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Old 08-19-2014, 06:53 AM
 
16,438 posts, read 18,513,116 times
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Glock 19C.
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Old 08-20-2014, 06:05 AM
 
Location: WI
3,805 posts, read 8,508,451 times
Reputation: 2219
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris410 View Post
Like the title says, Newb here.

Just took the NRA basic pistol class with the wife this weekend. VERY informative and money well spent.

We shot about 100 rounds in a .22 pistol in the class.

Long story short. we both enjoyed target shooting and would like to get a pistol for home defense and for target practice at the range.

I was hoping someone could recommend the best gun for those applications. From the little knowledge I have is .22 are good for target practice because the ammo is cheap but no so good for self defense because the bullets are so small.

With that said we have never shot anything else. there is a range near us that rents guns. so we do plan on heading down there soon and trying a few different guns to see what feels good, but I was hoping you guys could steer me in a good direction and offer some feedback as well

Just thinking about it, I can see why people own many guns. But honestly for buget reasons that's really not an option right now. I just want something that we can both use for home defense and target shooting. she had no trouble with the .22 and I think she could handle a larger gun. she is physically fit and doesn't have tiny hands.
I've only been shooting for less then 2 years, started with a .22 for fun (main shooter is a Buckmark) and I try to hit the range monthly. Good .22 handguns can be had for $400 or less and ammo can be found (though difficult at times) making that a somewhat affordable 'sport' to get into. I did pick up a 9mm S&W some months ago to use as a potential self defense gun and as a learning tool with something with more 'kick' to see how comfortable it is for me. I've found the 9 has been easy to work with, but i'll admit (others may agree) it isnt the same as the .22 and will take practice to be consistent with it. But at least i have both styles to work with each range trip; and now have been able to get the wife to try the .22 to get her more involved.
My suggestion is get something you enjoy shooting and learning with, get the basics of safety and handling down, and then mix in other types/calibers as able. just my .02
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Old 08-20-2014, 11:55 AM
 
Location: Chattanooga, TN
2,773 posts, read 3,677,539 times
Reputation: 4236
Quote:
Originally Posted by crue cab View Post
For defense in your home, as a new shooter I would go with a double action revolver. Easy to learn, no mix up if its loaded or cocked or has a decocker.
I would suggest a 3" or 4" .357. That way you can shoot both .38 and .357. You can also get DA .22 revolvers for not too much money to keep in practice and not break the bank.
^-- This.

Good modern semi-autos are reliable and a lot of fun to shoot. You didn't mention concealed carry, so size isn't an issue. A full-sized 9mm semi has plenty of firepower with limited recoil force, and is an absolute joy at a gun range. Also, 9mm bullets are by far the cheapest and most readily-available pistol cartridges on the market, and more powerful self-defense rounds are just as lethal as most other rounds.

A Glock 19, a Springfield Arms XD9 (4" barrel), or a Smith & Wesson MP9 are all fine pistols used by police agencies all over the world, and all can be had for less than $500 if you shop around. Buy whichever one fits your hand the best. Buy all of them used, shoot a few magazines, and re-sell the ones you don't like for the same price. A step up would be a Sig Sauer P226, Heckler & Koch P30, or Walther PPQ for an increase in price. You said your local gun range rents guns, so take advantage of it. Shoot everything before buying.

HOWEVER, even with high-quality modern pistols, failures happen. Anything wrong with the shot (limp wrist, bit of dirt in the action, action caught in sheets or night clothes, bad cartridge, etc.) and the gun will jam. Unless you train extensively on what to do in the case of a jam, you now are armed with a nothing more than something to throw. In addition, if it is hammer fired, you have to worry about whether it is "cacked" or not (darn anti-profanity scripts...). If it has a safety, you have to worry about whether the safety is engaged or not. Do you leave a round in the chamber, or do you think you'll have the time and muscle control to rack the slide with someone breaking down your door?

Unless you plan on training for failure-to-fire situations and plan on leaving a round in the chamber, my recommendation for ALL gun "newbs" is to start with a .38Special full-frame revolver. Don't get a lightweight or compact version unless you're planning on carrying on your person. Get a 6-shot double-action stainless steel wheelgun. Then just point and pull the trigger.

If you enjoy shooting this, then by all means get a full-sized 9mm semi-auto to play with. After you practice with it a lot THEN you can trust your life to it.
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Old 08-26-2014, 04:44 PM
 
94 posts, read 68,752 times
Reputation: 68
You will get answers all over the place. I'm going to try something different that proves very true in the real world.

Buy the best, highest quality, most expensive weapon you can personally afford. If that is a $489 Glock G?(whatever) so be it. If it is a S&W 686 4", there you go. If it is a $3,000 Night Hawk or Wilson Combat custom 1911, alright. What about a $899 Sig Sauer P-series? Maybe a HK USP or a P30? You cannot go wrong with that mentality.

