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Old 05-05-2014, 04:30 AM
 
1,212 posts, read 1,746,120 times
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ok, so I see there are holsters that can be attached within a purse. I was only aware of holsters to be worn on the body.
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Old 05-05-2014, 07:05 AM
 
8,124 posts, read 5,699,713 times
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Revolvers are the easiest hand guns to use, but they don't hold many rounds. Magazine fed handguns are more prone to jam, so maintenance and finding a round that works well in your gun is paramount. Loading a magazine shouldn't be a problem for anyone with the devices that are available that assist with that.
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Old 05-05-2014, 09:01 AM
 
7,282 posts, read 8,385,316 times
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Gun safes. There is something called insurance. Get it. Make sure it covers replacement at new purchase price, not depreciated.

If someone targets you for burglary and they see a gun safe or safe of any kind, one of two things happens, they ignore it because they aren't prepared to deal with it or of they are, the safe disappears, contents and all. They steal entire ATMs from the walls of buildings, the serious thieves aren't deterred by a safe.

The biggest concern is casual access to firearms and the ammunition. Most safes will provide security against that. Unless you have collectibles, fire isn't a big deal. Your house burned down, if you have only a few guns that aren't collectible, probably the least of your concerns, that is what insurance is for. Make sure your insurance provides for new purchase replacement.

When you look for a safe, buy quality, just like when you look for a firearm.
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Old 05-05-2014, 09:02 AM
 
Location: Manayunk
513 posts, read 556,940 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Hedgehog_Mom View Post
If you're keeping a gun for home defense, you have to consider whether or not you could wake up, unlock your safe and get your gun before someone could come in. I know I'm not that fast. That's the same way I feel about keeping the gun locked up in a different place from the ammo. If I need it, I will need it in a hurry.

Of course, it depends on your living situation as well...if you have kids and there's any chance they're going to mess with the gun, then you do need to lock it up. That's not always foolproof either. I had a friend when I was growing up and her dad had a giant safe full of guns. My friend's teenage brother managed to open the safe (the dad always left it locked) and killed his friend in the living room.
The layout of my house is one way up stairs. Then there is three flights of stairs to get up to my bedroom. I am putting in a door that should be able to hold for the time to get the gun out of the safe. I figure, between my dog, steps, door, it would be at least 3 mins, longer if they are trying to "sneak". Since what happened I feel vulnerable, and Everytime I hear the dogs bark in the middle of the night, or growl, or a noise, I am sure the person is trying to get in.

Mentally, I will do anything to protect my child, myself, my home. Legally, I have done everything correct. I have made reports, testified, etc. now I will take NRA classes to make sure I understand how to use it and the mechanics of it.

In PA we have the "castle doctrine".

The most recent version of Pennsylvania’s Castle Doctrine legislation was signed into law in June 2011. The law extends the right to self-defense up to and including deadly force in a victim’s dwelling (now including any attached porch, deck or patio), occupied vehicle, or any other dwelling or vehicle that the victim legally occupies. A place of work is included in the "castle" provision under certain circumstances. Use of deadly force is justifiable if the "castle" area in the event that an assailant is "unlawfully and forcefully entering" or has entered the "castle" area. Deadly force is also justifiable, subject to certain provisions, if a person that legally enters the "castle" goes on to unlawfully attack a victim (when the victim is resonably in fear of his/her life) or if the attacker attempts to kidnap anyone who legally occupies the "castle". The victim must be in "legal possession" of a firearm or other weapon to be justified in the use of that weapon. Use of deadly force to protect an innocent third person is generally allowed in circumstances where the provisions for justifiable self-defense are met. Victims who justifiably use force to defend themselves under the provisions of the law are immune from civil liability for any injuries sustained by the attacker during the incident. The new legislation also contains a stand you ground provision when outside of the "castle". Outside of "castle areas" there is no duty to retreat if confronted with a weapon.


In PA I can also rent guns at the range to try them out. I am buying a membership so I can go and learn and try them all..
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Old 05-05-2014, 09:22 AM
 
Location: Central Texas
13,720 posts, read 24,618,407 times
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I have a revolver (.38) and a Glock 19. My wife has a XDM 45. There is no way she would prefer a revolver, even though it is a bit easier to deal with. I'm not a fanboy of Glock though I like mine. It fits my hand better than the others I tried. Glocks are widespread, easier to service, and lots of accessories to fit them. I think the Glock 26 (9mm subcompact) would be a good purse gun.

I think the rail mounted flashlight is a good idea for a home gun.

In Texas you definitely would want to qualify for a CHL with a semi-auto so you aren't limited to a revolver.
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Old 05-05-2014, 09:48 AM
 
Location: SWUS
5,414 posts, read 7,628,292 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Mr. Lee View Post
For a home defense gun, either a 4 inch .38 spl or a shotgun with OO or OOO Buck in it. As for carry and home defense then a 2 to 3 inch .38 spl would do the job with some practice. A double action only revolver would be best for someone new to handguns, as the biggest issue I have seen with people has been once they pull the hammer back on their revolver, they do not know how to get the hammer down without a chance of an AD.

