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Old 07-16-2013, 04:44 PM
 
2,598 posts, read 5,235,022 times
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When my ex's Aunt died in 1981, his Uncle hired a professional photographer to come to the funeral home and take pics. He said it was an old Italian tradition in his family. A month or so later he mailed out photos of her to all of her brothers & sisters (large family), it was a little weird seeing those pics.
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Old 07-16-2013, 05:07 PM
 
Location: somewhere in the Kona coffee fields
831 posts, read 856,793 times
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Suggestion: Take a selfie in a coffin when you look at your very best. That can stand next to your coffin when the time comes.
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Old 07-16-2013, 05:15 PM
 
Location: NoVa
18,435 posts, read 27,978,666 times
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I have a feeling it may be more of a southern thing. I am not sure, but I have a feeling.

When my grandmother passed, my ex husband who was then my husband took pictures of her in her coffin. I find it weird because he did not take them of my mom or dad.

Every once in a while I come across pictures and there they are. She looked nothing like herself. She had not lost much weight or looked terrible before she passed, but the person who did hair and make-up did an awful job.

He aslso took pictures of the flowers and the different things people brought to the funeral home....
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Old 07-16-2013, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Hoping to settle down.
20,801 posts, read 17,588,007 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KaraBenNemsi View Post
Suggestion: Take a selfie in a coffin when you look at your very best. That can stand next to your coffin when the time comes.
With a smile and your eyes open!
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Old 07-16-2013, 06:07 PM
 
Location: North Carolina
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Quote:
Originally Posted by tanner View Post
I've seen several post-mortem photos from the Victorian era, mostly of children. While I do find these photos from that era to be eerie, there's also something touching about them. Photos were much rarer at that time in history, and one can see what love the parents had with the efforts they put forth in having these pictures taken. Often the whole family would pose along with the deceased family member. Perhaps they didn't have many, if any, other photos of their loved one.
I'm surprised at the outright revulsion displayed in this thread; it seems to reflect changing attitudes. Having been involved in genealogy as a hobby for many years, I'm finding myself more familiar with the pathos of death.

In earlier generations, considering the high mortality rate for children; women dying in childbirth; the illnesses that today are easily kept away with a simple jab, yet carried off whole families; death was always a near presence to those folks. Today, it seems to come as a shock to some that we all die.

The Victorian Postmortem photos** are hard to look at, but back then they were considered as much a remembrance as modern Walmart studio photographs. Some of the dead, especially in the family portraits, are posed and made up so well that you scratch your head, wondering which is the live person and which is the corpse.

**seriously, don't look at that site if death disturbs you
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Old 07-16-2013, 06:59 PM
 
Location: Columbia, California
6,662 posts, read 24,803,497 times
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Death always brings out the best in people.

My grandmother passed away in 1982, she had boxes and boxes of pictures of family in their coffins. I think the thought goes back to the age of pictures of Lincoln and Billy the Kid in their coffins.
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Old 07-16-2013, 07:25 PM
 
Location: Tampa bay
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I think its rather disgusting but thats just me
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Old 07-16-2013, 07:35 PM
 
Location: State of Being
35,886 posts, read 64,155,288 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Pikantari View Post
I have a feeling it may be more of a southern thing. I am not sure, but I have a feeling.

When my grandmother passed, my ex husband who was then my husband took pictures of her in her coffin. I find it weird because he did not take them of my mom or dad.

Every once in a while I come across pictures and there they are. She looked nothing like herself. She had not lost much weight or looked terrible before she passed, but the person who did hair and make-up did an awful job.

He aslso took pictures of the flowers and the different things people brought to the funeral home....
Well, I am a Southerner and my father is a minister and I am a liturgical organist. So you can bet I have probably been to more funerals than most human beings, lol. And I have NEVER heard of someone taking a photo of a person in their coffin.

It just seems . . . disrespectful on some level.

Now, I can comprehend that someone in another country who couldn't attend the funeral would want a photo . . . even tho I, personally, wouldn't.

So honestly - I do NOT think this is a Southern custom.
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Old 07-16-2013, 08:46 PM
 
Location: The New England part of Ohio
16,994 posts, read 21,009,802 times
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I think it's a Victorian thing. Or it was.

As a child, I was looking though a box of pictures at my grandmother's house. I came across an envelope that was yellowed and brittle. It was sealed.

Curious kid that I was I opened it. It contained very old mostly black and white photographs of babies and very young children, some in the arms of their mother's with their father's standing by, and others lying in basinettes.

The odd thing was the babies and children had blue eyes painted on. The rest of the pictures were black and white.

When I asked my grandmother, she said that they were babies "who had passed" and that their eyes were closed but a photographer painted the eyes to make them look alive.

It had to be one of the eeriest pictures that I've ever seen.
I just found this link -

Post-mortem photography - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

And this one The Strangest Tradition of the Victorian Era: Post-Mortem Photography

Last edited by sheena12; 07-16-2013 at 09:03 PM..
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Old 07-16-2013, 09:54 PM
 
1,006 posts, read 1,726,741 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by CFoulke View Post
I am not familiar with other cultures' beliefs or customs regarding death

Quote:
Originally Posted by CFoulke View Post
- but I do know that it was very tasteless and insensitive for your niece to have done this.

#Judgemuch #Embracediversity #dichotomy
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