U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Greensboro, Winston-Salem, High Point
 [Register]
Greensboro, Winston-Salem, High Point The Triad Area
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 12-07-2009, 12:35 PM
 
4 posts, read 8,795 times
Reputation: 10

Advertisements

I am going to be a transfer student wanting to get a teaching degree in Middle Grade Education. I have done a lot of research on salaries, benefits, and more. I have found nothing good about anything. What I am wanting to know is does anyone have anything good to say about becoming a teacher? I understand becoming a teacher isn't about the money but I would really like to stay in NC and teach. I'm wondering if by getting my teaching degree I am going to be nothing but frustrated for the rest of my life or is there is a silver lining and most people on the internet are just venting the issues they have had?
I would love to hear any encouraging stories or benefits of becoming a teacher besides the usual I love my job or you get a summer vacation. I am getting very discouraged by all the negativity.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 12-07-2009, 01:40 PM
 
2,648 posts, read 6,085,655 times
Reputation: 3409
Hi Tara,
My wife teaches special ed in middle school, and she loves her job. It takes a special person though--there are many teachers who don't love what they do, and it makes you wonder why they stay in the profession. You are correct that the rewards aren't monetary. For my wife, the rewards are in reaching out to kids, connecting with them, giving them respect and love that they often don't get at home, and the knowledge that you can change their lives by showing them the value of learning. That's it. If you're looking for anything else out of teaching, you probably won't find it. But if you appreciate those things, it's the most wonderful job you can have.

Yes, the schedule is nice--you get up early, but you get home early in the afternoon, and you get the holiday breaks and summers off. But it's also difficult to get days off during the teaching year, so your vacations are limited to the times you aren't in school. But overall it's a good schedule.

I hope you strongly consider teaching. There aren't enough good teachers, and if you have the gift and the love for it, you will find your rewards every day in the eager faces of the kids who look up to you. Good luck!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-07-2009, 01:53 PM
 
4 posts, read 8,795 times
Reputation: 10
Thank you arbyunc, I know I shouldn't look to other people for advice on if I should be a teacher but it is hard to find out the truth and particulars of the profession. I have been searching for more information on the type of benefits that they receive and how their retirement works, etc. Also just trying to figure out what teaching is really like in NC as you never truly know until you do it or talk to someone who has. I appreciate the reminder of what teaching is really about. I look forward to starting school and even though it is years away teaching too!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-08-2009, 08:37 PM
 
53 posts, read 250,324 times
Reputation: 50
You are better off moving to a state with a union if you do not need to stay in NC; however, if you love NC, just accept that as a teacher here you will have more difficulties than those in states with strong unions.
I loved teaching in my previous state with a union. Here, it is a right to work state and the lack of a union seems to have many teachers feeling as though they are powerless; therefore, they continue to go along with the status quo while quietly venting their frustration. Hence, seeing a lot of negative comments on blogs. Members of my family who teach in other states have more positive comments than those I hear working here. I enjoy living in NC, so I teach here. But I did enjoy teaching in my previous state more; however, I did not enjoy raising my family there. There are pros and cons to all things in life. It is up to your personal circumstances to decide what works best for you. Student teaching gives you a good taste for what teaching is like; however, there are many more frustrations that come with being a full-time teacher, especially one in a state where you have very little power.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2009, 10:57 AM
 
