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Old 07-18-2018, 12:56 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
13,388 posts, read 42,724,996 times
Reputation: 11475

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Quote:
Originally Posted by TrapperL View Post
No, it will be slightly corrosive. It won't be as bad as mercury but you'll need to clean after using within probably 2-3 days. The formulation is Antimony Trisulphide, ground glass as a dispersant, sulfur, and potassium chloride.The sulfur will leave a coating in the barrel that is hydroscopic. Thr potassium chloride will leave a salt after combustion. Depending on how many rounds you run thru the gun determines how corrosive it is. A couple of hundred rounds I wouln't worry about. All things considered though, if you can't buy the ammo, this is a great alternative. You can use the old timers trick of carrying a can of lube with you and give it a coat so you can clean when you have time. That's what the old muzzle loaders used to keep the barrels frm rot.

OK, that is similar to the GI primers used in WWII, I have to disagree about "only a few rounds are OK" - you fire one round of corrosive, you need to clean the barrel "reasonably promptly" using a water-based solvent, or it will rust. Well you have more time in a dry climate, but if I shot any of this, I would be cleaning ASAP after shooting, and the same day at least.


Oil based solvents won't remove the sulfur or the chlorides.


Ordinary tap water is fine, putting the muzzle of a rifle you can clean from the breech into a bucket of hot soapy water and then pumping a few patches through, then dry it out, is probably the preferred way to handle it.



I hope the guys selling these kits are up-front about it being a corrosive primer, so many people these days have hardly heard of corrosive primers, much less used them.
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Old 07-18-2018, 02:02 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles
3,408 posts, read 1,962,223 times
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Well this is all well & good for you folks from Montana, Idaho & Texas, but I live in California. In my humble opinion, any California shooter who does not already own all the ammo he will ever need is simply not paying attention.
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Old 07-18-2018, 02:45 PM
 
Location: Texas
5,586 posts, read 11,843,095 times
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Quote:
OK, that is similar to the GI primers used in WWII, I have to disagree about "only a few rounds are OK" - you fire one round of corrosive, you need to clean the barrel "reasonably promptly" using a water-based solvent, or it will rust. Well you have more time in a dry climate, but if I shot any of this, I would be cleaning ASAP after shooting, and the same day at least.


Oil based solvents won't remove the sulfur or the chlorides.
Respectfully, that's wrong. First off, these are not mercury based like the GI stuff of the wars. You are correct that sulfur will not be totally removed by any oils BUT, the oils cut off any oxygen to the sulfur which stops any corrosion. Corrosion cannot exist without free radical oxygen. Same goes for salt rust. Rust as you probably know is an oxide which forms from the metal/salt and oxygen being in contact. It's the oil cutting off the oxygen which allows the shooter a few days to clean the weapon.

Considering though that most 22 barrels plate up with the lube/wax that comes on the ammo, it's doubtful any corrosion or rust would form over a short time anyway. I remember the old timers when I first got into rimfire competition that told me time and time again, never clean a 22 barrel or you'll screw up accuracy. Using a Remington 511 Score Master I actually did a test of that. The gun had never had a brush down the barrel as far as I know. I had been shooting the gun for probably 20 years and I got it used. I scrubbed the barrel and got all kinds of junk out of the barrel. It was squeaky clean and then I started shooting the ammo it liked best. Groups were large, real large by comparison to what the rifle normally would shoot. After 250 rounds, the accuracy came back to rifle. That was probably another 20 years ago and no, I won't clean the barrel on that rifle. Conversely, my benchrest 22 Ruger 10/22 with a new bull barrel starts shooting a little whacky after 100 rounds. It requires the barrel to be surgically clean. So they're not all the same but again, an oil down the barrel will buy you a few days before required cleaning. The heavier the oil the better but do not use any ester based lube, oil only. Esters absolutely suck with any humidity and cool temps at corrosion protection.
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Old 07-18-2018, 03:31 PM
 
Location: Eastern Washington
13,388 posts, read 42,724,996 times
Reputation: 11475
I think you are confusing a mercuric primer with a corrosive primer. The ammo used in WWII by American troops, with the exception of .30 Carbine, was corrosive primed, and those primers were very well thought of such that many handloaders used them after the war.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Potassium_perchlorate

A mercuric primer, earlier times, ruins a brass case chemically, perhaps you can head that off by washing the case in water immediately after firing.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mercury(II)_fulminate

Your story about not cleaning a .22 rimfire agrees with my experience. Most of my centerfires I use "grease" lubricated cast bullets, and in that case, except for a few gats that tend to build up some lead, I don't clean them either. The bore gets conditioned with bullet lube, leaving it alone is free and no effort, so that's what I like to do. Similar to .22 LR.



Of course you are right that each firearm is an individual, and what one "likes", another does not. So some .22 rifles do need to be cleaned periodically to maintain best accuracy.



Anyway thanks for the heads up that these "homebrew" .22s are corrosive primed. I'm not sure if I want to fool with them for that reason, but, if I do, yeah, I will be cleaning with a water based cleaner the same day.


Maybe I just hate rust more intensely than you do.



Good to discuss and debate with you, one of the handful of experts on here.


A quick note for any relatively inexperienced people reading this - while the .22 Winchester Magnum is indeed a ".22 rimfire" round, it has a true jacketed bullet, firing these leaves no lube in the barrel, so probably at least a patch with some Break-Free or similar cleaner/corrosion protectant would be a good idea after the shooting day is done.
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