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Old 12-23-2017, 12:23 AM
 
287 posts, read 160,998 times
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I've noticed in the movies of the 1970s, there were middle-aged actors holding revolvers with the other hand wrapped around the shooting hand's wrist.

I looked up the actors, and most of them served in the military and even during World War Two.

Was this used in real-life before isosceles and modified Weaver stance?
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Old 12-23-2017, 01:12 AM
 
Location: Houston
1,257 posts, read 2,144,154 times
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It almost makes sense in a single action way.

I tended to shoot one handed with my .41 mag Black Hawk. (I will literally have to grab up a revolver when I get back to the house and fiddle around now)

Semi auto for me is a 2 handed affair. No need to **** the hammer before every shot after the first on the 1911. 1st shot is double action (if you want) on most of my other semi auto pistols. I never need to re-position my hand unless I'm done shooting or need to reload.

I believe modern handgun stance(s) goes back to the 50's and that (to me) would point to less informed (untrained) persons depicting gun play.
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Old 12-23-2017, 08:37 AM
 
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I think actors do whatever they think looks good on camera, since they shoot only blanks. Think about the 80s when everyone on film was holding their guns sideways because Mel Gibson did it and it looked cool.
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Old 12-23-2017, 10:25 AM
 
Location: Maryland
810 posts, read 239,874 times
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Here's the walking, talking "Bible" on pistol shooting right now.

https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=ChSazF...ature=youtu.be
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Old 12-23-2017, 12:23 PM
 
Location: Vista, CA/Meadow Lakes, AK
229 posts, read 154,272 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JBAinTexas View Post
I've noticed in the movies of the 1970s, there were middle-aged actors holding revolvers with the other hand wrapped around the shooting hand's wrist.

I looked up the actors, and most of them served in the military and even during World War Two.

Was this used in real-life before isosceles and modified Weaver stance?
Yes, it was used. As was the tea cup hold.
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Old 12-26-2017, 11:59 PM
 
5,221 posts, read 2,380,595 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by JBAinTexas View Post
I've noticed in the movies of the 1970s, there were middle-aged actors holding revolvers with the other hand wrapped around the shooting hand's wrist.

I looked up the actors, and most of them served in the military and even during World War Two.

Was this used in real-life before isosceles and modified Weaver stance?
Virtually all handgun shooting in the WWII era was one handed. There wasnít any mainstream two handed pistol shooting until the 60ís.

The wrist grab method was used in the 60ís and 70ís but it was never very popular.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Squidlo View Post
It almost makes sense in a single action way.

I tended to shoot one handed with my .41 mag Black Hawk. (I will literally have to grab up a revolver when I get back to the house and fiddle around now)

Semi auto for me is a 2 handed affair. No need to **** the hammer before every shot after the first on the 1911. 1st shot is double action (if you want) on most of my other semi auto pistols. I never need to re-position my hand unless I'm done shooting or need to reload.

I believe modern handgun stance(s) goes back to the 50's and that (to me) would point to less informed (untrained) persons depicting gun play.
It doesnít make ANY SENSE, whether for single action or double action, revolver or semi auto. There is NO reason to ever use the wrist grab method.

The two handed technique really started in 1959 when it was used by Jack Weaver to win the 1959 Leatherslap match in Big Bear CA. Jeff Cooper eventually popularized it as the Weaver Stance. Still popular, it has been overtaken by the various versions of the Isosceles Stance.
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Old 12-27-2017, 07:15 AM
 
4,940 posts, read 4,646,736 times
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This poster for "Dirty Harry" is a good example.


https://media.gq.com/photos/55845567...rry-poster.jpg
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Old 12-27-2017, 12:54 PM
 
7,655 posts, read 5,409,513 times
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That was the old school grip that I learned as a teen shooting at the Cincinnati Police range where my friends dad was an instructor

He also taught us the tea cup grip that I still use with pocket pistols and my J-Frame
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Old 12-27-2017, 03:30 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
13,395 posts, read 42,738,435 times
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Been a long time since I saw anyone use this technique. Offhand I can't think of when it would be preferable to the Weaver, but, always good to think about alternatives.

At least when you are firing an "ambidextrous" gat, it makes sense to do at least a little shooting strong hand only, and weak hand only. Maybe even weak hand Weaver. Because in a practical situation, one hand/arm may be disabled, or you may only be able to stay behind cover if you use your weak hand.
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Old 12-27-2017, 10:42 PM
 
5,221 posts, read 2,380,595 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by mike1003 View Post
That was the old school grip that I learned as a teen shooting at the Cincinnati Police range where my friends dad was an instructor

He also taught us the tea cup grip that I still use with pocket pistols and my J-Frame
Why do you still use the tea cup grip with the little guns?
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