676 posts, read 2,802,355 times
Reputation: 771
Quote:
Originally Posted by jasonthebaker View Post
You are better off moving to a state with a union if you do not need to stay in NC; however, if you love NC, just accept that as a teacher here you will have more difficulties than those in states with strong unions.
I loved teaching in my previous state with a union. Here, it is a right to work state and the lack of a union seems to have many teachers feeling as though they are powerless; therefore, they continue to go along with the status quo while quietly venting their frustration. Hence, seeing a lot of negative comments on blogs. Members of my family who teach in other states have more positive comments than those I hear working here. I enjoy living in NC, so I teach here. But I did enjoy teaching in my previous state more; however, I did not enjoy raising my family there. There are pros and cons to all things in life. It is up to your personal circumstances to decide what works best for you. Student teaching gives you a good taste for what teaching is like; however, there are many more frustrations that come with being a full-time teacher, especially one in a state where you have very little power.
I agree with the lack of a strong union being a big problem and the horrible health benefits. If you are single person it isn't as bad, but trying to raise a family on a teacher's salary with their health benefits is very difficult. I hate to be rude, but it really will be the same song and dance for the positives and negatives no matter where you are in the teaching field. It is a rewarding profession with little monetary gains. If you love children and feel like you can make a positive impact on their life, it is the job for you. If you majored in history and have no idea what to do with your degree, so you get into teaching for the sake of having a job you will most likely be miserable. There is a lot of politics, but if you have a strong knowledge of your subject, excellent classroom management skills and the ability to relate to your students without being their "friends" you will be great! To be honest, many people start off teaching and after 3 years leave the profession. You have nothing to lose, but to try and see if it is a good fit for you. My husband has flourished in his career, but we are struggling to raise our family in NC. He loves being in the classroom and actually never complains about anything. I am the one doing all the complaining about teaching and know very well I would never survive a year doing it!!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2009, 11:11 AM
 
4 posts, read 8,795 times
Reputation: 10
Thanks everyone, I was wanting to know if anyone could shed some light on retirement for teachers? Pensions? 401k? 403(b)? I know the state of NC mandates you save a portion of your income toward retirement...8% I believe is what I saw but how does it work come retirement time? Does the state only give you back what you put in and when that runs out your out or do they give you so much each month per year of service like some unions negotiate? That is one of the things that I have had a hard time finding more information on. Any enlightenment will help.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2009, 05:30 PM
 
Location: Winston-Salem
273 posts, read 850,553 times
Reputation: 188
As far as retirement, right now it is a pension style arrangement. Here's a link
Estimator - North Carolina Department of the State Treasurer (http://www.nctreasurer.com/DSTHome/RetirementSystems/Estimator.htm - broken link) but I think it is based off the last 6 years highest salary.

You can also pay into a 401k account, but no matching since there is a pension.

Health insurance for the employee is paid, but for additional dependents/spouses you cover the actual cost.

Google is a great asset to find specific items.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-09-2009, 09:02 PM
 
Location: On the brink of WWIII
21,093 posts, read 23,903,558 times
Reputation: 7812
Moved to NC almost a year ago to teach. Taught 15+ years in a cold northern state and so far I absolutely love it here. And the teaching job is pretty good as well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-10-2009, 06:07 AM
 
2,648 posts, read 6,085,655 times
Reputation: 3409
The nice thing about retirement, at least right now, is that you can retire after 30 years' service. Not bad. In addition, you can "double-dip" by taking a teaching job after retirement. I think you have to wait either 6 months or a year, but after that you can take another teaching job, although your retirement benefit will be reduced some. Still, it's a great deal if you want to continue teaching a few more years.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 12-14-2009, 09:17 PM
 
53 posts, read 250,324 times
Reputation: 50
Quote:
Originally Posted by arbyunc View Post
The nice thing about retirement, at least right now, is that you can retire after 30 years' service. Not bad. In addition, you can "double-dip" by taking a teaching job after retirement. I think you have to wait either 6 months or a year, but after that you can take another teaching job, although your retirement benefit will be reduced some. Still, it's a great deal if you want to continue teaching a few more years.
I had it really good in AZ. Full retirement after 20 years of service. 30 was a big shock to me when we moved here. If retirement is important, do some comparisons. I kept more of my paycheck in AZ, could have retired 10 years earlier, and still had time for another job before actual retirement. 30 years is a longtime in a classroom; I'm close to 10 and it starts to wear on you after awhile with all of the changes that have happened since I first began teaching. It will be hard to keep up with technology if it keeps advancing at the current rate. My teaching practices will be so different in 20 years with all of the changes yet to come. Hopefully, I'll be able to keep up.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2016 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > North Carolina > Greensboro, Winston-Salem, High Point
Similar Threads
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. · Please obey Forum Rules · Terms of Use and Privacy Policy · Bug Bounty

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top