With any firearm it takes practice and especially the shorter the barrel the more practice it takes to hit what you are aiming at, but with a shotgun it is more point and shoot, yet still requires some practice and someone experienced showing you how to unload and load it without an AD (accidental discharge).

Auto loaders are great guns for experienced persons but it is much harder to make a mistake with a revolver.
Not true.

It's REALLY easy to short stroke a pump action shotgun when faced with losing fine motor function. It happens a lot more than you think.... in addition, 00 or 000 buck is a terrible idea in a house. Not as bad as a slug, but at a social distance within a house you're essentially firing one gigantic slug since the shot doesn't have much chance to spread. More devastating, sure, but much more risk of overpenetration.



Quote:
Originally Posted by d from birmingham View Post
All guns will need maintenance at least once a year and after being fired need to be cleaned. Both are much easier on revolvers then semi autos.

.22 is good for starting out and target practice.

Handguns aren't very accurate and a much larger caliber has nastier recoil so followup shots will miss.

There are a number of nice options in revolvers if you can afford them.
Handguns aren't meant to be used at distances much more than 25yds or so, most CC qualifications I've seen have people do it at 3 and 7 yards (~10 and ~21 feet). Most people can reasonably hit a torso sized target repeatedly within that space, even through 10-18 rounds.

I don'y know where you're getting that revolvers are lower maintenance than a semiauto. Modern semi autos are super easy to clean, can even be left dirty for long periods of time (not a good practice to get into, but still) and don't typically have spaces where lint and stuff can get into; they also don't usually require much maintenance if at all. If you learn the proper technique, handling and manipulating a semi is just as fast, and you have the added benefit of being able to clear your own jams (which are usually a magazine not being seated fully or something catching on the feed ramp).

You can't do that with a revolver, if the revolver breaks you need to send it in to a gunsmith, and jams can lock the entire gun up. I had some friends mistake super hot loaded .357 target rounds for practice rounds and they managed to lock up a modern revolver, a Ruger SP101. Couldn't be fixed within a minute or so like a semi.

Lastly, the bit about larger calibers having nastier recoil that causes inaccuracy is not true. Most larger-caliber handguns have additional weight/length that maintains a good balance, and some manufacturers have more efficient recoil management in their pistols than others. A compact .45 might seem like a scary choice at first but chances are it will soak up recoil much, much better than one of those tiny pocket .380s that seem to be so popular at the moment.

Quote:
Originally Posted by slingshot View Post
If you plan on getting a permit, you should check the rules regarding the smallest caliber you can carry. Some states limit the smallest revolver to .38 caliber or semi-automatic to .32 caliber. For carry practice with, at least, what the smallest that is allowed.
Quote:
Originally Posted by slingshot View Post
Also, in some states, when you qualify for your permit with a semi-automatic, you can carry either that or a revolver. If you qualify with a revolver, you can carry only a revolver.
NM is one of these states, I can name that off the bat. I think our minimum reqs are .32ACP and you do have to qualify with both a pistol AND a revolver if you want to be able to carry both.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 0317 View Post
You can't do much on a revolver except clean it, change the grips and other minor things. You'll have to take it to a gunsmith or send it back to the factory for most repairs. Semi autos, especially Glocks, Sigs, Berettas, S&W M&P, SA XDm and other modern pistols are VERY easy to work on. Glock being the easiest of all.

Buy a Glock 19 OP.......
seconded, parts are plentiful, you can change out entire trigger mechanisms in a flash, lots of aftermarket support for sights, lights, holsters, ammo, barrels, etc.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuteTheMall View Post
No, I never heard of that. I'm certain PA doesn't.

Which states impose these minimum caliber limits?



I suggest you get training, the NRA has some nice basic beginners' classes and you can safely sample a variety.
I would also recommend an NRA class.

Quote:
Originally Posted by arrieros81 View Post
I think the issue with having a semiautomatic ccw, say for example, loose in a purse, is that in theory while grabbing it one might accidentally squeeze the trigger. It's a lot harder to do with the revolver. I'm not sure at all of how often accidental discharges with cc semis happen though, but again, in theory, it's something that is less likely to happen with the revolver because it's hard to pull that trigger
This is what holsters are for.

Quote:
Originally Posted by 0317 View Post
Well, we both can agree on "this". Probably the best purse gun is a J-frame .38/.357 OR Glock 26/27.
As long as a holster is involved.. but I still wouldn't encourage a revolver for purse carry... I've seen the insides of womens' purses, it wouldn't take much for a penny, a piece of gum, or a scrap of paper to lodge itself somewhere and render the gun inoperable.

