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Old 02-17-2017, 11:41 AM
Status: "Even better than okay" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
51,225 posts, read 50,499,962 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by G Grasshopper View Post
I have not seen a funeral procession for years - at least 15, maybe more. I have actually been in two, but they were maybe 25-30 years ago. I think that they are so rarely seen, many people have no experience with them and don't know what its all about, let alone how to act. I think they should be respected, but if they become so rare that no one is educated about them, I think you can expect problems. Maybe its different in different parts of the country, and in some areas they are more common.
I don't think they are rarely seen, particularly on roads that have cemeteries on them. Do people not die where you live?
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Old 02-17-2017, 11:46 AM
Status: "Even better than okay" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
51,225 posts, read 50,499,962 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by DewDropInn View Post
I drive by a National Cemetery several times a year. People not only stop for the procession, many get out of their cars and stand silently to pay their respects.
That reminded me of a sight I used to see in Manhattan's Chinatown in the 1990s. I would often walk there at lunchtime, and three or four times I witnessed funeral processions through Chinatown's streets. The hearse would have a poster-sized photo of the deceased on top, bordered with flowers. Shop owners would come out and stand along the sidewalks in respect. Most notable, however, and seeming almost out of place, there would be multiple New Orleans type jazz trios or quartets on various corners playing When The Saints Go Marching In or other hymns as the procession passed by.
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Old 02-17-2017, 10:54 PM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mightyqueen801 View Post
I don't think they are rarely seen, particularly on roads that have cemeteries on them. Do people not die where you live?
I think there has been such a trend toward cremation, many people choose to scatter or take the ashes to someplace that has been requested, and there are fewer burial services. When my husband died, there was a memorial service followed by a reception. But my son and I took his ashes privately, months later, to the place my husband wished. When my mom died, pretty much the same, but my sisters and I actually took the ashes across the country to the town where we grew up and where my grandparents are buried and my mom's one remaining sibling lives. Her ashes were scattered in various places that she enjoyed by the extended family. As I mentioned earlier, one of the processions I was actually in, maybe 20 years ago, was to bury a cremation urn at the cemetery.

In fact, I worked for maybe 5 years in a building that was across the street from a major cemetery, and the only procession I recall that I saw was when a police officer was killed. That was a traditional burial with all the honors. And now that I mention that, there was also a big procession for a slain policeman when I lived in Texas. The freeway was actually closed for that one. So I will amend my statement to say that the only processions I have seen in recent years have been for police officers.

But in general, I think that burial services, which are the only time you would see a funeral procession, are less common because of the rising popularity of cremation.
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Old 02-17-2017, 11:15 PM
 
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The biggest issue is that most processions are not actually following the laws. Example, in Michigan (using it since it was mentioned) the procession has the right of way at intersections including those that are signalized. However the law requires the vehicle in that procession to display an "orange flag" so other vehicles know who is participating. With the advent of daylight running lights, many states had amended their laws to put some additional identification in place so people are not being confused if its a funeral or just newer cars with their headlights on.

Unfortunately, we now live in a time where people no longer understand or respect or care about someone's departure. Motorized funeral processions to a cemetery are seen as old fashion and akin to a horse drawn hearst with wailing mourners walking behind dressed in all black.
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Old 02-19-2017, 08:39 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rabrrita View Post
The biggest issue is that most processions are not actually following the laws. Example, in Michigan (using it since it was mentioned) the procession has the right of way at intersections including those that are signalized. However the law requires the vehicle in that procession to display an "orange flag" so other vehicles know who is participating. With the advent of daylight running lights, many states had amended their laws to put some additional identification in place so people are not being confused if its a funeral or just newer cars with their headlights on.

Unfortunately, we now live in a time where people no longer understand or respect or care about someone's departure. Motorized funeral processions to a cemetery are seen as old fashion and akin to a horse drawn hearst with wailing mourners walking behind dressed in all black.
Hearse, not hearst. But I like what you wrote. Typically funerals in my neck of the woods have 3 or more motorcycle police escorts in a procession. We don't see those as often anymore. Mostly I think because people cannot afford to bury their dearly departed anymore or afford funerals.
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Old 02-20-2017, 09:05 AM
Status: "Even better than okay" (set 9 days ago)
 
Location: Coastal New Jersey
51,225 posts, read 50,499,962 times
Reputation: 60110
Quote:
Originally Posted by G Grasshopper View Post
I think there has been such a trend toward cremation, many people choose to scatter or take the ashes to someplace that has been requested, and there are fewer burial services. When my husband died, there was a memorial service followed by a reception. But my son and I took his ashes privately, months later, to the place my husband wished. When my mom died, pretty much the same, but my sisters and I actually took the ashes across the country to the town where we grew up and where my grandparents are buried and my mom's one remaining sibling lives. Her ashes were scattered in various places that she enjoyed by the extended family. As I mentioned earlier, one of the processions I was actually in, maybe 20 years ago, was to bury a cremation urn at the cemetery.

In fact, I worked for maybe 5 years in a building that was across the street from a major cemetery, and the only procession I recall that I saw was when a police officer was killed. That was a traditional burial with all the honors. And now that I mention that, there was also a big procession for a slain policeman when I lived in Texas. The freeway was actually closed for that one. So I will amend my statement to say that the only processions I have seen in recent years have been for police officers.

But in general, I think that burial services, which are the only time you would see a funeral procession, are less common because of the rising popularity of cremation.
You may be right. My dd has been told that I want to be cremated, and I ended up going to two funerals over the past two weeks--one was the burial, and the other a cremation.

But I still think a lot of older people prefer burial (although the woman in the cremation funeral I attended Friday night was 95, lol.) I am 58, so friend's parents are dying, and most have been burials. Like my parents, they bought plots years ago. My parents bought 6 double plots in 1953. Only my father and a brother are in there so far.
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Old 02-20-2017, 08:49 PM
 
4,840 posts, read 2,145,909 times
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Our area is highly mindful of funeral processions.
Guess we were raised to respect the ceremony of such a passing.
Yup, interrupt it and a ticket will be awarded.
We also pull off to the side for emergency vehicles.fire...Ambulance...Or officers.

When our slain officers or firefighters have their processionals...No one dares to be less then respectful.
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