U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Hobbies and Recreation > Guns and Hunting
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 2 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
View detailed profile (Advanced) or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Reply Start New Thread
 
Old 06-23-2017, 10:55 AM
 
448 posts, read 190,902 times
Reputation: 353

Advertisements

I have some old powder. Two pounds of bullseye in cans from the 60s 70s. It is still dry and I shoot it. Works fine. But I wanted to get it out of the cans. I vacuum packed it. Double sealed it. Should keep it nice for a long time. I did the same to my small 1 pound cans of black powder. Put the whole can in the bag.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 06-23-2017, 07:44 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
13,388 posts, read 42,724,996 times
Reputation: 11470
I always thought that powder (smokeless) if kept dry and cool would keep for a long time, not sure vacuum packing it (in plastic) would help, maybe the plastic will encourage some sort of reaction that might degrade the powder?

You have any references for saying vacuum packing preserves it better?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-24-2017, 05:48 AM
 
448 posts, read 190,902 times
Reputation: 353
Quote:
Originally Posted by M3 Mitch View Post
I always thought that powder (smokeless) if kept dry and cool would keep for a long time, not sure vacuum packing it (in plastic) would help, maybe the plastic will encourage some sort of reaction that might degrade the powder?

You have any references for saying vacuum packing preserves it better?
I doubt that it will have any affect on the powder, any more than the plastic can it came in.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-24-2017, 05:46 PM
 
Location: PSL
7,275 posts, read 1,702,447 times
Reputation: 2603
Quote:
Originally Posted by spillerNburr View Post
I doubt that it will have any affect on the powder, any more than the plastic can it came in.
Speaking in a mechanics sense only, vacuum will remove moisture. That said, it may or may not alter the powders function. I would be interested in seeing how it performs whether you decrease or increase pressure and burn rate.

I remember when the vacuum sealers came out a guy at my rod and gun clubs used it on shotgun slugs and a box of 30-30 with bad effects. Primers were out of the pockets on the rifle rounds, and the crimp around the top of the slugs had un curled. He didn't risk firing it. I wonder what sort of an effect it could have on powder though...

I would have left some in the can and some in the bag and pour some in a pan and ignite it with a grill lighter to see if it changed, then load rounds as normal and see if you get a squib or possible boom...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-24-2017, 07:12 PM
 
448 posts, read 190,902 times
Reputation: 353
I have vacuum sealed cartridges with no ill affect. Its been done a lot and filmed on the net.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fXkWB-dR12Q
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-24-2017, 08:38 PM
 
Location: Texas
5,586 posts, read 11,843,095 times
Reputation: 10545
I know of 2 guys that will very heartily disagree with you about ammo vacuum packed. Both are in the ammo business, one in the manufacture, the other a powder formulator. I would think they have a clue. Both will tell you that if you do this especially with a double based powder, the nitrocellulose has a tendency to break part and it forms nitric acid. After about 5 years, they claim if you pull the bullets, the powder will no longer run out of the case but is basically glued together by the nitric acid. The acid will have caused a reaction to the brass from the inside and you can be in peril from weak brass and a big boom might be in your future. Powder only, I don't see where it would be a problem that you wouldn't be able to see before loading but I'm sure you're about to find out. My personal self, the factory container is good enough. I have powder that's over 30 years old still in the factory container and it still goes off the same. Not sure why you would vacuum seal it if the factory container is more than good enough.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-25-2017, 04:42 AM
 
448 posts, read 190,902 times
Reputation: 353
Quote:
Originally Posted by TrapperL View Post
I know of 2 guys that will very heartily disagree with you about ammo vacuum packed. Both are in the ammo business, one in the manufacture, the other a powder formulator. I would think they have a clue. Both will tell you that if you do this especially with a double based powder, the nitrocellulose has a tendency to break part and it forms nitric acid. After about 5 years, they claim if you pull the bullets, the powder will no longer run out of the case but is basically glued together by the nitric acid. The acid will have caused a reaction to the brass from the inside and you can be in peril from weak brass and a big boom might be in your future. Powder only, I don't see where it would be a problem that you wouldn't be able to see before loading but I'm sure you're about to find out. My personal self, the factory container is good enough. I have powder that's over 30 years old still in the factory container and it still goes off the same. Not sure why you would vacuum seal it if the factory container is more than good enough.
not sure I buy this. I have read on many forums people who vacuum seal and shoot it years later.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-25-2017, 05:22 AM
 
448 posts, read 190,902 times
Reputation: 353
Here is a good thread. Notice how those who say its bad its only hearsay. Those who did it and used it 30 years later with fine results say its OK. Vacuum sealing ammo... Yea or Nea?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-30-2017, 07:31 PM
 
Location: Not far from Fairbanks, AK
16,174 posts, read 27,435,915 times
Reputation: 11838
Quote:
Originally Posted by NY_refugee87 View Post
Speaking in a mechanics sense only, vacuum will remove moisture. That said, it may or may not alter the powders function. I would be interested in seeing how it performs whether you decrease or increase pressure and burn rate.

I remember when the vacuum sealers came out a guy at my rod and gun clubs used it on shotgun slugs and a box of 30-30 with bad effects. Primers were out of the pockets on the rifle rounds, and the crimp around the top of the slugs had un curled. He didn't risk firing it. I wonder what sort of an effect it could have on powder though...

I would have left some in the can and some in the bag and pour some in a pan and ignite it with a grill lighter to see if it changed, then load rounds as normal and see if you get a squib or possible boom...
That's a very good point. I was wondering the same thing, but you beat me to it. In the past, with my metal detector, I have found modern military rounds that were buried in the ground around 6". Just to see if the powered was still good, I pulled the bullets out, poured the powder in a small hole in the ground, and lit it with a match. The powder burned nice and fast as usual. I am certain that the moisture content in the grains of powder changes when you vacuum-pack it. Those military ammo cans that have a rubber seal on the lid would be my first choice for storing loaded ammo and gunpowder. I bet that WWII ammo that has been stored in military containers would still fire.

But vacuum-packing salmon fillets works very well as it slows freezer burn.

Last edited by RayinAK; 06-30-2017 at 08:10 PM..
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 06-30-2017, 08:46 PM
 
Location: PSL
7,275 posts, read 1,702,447 times
Reputation: 2603
Quote:
Originally Posted by RayinAK View Post
That's a very good point. I was wondering the same thing, but you beat me to it. In the past, with my metal detector, I have found modern military rounds that were buried in the ground around 6". Just to see if the powered was still good, I pulled the bullets out, poured the powder in a small hole in the ground, and lit it with a match. The powder burned nice and fast as usual. I am certain that the moisture content in the grains of powder changes when you vacuum-pack it. Those military ammo cans that have a rubber seal on the lid would be my first choice for storing loaded ammo and gunpowder. I bet that WWII ammo that has been stored in military containers would still fire.

But vacuum-packing salmon fillets works very well as it slows freezer burn.
I don't store powder in ammo cans God forbid it ignited for whatever reason you'd have a bomb...
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:

Over $104,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > General Forums > Hobbies and Recreation > Guns and Hunting
Follow City-Data.com founder on our Forum or

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2018, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 34, 35 - Top