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Old 07-18-2013, 01:37 AM
 
Location: 900 miles from my home in 80814
4,670 posts, read 6,745,956 times
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I think what seems macabre to me about the Victorian photos is that they would stand the people up, or sit them on the couch with other family members, and have their eyes open. Maybe because were a century removed from that practice, but I am pretty sure I wouldn't want to be standing up to my dead daughter who was propped up with a rod and head brace and eyes wide open. Being really dumb here, but did they embalm them or anything first? Pretty high on my "Ewwww" meter from a 21st century perspective...
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Old 07-18-2013, 06:26 AM
 
Location: SWFL
21,451 posts, read 18,163,061 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcy1210 View Post
Pretty high on my "Ewwww" meter from a 21st century perspective...
Thanks for putting into better words my "creepy" perspective, Marcy.
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Old 07-18-2013, 08:54 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C.
552 posts, read 932,729 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Marcy1210 View Post
I think what seems macabre to me about the Victorian photos is that they would stand the people up, or sit them on the couch with other family members, and have their eyes open. Maybe because were a century removed from that practice, but I am pretty sure I wouldn't want to be standing up to my dead daughter who was propped up with a rod and head brace and eyes wide open. Being really dumb here, but did they embalm them or anything first? Pretty high on my "Ewwww" meter from a 21st century perspective...
they would have funerals very quickly actually cause they did not have the embalming thing down quite yet. i think in america we have tried to remove ourselves from the death and thats not a typical natural thing we should be doing, especially considering that 2.5 million Americans die a year. thats a lot of exposure to death
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Old 07-18-2013, 06:07 PM
 
Location: Southwest Arkansas
768 posts, read 625,669 times
Reputation: 815
IMO it depends on the condition the person was in

if they were eaten up with cancer- no way!!!
if they died of a heart attack- perhaps
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Old 07-18-2013, 08:53 PM
 
Location: New York, NY
169 posts, read 309,808 times
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My uncle passed away a few years ago & my aunt (his wife) wanted pictures - her standing next to him in the coffin, his brothers & sisters next to the coffin, etc. It was a very non-traditional funeral to begin with as it was held in their living room on their farm in a rural area. The coffin was a plain wooden box - my aunt etched a few scenes into the wooden coffin - the major one being of my uncle riding his Harley. He had been a huge motorcycle fanatic before being bedridden with MS & cancer for something like 20 yrs. My dad attended & sent the pictures to both me & my sister. It was a very different type of funeral, but so "them".
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Old 07-19-2013, 11:18 AM
 
Location: Newport Beach, California
31,500 posts, read 18,461,034 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FKD19124 View Post
My mom passed away back at the end of 2008. At the funeral, we had an open casket. At the end of the service, my neice, who I love but has no common sense, started to take pictures of my Mother laying in her coffin. Talk about tacky!!! has anyone else experienced this??

I have been to funerals where it was video taped and the tape sent to the Ukraine because of family that was elderly and could not make the trip to the states.
This is horrible! I believe that people who have passed away need to be respected, they have right to keep their dignity.

When my ex boyfriend passed away, we did not allow pictures to be taken. I simply don't see the purpose of taking pictures in this situation.

Take care!
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Old 07-19-2013, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Bel Air, California
20,344 posts, read 20,446,632 times
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taking a photograph of the deceased seems a bit invasive, perhaps a better solution would be after viewing the casket to then go sit down in the back row and sketch a quick pencil drawing on a napkin, less obvious and much more personal.
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Old 07-19-2013, 01:57 PM
 
Location: Plymouth Meeting, PA.
3,623 posts, read 1,857,787 times
Reputation: 1707
actually it was common for people to have the viewing at their homes before burial.
Irish wakes were done this way I think.



Quote:
Originally Posted by wisnowbird View Post
My uncle passed away a few years ago & my aunt (his wife) wanted pictures - her standing next to him in the coffin, his brothers & sisters next to the coffin, etc. It was a very non-traditional funeral to begin with as it was held in their living room on their farm in a rural area. The coffin was a plain wooden box - my aunt etched a few scenes into the wooden coffin - the major one being of my uncle riding his Harley. He had been a huge motorcycle fanatic before being bedridden with MS & cancer for something like 20 yrs. My dad attended & sent the pictures to both me & my sister. It was a very different type of funeral, but so "them".
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Old 07-20-2013, 06:23 AM
 
Location: SWFL
21,451 posts, read 18,163,061 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by FKD19124 View Post
actually it was common for people to have the viewing at their homes before burial.
Irish wakes were done this way I think.
My Aunt and Uncle had an Irish wake for my cousin this way back in the '40's when he was killed in WWII. It was a time of mourning AND celebration of Richard's life. My poor Aunt and Uncle, they then received notice that their younger son went MIA over the Pacific. He's never been recovered. He was flying a Red Cross plane and the Japs shot him down.
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Old 07-20-2013, 01:31 PM
 
7,099 posts, read 23,904,184 times
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Why do so many think that death is "Morbid"? It's part of Nature. You live, you die. Maybe some of us need to take a good look at Life, and think about it. Death is coming. It will be a be relief to many, not a morbid, horrible thing.

Taking a picture of a dead person can't be any worse than having a gang in the Delivery Room watching the vagina expand.
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