You're buying the best you can afford. Where guys get into trouble is when they make 100k and year and either buy because they don't know any better, or are just being cheap....a Jennings or some other such junker.


You won't ever be happy with it. You'll find out quickly it's a POS and will take even more of a haircut when you try to unload it. That's not to say later on you won't have some in your collection you wouldn't bet your life on, that happens sometimes. You are only buying one gun, you need to look at it in that perspective.

You won't ever be sorry then.

Buy the best you can afford at the time. Saving up helps a lot too. It's comical to watch guys buy 10 Taurus varieties, yet won't spend another $100-$200 on something much better. Hell, two fish sammies and a small fry at McD's is $9.49 now. lol

Get out of here thinking like that.
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Old 08-26-2014, 05:00 PM
 
94 posts, read 68,752 times
Reputation: 68
I just thought of a friend who got hosed pretty bad several years ago. He was looking for a handgun for HD use mostly. He ended up buying two Taurus 24/7s. One in 9mm and the other was a .45. He had just shy of $800 bucks in the pair. Both turned out to be junk, the front sight even flew off the first time he shot the .45. They were finicky and jammed a lot too.

I found him a cherry used 98% 3rd Gen Glock G-23 .40 S&W wearing Meprolite night sights for $425. He did not listen to me and passed when he bought those^. I don't know about the 9mm, but I know he only got $150 for the .45 when he sold it. Back then you could have gotten a brand new Sig Sauer P-series for about $750 as well. He would still own and be very happy with either that Glock or his new Sig.


Be smarter than Shawn!!

Last edited by Just The Facts Lady; 08-26-2014 at 05:10 PM..
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Old 08-26-2014, 07:06 PM
 
Location: Port Charlotte
3,926 posts, read 4,394,513 times
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A S&W .357 recolver is a great gun. Double action, point and shoot, limited recoil. Wife loves hers. I shoot a Springfield XD in 9mm, wife doesn't like the feel of it. I shot a Glock at the same time as the Springfield, just liked the accuracy and feel of the Springfield.

The answer is, go and rent several types, shoot them, and get what you like. Doesn't matter what we recommend. It is all about what works for you.
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Old 08-29-2014, 07:22 AM
PDD
 
Location: The Sand Hills of NC
8,776 posts, read 14,138,585 times
Reputation: 11850
Quote:
Originally Posted by chris410 View Post
Like the title says, Newb here.

Just took the NRA basic pistol class with the wife this weekend. VERY informative and money well spent.

We shot about 100 rounds in a .22 pistol in the class.

Long story short. we both enjoyed target shooting and would like to get a pistol for home defense and for target practice at the range.

I was hoping someone could recommend the best gun for those applications. From the little knowledge I have is .22 are good for target practice because the ammo is cheap but no so good for self defense because the bullets are so small.

With that said we have never shot anything else. there is a range near us that rents guns. so we do plan on heading down there soon and trying a few different guns to see what feels good, but I was hoping you guys could steer me in a good direction and offer some feedback as well

Just thinking about it, I can see why people own many guns. But honestly for buget reasons that's really not an option right now. I just want something that we can both use for home defense and target shooting. she had no trouble with the .22 and I think she could handle a larger gun. she is physically fit and doesn't have tiny hands.
I am a new gun owner and just like yourself I took the safety and CCW cou

The trouble with asking opinions of other gun owners is that everybody seems to be biased about certain brands/calibers. Even experts differ on this.

You already made the right decision by trying out different guns at the range.

Here is how I chose, I went on the internet via U tube and watched as many videos as I could and there seemed to be a clear consensus on which was the best gun to buy so that's what I bought.
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Old 08-29-2014, 11:52 PM
 
226 posts, read 169,860 times
Reputation: 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by jwkilgore View Post
^-- This.

Good modern semi-autos are reliable and a lot of fun to shoot. You didn't mention concealed carry, so size isn't an issue. A full-sized 9mm semi has plenty of firepower with limited recoil force, and is an absolute joy at a gun range. Also, 9mm bullets are by far the cheapest and most readily-available pistol cartridges on the market, and more powerful self-defense rounds are just as lethal as most other rounds.

A Glock 19, a Springfield Arms XD9 (4" barrel), or a Smith & Wesson MP9 are all fine pistols used by police agencies all over the world, and all can be had for less than $500 if you shop around. Buy whichever one fits your hand the best. Buy all of them used, shoot a few magazines, and re-sell the ones you don't like for the same price. A step up would be a Sig Sauer P226, Heckler & Koch P30, or Walther PPQ for an increase in price. You said your local gun range rents guns, so take advantage of it. Shoot everything before buying.