Quote:
Originally Posted by ChuteTheMall View Post
HOLSTER







Quote:
Originally Posted by arrieros81 View Post
Where do you live where women holstering guns is common? I'm in the northeast and even if cc gets passed here I don't expect women to start wearing holsters. They're not fashionable. I'd carry in my purse too.
Quote:
Originally Posted by arrieros81 View Post
ok, so I see there are holsters that can be attached within a purse. I was only aware of holsters to be worn on the body.
Not only are there purses that one can attach a holster to, there are some very nice purses out there that have built in compartments that have holsters or are meant to be used solely for a handgun.

Quote:
Originally Posted by War Beagle View Post
Revolvers are the easiest hand guns to use, but they don't hold many rounds. Magazine fed handguns are more prone to jam, so maintenance and finding a round that works well in your gun is paramount. Loading a magazine shouldn't be a problem for anyone with the devices that are available that assist with that.
Taking a basic class and practicing get rid of a lot of the issues with semiautos. Most malfunctions are due to magazines not being fully seated or a round hanging up on the feed ramp... both are easily fixable.

Malfunctions related to magazines can be fixed by REALLY FIRMLY striking the base of the magazine, and racking the slide.

Feedramp issues can be solved by picking ammo more suitable to the gun (if it's finicky) or polishing the feed ramp... or making sure that ammo is all the way to the back of the mag when inserted.


OP, go to a gun store, gun show, or an indoor shooting range and shop around. See what fits your hand the best, and then pick the largest/most powerful caliber you can fully manage (e.g. make a quick follow up shot.) Pick something that you can get a good grip on with your strong hand... Consider options like night sights (glow in the dark) or rail mounted lights, interchangeable grips, capacity, reliability, and history of use by people in self defense scenarios, on both the average-Joe side and the law enforcement side.

just because you want a gun for self/home defense, doesn't mean you have to pick the smallest gun possible. Just because that snobby revolver or pocket auto is small and easily concealable doesn't mean it'll be pleasant to shoot. If you end up hating the way the gun feels when you're firing it, you won't practice as much, and the last thing you want is to be caught with your pants down when or if the time comes to actually use your handgun.
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Old 05-05-2014, 09:59 AM
 
Location: Two Rivers, WI
399 posts, read 284,273 times
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As a female, I just bought a Ruger LCP 9mm. It took me a little getting used to the longer pull stroke, but after a few rounds of target shooting, got pretty good at it. Nice compact size and easily slips into my purse or jacket.
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Old 05-05-2014, 01:27 PM
 
Location: Houston, TX
13,148 posts, read 7,398,957 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hoffdano View Post
I have a revolver (.38) and a Glock 19. My wife has a XDM 45. There is no way she would prefer a revolver, even though it is a bit easier to deal with. I'm not a fanboy of Glock though I like mine. It fits my hand better than the others I tried. Glocks are widespread, easier to service, and lots of accessories to fit them. I think the Glock 26 (9mm subcompact) would be a good purse gun.

I think the rail mounted flashlight is a good idea for a home gun.

In Texas you definitely would want to qualify for a CHL with a semi-auto so you aren't limited to a revolver.
+1. I pointed this out in my post, and I'm a woman in Texas as well. Although most of the posters say revolvers are easier to handle, I am friends with a few female shooters, and they all prefer semiautos. The jamming thing is not an issue if you have a reliable semiauto, IMO. It has been my experience that the semiautos that jam, jam over and over, and the ones that don't, don't.
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Old 05-06-2014, 12:35 AM
 
Location: SWUS
5,414 posts, read 7,628,292 times
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I feel like I should point out that the last issue that causes jamming in a semiauto is limp wristing. If you're not holding a semiauto the proper way (usually one with a polymer frame) it is possible to make the gun fail to cycle properly... But then it is easily rectified by practicing and getting a pistol that fits your hand well.

reliable semiautos are made by Beretta, Glock, Sig Sauer, HK, Smith and Wesson, CZ,etc.
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Old 05-06-2014, 12:57 AM
 
Location: San Antonio, TX
10,860 posts, read 18,892,348 times
Reputation: 25111
Quote:
Originally Posted by Gcs15 View Post
The layout of my house is one way up stairs. Then there is three flights of stairs to get up to my bedroom. I am putting in a door that should be able to hold for the time to get the gun out of the safe. I figure, between my dog, steps, door, it would be at least 3 mins, longer if they are trying to "sneak". Since what happened I feel vulnerable, and Everytime I hear the dogs bark in the middle of the night, or growl, or a noise, I am sure the person is trying to get in.

Mentally, I will do anything to protect my child, myself, my home. Legally, I have done everything correct. I have made reports, testified, etc. now I will take NRA classes to make sure I understand how to use it and the mechanics of it.
You have to do what you're comfortable with. Personally, when we have one of those nights where the dogs are restless and keep barking or I'm feeling edgy, I keep my gun within arm's reach, safety on, no round in the chamber. I know from past experience that if someone is really trying to get in, I get scared and it's more difficult to do simple things.

Since you have a child in the house, you need to consider the layout of the house and where your child will be when you're firing your gun, if someone does break in. In my house, we have safety drills where the kids practice going into their rooms and laying down flat on the floor until we come and tell them it's safe.
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