U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Hobbies and Recreation > Guns and Hunting
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 10-21-2016, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Herndon, VA
1,978 posts, read 1,960,753 times
Reputation: 6613

Advertisements

First and foremost is WD-40 is not a lubricant. It works very similar to a cleaner we used in the military called Naptha. It's great for getting old grease and grime out of areas, and I use it to clean things like chains, etc. You must use a proper lubricant after using it however. It's a great product, and is always in my garage. For cleaning guns it would work fantastic, but don't expect it to be a long lasting lubricant or rust protector.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-21-2016, 11:41 AM
 
Location: Texas
5,615 posts, read 12,527,276 times
Reputation: 10667
I saw a test a group of mental defectives ran on using WD-40. They took an AR15 using military ammo and were running the gun as fast as they could unload clips. The test was for 10,000 rounds. As the gun would start to falter, they would spray it with WD-40 and it would run again. At the end of the test, the gun looked like you had sprayed motor oil all over it and then threw several buckets of sand on the oil. It was a wreck. I don't recall if they said how much WD-40 they used but I'm assuming a lot.

I don't see the need for it on a gun at all. It's not a rust preventive as it's a dry lubricant after the vehicle dries. It doesn't provide any boundary lubrication at all. It does not have any extreme pressure properties. Considering there are many oils formulated with guns as the target use, why use anything else. The biggest issue I see about gun lubrication is most have no clue when to use oil and when to use grease.

And for those using motor oil or ATF, the oil is not formulated to deal with free oxygen at all. Oxidation WILL happen and your nice pristine weapon is going to be a ball of corrosion one day. I've seen many guns that had value turned to crap because someone told them motor oil or ATF was the real deal. Your guns, your money, and no, I can't fix stupid.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-21-2016, 02:25 PM
 
Location: San Francisco, California
1,953 posts, read 5,109,962 times
Reputation: 2294
Default Naptha military spray?

Quote:
Originally Posted by Robert20170 View Post
First and foremost is WD-40 is not a lubricant. It works very similar to a cleaner we used in the military called Naptha. It's great for getting old grease and grime out of areas, and I use it to clean things like chains, etc. You must use a proper lubricant after using it however. It's a great product, and is always in my garage. For cleaning guns it would work fantastic, but don't expect it to be a long lasting lubricant or rust protector.
I remember watching an old documentary about the Brown Water Navy in the Vietnam War, about the men who went out on PBR patrol boats and they showed one sailor cleaning his M60 MG with some type of light spray on the feed mechanism & linked ammo belt, it was probably something like WD40 or what the military uses "Naptha" ?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-24-2016, 12:26 PM
 
Location: Herndon, VA
1,978 posts, read 1,960,753 times
Reputation: 6613
Quote:
Originally Posted by mr bolo View Post
I remember watching an old documentary about the Brown Water Navy in the Vietnam War, about the men who went out on PBR patrol boats and they showed one sailor cleaning his M60 MG with some type of light spray on the feed mechanism & linked ammo belt, it was probably something like WD40 or what the military uses "Naptha" ?
My guess would be Naptha.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-25-2016, 07:47 AM
 
Location: Florida & Cebu, Philippines
2,808 posts, read 2,358,766 times
Reputation: 2867
My opinion is WD is not good to put on anywhere the primer might touch, I have seen rounds not fire when a person used WD to clean their firearms and it got on the primer.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-26-2016, 08:48 AM
 
Location: Charlotte
2,949 posts, read 3,106,632 times
Reputation: 1581
I use Ballistol as an all-in-one for my Glock 19.......works just fine. Kinda like the smell of it as well.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2019, 10:00 AM
 
Location: Billings, MT
9,455 posts, read 7,551,288 times
Reputation: 13057
Of course, one could always do a search for the MSDS for WD-40, and get the facts about what is in it.
But then, "facts" tend to destroy anecdotes. There is no fun in THAT!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2019, 01:57 PM
 
2 posts, read 258 times
Reputation: 10
I have 6 long guns. 2 bolt action, 1 lever action, 1 sxs shotgun and 1 single shot plus 1 revolver. All are at least 40 years old. I have used wd40 on them all since day 1. 1 auto hand gun about 5 years old that I use wd40 on. I do use oil on moving parts before shooting but after cleaning I wipe them down inside and out with wd40. All the bs about wd40 is just that "BS". You will find that most people that put out the bs have never really used it themselves. I have used for over 40 years. Never had to replace or repair any part or had any gun fail in anyway. Bluing still like new, no waxy build, no buildup, no varnish, no gun has ever burst into flames, And No rust, Inside or out. I wipe them down two times a year inside and out shot or not. Yes I have tried all the high $ brand name stuff but have never found anything that works near as good. Like I said. I have been using it for over 40 years on the same guns. No BS just first hand facts.

Last edited by tws3b2; 02-17-2019 at 02:10 PM.. Reason: Forgot to mention my muzzleloader of 20 years that I clean with soap and water. Absolutely Not one speck of rust.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2019, 02:06 PM
 
Location: Coastal Georgia
36,314 posts, read 44,450,110 times
Reputation: 60276
I donít know about guns, but a man who repairs old clocks told me never to use it on clock works. I believe he said it was because the WD40 would attract dust that would gum up the works.

I suppose if you are using it on gun parts that you can reach and wipe off, thatís different.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 02-17-2019, 08:00 PM
 
Location: Lost in Montana *recalculating*...
11,678 posts, read 15,164,733 times
Reputation: 11916
My God. Dredge up a cryptic post from yesteryear, lol.

Use solvent and oil. Nuff siad.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply

Quick Reply
Message:


Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Hobbies and Recreation > Guns and Hunting
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

© 2005-2019, Advameg, Inc. | Please obey Forum Rules | Terms of Use and Privacy Policy

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top