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Old 10-18-2012, 10:50 AM
 
Location: Islip,NY
16,934 posts, read 19,672,707 times
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My grandmother had big a necklace made from aurora borealis crystals. My mom's friend who makes costume jewelryn was able to make me a bracelet and earrinf to wear on my wedding day from them as well as 2 more bracelets, one for my mom and one for my Aunt. kind of looked something like this except longer and more beads.
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Old 10-18-2012, 10:53 AM
 
Location: California / Maryland / Cape May
1,548 posts, read 2,422,772 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by lubby View Post
My grandmother had big a necklace made from aurora borealis crystals. My mom's friend who makes costume jewelryn was able to make me a bracelet and earrinf to wear on my wedding day from them as well as 2 more bracelets, one for my mom and one for my Aunt. kind of looked something like this except longer and more beads.
That's a creative idea.
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Old 10-19-2012, 05:18 AM
 
Location: Seattle some of the time now.
726 posts, read 488,151 times
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Thanks Sunny~ You're right. When I try to get rid of my son's things, it means a type of ending to his life I just don't want to admit. It feels like his life didn't count. Even my ex says to just blindly throw all our son's papers away. But our son has a son & maybe he'll want to read what his father wrote? As a way of getting to know him better? He was only nine when his Dad/my son passed away. Part of the problem is some things are in my new home, some are in my home I just moved from & am trying to clean out and some is at my ex's office (which my ex hasn't tossed out).

I'm so sorry you lost the 'closest' person to you. :'( I feel so sad for your pain. It just sucks, doesn't it? My heart and prayers are with you... and all those on these posts who have been touched by the death of loved ones. Thanks for the kindness!
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Old 10-19-2012, 06:43 AM
 
Location: California / Maryland / Cape May
1,548 posts, read 2,422,772 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by NoNansea View Post
Thanks Sunny~ You're right. When I try to get rid of my son's things, it means a type of ending to his life I just don't want to admit. It feels like his life didn't count. Even my ex says to just blindly throw all our son's papers away. But our son has a son & maybe he'll want to read what his father wrote? As a way of getting to know him better? He was only nine when his Dad/my son passed away. Part of the problem is some things are in my new home, some are in my home I just moved from & am trying to clean out and some is at my ex's office (which my ex hasn't tossed out).

I'm so sorry you lost the 'closest' person to you. :'( I feel so sad for your pain. It just sucks, doesn't it? My heart and prayers are with you... and all those on these posts who have been touched by the death of loved ones. Thanks for the kindness!
And your son has a son? What a terrible situation all around. I can't even begin to imagine what that must be like for your family. I'm so very sorry.

In that case, I would absolutely keep your son's things, or at least what you find to be most important. As the child (your grandchild), when the time is right, I know I'd want my parents things (or at least the opportunity to decide which of his things) I want to keep. Coming from someone that keeps relatively nothing (with the exception of a small box of family heirlooms, a small box of family photos, and a small box of my childhood keepsakes to pass down), I think you're doing the right thing. #1, because if you're not yet ready, then you're not ready. #2, if your grandson wants to keep things of your son's that may mean something to him when he's older, that's a very special gift that you'll be able to give him. Only you know what's right for you and your family, and that's all that matters.

Thank you. Ironically, as if the universe is trying to tell me something, I lost the four closest people in my family/life all back to back, but the closest of them was obviously the hardest. I just continue to take it one day at a time, and try to help others when I can. That's all we can ask of ourselves.
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Old 10-19-2012, 04:17 PM
 
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I've been thinking about you all, and how much better I feel reading this discussion. NoNansea, you might like to scan the writings and take some pictures you have of your son and some of his favorite things, and make it into a hard cover book like the ones you can make at Shutterfly. You can add text to the images and make a real book out of it, include your fondest and funniest memories. Don't get rid of anything until the shock wears off, which might be next week or five years from now.

My best to you all.

Carolyn
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Old 10-20-2012, 01:35 AM
 
Location: 900 miles from my home in 80814
4,669 posts, read 6,739,165 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by demicent View Post
Don't get rid of anything until the shock wears off, which might be next week or five years from now.

Carolyn
I agree with this. I made some rash decisions when I sold my home by getting rid of some of dh's furniture (his recliner), clothing, books and music he loved, that I can't get back. I think it's wise to err on the side of keeping it all for his son. Let the little boy have the choice later on to decide what he'd like of his fathers.
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Old 10-29-2012, 11:21 AM
 
Location: Old Town Alexandria
14,506 posts, read 23,180,936 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by SunnyTXsmile View Post
I wasn't sure where to put this since it falls into so many categories, but I'm giving it a try here.

What are your thoughts on what to do with inherited items when a loved one passes?

In particular, I inherited, among other things, a fur coat. This perplexes me because, unlike other things I've inherited, I have no need for it since I'll soon be living in CA again, and wouldn't buy it since I haven't even eaten meat in 24 years, but it has sentimental value because it belonged to the most important person in my life and it reminds me of my childhood seeing her wear it. I realize it's only a material thing and won't bring her back, but I'm having a hard time with the idea of parting with it, yet to move it cross country to CA seems a bit crazy, too (especially since I've got everything I own down to one suitcase - to take a second for a coat I'll never wear seems silly for someone as practical as I am).

If you've been in a similar situation with inherited items, how did you handle the situation? Did you have a hard time parting with something or did you decide to keep it just for the memories even though you had no use for it? Though I've had a great deal of loss in my life recently, this particular situation is a first for me. I'm curious to what others decided to do, and if they regret it either way.
Nice thread OP.

I saved alot of my Moms and grandmothers antique furniture. Its mostly stored in 2 car garage which I will have to figure out when/if I move

If it has alot of memories for you , you may want to save it, things like photographs also. Sometimes it takes awhile to go through it all. And I got rid off alot of winter wear, donated it to Goodwill when we were in S Florida.
Bad move, now I need it again.
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Old 07-10-2016, 04:27 PM
 
Location: Islip,NY
16,934 posts, read 19,672,707 times
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My dining room table and bench seat were given to us by the parent's of my husband's friend. Her Aunt died at the age of 90.
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Old 07-10-2016, 05:47 PM
 
4,108 posts, read 3,447,161 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Gerania View Post
I have a difficult time getting rid of inherited items. In the past year I've sold some of them, given things to friends and donated others.

You're right; it's just a thing, an object. Either have a pillow or two made from the coat or donate.

Can't you almost see a beautiful young woman considering it a very lucky day when she finds this beautiful coat in a consignment or thrift shop?

Over the years, I've purchased some lovely things at thrift shops and consignment stores. I really, really like the stuff that I've bought. I've wondered where these things lived before I brought them to my house.

I think that you should put on the coat, have someone take your picture, save the photo and then send it (the coat) on to some lucky recipient. Someone will love it.

This.

I was mortified to hear my grand's simply gorgeous sable coat was turned into bears. Could not flipping believe it.
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