HOWEVER, even with high-quality modern pistols, failures happen. Anything wrong with the shot (limp wrist, bit of dirt in the action, action caught in sheets or night clothes, bad cartridge, etc.) and the gun will jam. Unless you train extensively on what to do in the case of a jam, you now are armed with a nothing more than something to throw. In addition, if it is hammer fired, you have to worry about whether it is "cacked" or not (darn anti-profanity scripts...). If it has a safety, you have to worry about whether the safety is engaged or not. Do you leave a round in the chamber, or do you think you'll have the time and muscle control to rack the slide with someone breaking down your door?

Unless you plan on training for failure-to-fire situations and plan on leaving a round in the chamber, my recommendation for ALL gun "newbs" is to start with a .38Special full-frame revolver. Don't get a lightweight or compact version unless you're planning on carrying on your person. Get a 6-shot double-action stainless steel wheelgun. Then just point and pull the trigger.

If you enjoy shooting this, then by all means get a full-sized 9mm semi-auto to play with. After you practice with it a lot THEN you can trust your life to it.
It's far easier to (tap-rack-shoot) to clear a .3% malfunction rate from a 99.7% reliable high quality modern semi auto than it is to unjam a locked up revolver action. It will need to go back to the factory or a gunsmith in most cases.


That semi auto "if" and only "if" it fails can be cleared in under 6 seconds with some training and practice. Even a double feed.
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Old 08-30-2014, 12:02 AM
 
226 posts, read 169,860 times
Reputation: 150
Quote:
Originally Posted by PDD View Post
I am a new gun owner and just like yourself I took the safety and CCW cou

The trouble with asking opinions of other gun owners is that everybody seems to be biased about certain brands/calibers. Even experts differ on this.

You already made the right decision by trying out different guns at the range.

Here is how I chose, I went on the internet via U tube and watched as many videos as I could and there seemed to be a clear consensus on which was the best gun to buy so that's what I bought.
Well, there you go. You ask an expert, you'll get an experts opinion. Do verify they are indeed a genuine expert and not a mall ninja first. For instance, I've seen plenty of stuff on YouTube that was plain and clear the person didn't have the slightest clue what he was talking about. Anyone who plays with weapons for 30+ years EVERY single day knows better. Same if the guy owns more than most mom and pop gun shops stock in his personal arsenal. Ie don't rail something if you don't own it or have first hand experience with shooting them or renting one. When someone starts to bash on such firearms as Glock, I turn it off. I also quit listening when the superior weapon (whatever)... in every way loses a coin toss because some newb isn't qualified for the evaluation. That Sig Sauer P-228 is junk, it won't shoot. I'm gonna go with operator error on that one. Same for a guy who can't hit anything with a CZ-75B or a 1911.
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Old 09-01-2014, 10:41 AM
 
Location: Chattanooga, TN
2,773 posts, read 3,677,539 times
Reputation: 4236
Quote:
Originally Posted by G2D2 View Post
It's far easier to (tap-rack-shoot) to clear a .3% malfunction rate from a 99.7% reliable high quality modern semi auto than it is to unjam a locked up revolver action. It will need to go back to the factory or a gunsmith in most cases.

That semi auto "if" and only "if" it fails can be cleared in under 6 seconds with some training and practice. Even a double feed.
Bold phrase is key. Every single person who ever recommends a semi-auto pistol over a revolver has to include that phrase, or else they are lying.

And for every example you mention about how a revolver can be rendered useless I can find a similar example for a semi. Yes, a revolver can eventually bind up if you never clean it. But that uncleaned revolver will keep shooting long after a similarly-priced semi-auto has started repeatedly failing. My father had a squib in a semi our last time to the range. We had to bring it back home and completely tear it down to clear it. Any weapon can experience a total failure requiring tools to clear. But a revolver will never be a victim of limp-wristing, FTE, failure to return to battery, etc.

I stand by everything I've said here and elsewhere:
- When comparing similarly priced weapons, a semi-auto will experience a failure far more often than a revolver. A $250 semi will fail more often than a $250 revolver. A $600 semi will fail more often than a $600 revolver.
- When not properly maintained or firing sub-standard ammunition, a semi-auto will fail sooner and more often than a similarly-priced revolver.
- A double-action revolver is always ready to fire. No safety to worry about, no need to rack the slide; just point and pull the trigger. Of course with a semi-auto you can leave one in the chamber and keep the safety off, but most people new to guns don't feel comfortable doing that.
- If you are willing to 1) invest in a high-quality semi-auto, 2) regularly train with it including training for clearing failures, 3) keep it loaded and in "Condition 1" (or 2 for striker-fired pistols), and 4) invest in high-quality self-defense ammo (and practice with it to make sure your weapon will shoot it reliably), then it's OK to trust your life to a semi-auto. This is especially true with new gun owners (see title again: "Newb question...").

That said, I carry a Walther PPS, which is a semi-auto. I keep one in the chamber and it doesn't even have a safety.

Last edited by jwkilgore; 09-01-2014 at 10:50 AM..
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