Seattle is a port city that is also bolstered by many industries, from IT to retail to insurance and beyond. It is a very good place to find a job right now.

Raleigh also has a lot of jobs, but as a right-to-work state, there are also less protections for workers. Also, there are more low-income jobs than living-wage jobs in the area right now, though that may change.

INTANGIBLES

I won't rate these since they are all very subjective ramblings.

Denver is beautiful. However, the winters are BRUTAL. The airport looks like a line of teepees. The wind will cut right through you, but the people are nice. It seems like a nice "hidden" place to live right now, as it is sort of under-the-radar of the major "best places to live" lists. That could be a good thing.

Portland is a leftist paradise, but it is quickly outgrowing its banks with California refugees who see the place as cheaper than it actually is. This city has much less of a solid job base than Seattle, but what it lacks in employment it makes up in pure charm. This is both a gritty and attractive little city that is a haven for those who share its plucky and independent spirit.

Seattle is probably one of the most beautiful places on Earth. It is also, sadly, super-expensive. The culture in Seattle is super-relaxed and so easy-going that it flies in the face of the more rigid cultures on the East Coast, so East Coasters will probably be in for a shock to move to a city where suits are discouraged and jeans are worn to the opera.

Raleigh is in a state of flux right now. It has always been a place to raise kids (for better or for worse) and is now trying to build an identity for those who seek more nightlife. That will take some time. Shopping is the main sport in Raleigh, and there are many chain stores to fit the need. However, this city needs to get back to its roots and figure out what its identity really is. It's torn between the potential shown in its relatively high national rankings as a great place to live, and the reality of lagging infrastructure to fit those lofty goals. Raleigh is less conservative than many other places in the South, but more conservative than the places on the West Coast.

If you need more information, by all means, let me know.
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Old 08-08-2006, 08:17 AM
 
23 posts, read 56,222 times
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A lot of people equate corporate with growth. More corporations = more growth. Please keep in mind that America was born and raised on "MOM & POP" businesses, and from day one the country grew just fine. The original value of "business cultivation" has been lost to "mass marketing". The major corps have taken our "Main Street's U.S.A.", and turned them into ghost towns.
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Old 08-27-2006, 12:08 PM
 
2,560 posts, read 6,076,087 times
Reputation: 1062
Anyone try "The Smelly Cat" coffee house in the NoDa district? Looks like they have bagels, coffe drinks, ice cream, milk shakes, candy, baked goods etc. Love their logo!
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