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Old 07-15-2018, 05:45 PM
 
14 posts, read 5,600 times
Reputation: 21

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I am seriously questioning raising this topic for fear that it will spiral in ways I do not intend but here goes.

I researching potential areas for retirement which is still a handful of years away. Having lived all my life in the North (and West, including Colorado), one non-negotiable is warmer weather and little or no snow.

Hampton Roads ticks that box nicely. It ticks a few other boxes as well. It's close to a large body of water, the cost of housing is moderate (compared to the Northeast and Chicago), there are a good number of townhouse and condominium developments and there are both urban and suburban options. I would love if the taxation were more retiree friendly and clearly transportation is a mess but there will always be tradeoffs.

So here goes... I plan to be in my retirement locale until somewhere around 2050. My research has revealed the area, especially the Southern part, to be low in elevation and at significant risk of flooding, especially if climate trends (i.e., overall warming and rising see levels) continue and/or accelerate.

I know there are a number of thoughtful contributors here and I am not trolling. However, does anyone else have concerns about this issue or would anyone care to comment on this topic?

Thank you.
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Old 07-15-2018, 10:07 PM
 
Location: Virginia Beach
28 posts, read 12,852 times
Reputation: 60
I moved here from the North in the 80's and water (including flooding) is just part of the equation when researching housing options. Nearing retirement age, I plan to stay here because the water makes this place what it is. Certain areas flood because there is poor drainage, while others flood because they are near water. I have personally never had a problem, and I have lived on the water.

I am a degreed engineer (somewhat cranial) and wouldn't consider flooding to be a major consideration when moving here. Just be careful to research where you move and buy flood insurance if needed (or if you want to be very careful).
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Old 07-16-2018, 05:17 PM
 
Location: Jersey City
6,299 posts, read 15,653,640 times
Reputation: 5225
Seas are rising globally, but in Hampton Roads, there is also the problem of the land sinking. Due to use of groundwater and remaining subsidence still occurring since the Ice Age, the land in the Hampton Roads area is sinking at a relatively fast rate.

I saw a PBS documentary about it several years ago (I searched quickly and couldn't find it right away, will follow up if I come across it) that said the sea is expected to rise 18 more inches in Norfolk over the next 30-50 years (range counts for possible scenarios and factors) due to the rising water and sinking land.

That doesn't mean the whole area will be underwater, but when you're looking to buy a home there in 2050, the FEMA flood maps for the area might look quite a bit different than they do today. Some neighborhoods that seem high and dry today could have occasional flooding problems by then. And some areas that have occasional flooding problems now might have frequent flooding problems by then, and so on.
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Old 07-17-2018, 11:54 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
5,744 posts, read 5,492,250 times
Reputation: 3117
The area will eventually be underwater. But it will not the entirety of Hampton Roads. As you already know, the lowest point is sea level. This is what you can experience, easily, in Downtown Norfolk and Downtown Portsmouth. The other cities I am not that familiar with, but I do know that the two cities I've mentioned flood, easily, in the spring and the fall.

These are the areas I would be concerned with in 2050; a mile radius from any area that is already known to be an issue right now. My expectation is that Downtown Norfolk AND Downtown Portsmouth will either be elevated by then, I'm thinking Chicago right now, or that will be under consideration. As you should know other areas, like Miami Beach, are already doing this. We need to do this in Hampton Roads, and if possible just forgo existing infrastructure and concentrate whatever vain high rise projects we're considering to other parts of the city. We make fun of Town Center in Virginia Beach but they actually have the right idea, as far as the location is concerned. Hard to tell what the resort area/Oceanfront will be like by then.

Now you mention 2050 and even cities like New York will have to deal with flooding by then.

If the area stops building in swamps and elevates existing infrastructure there shouldn't be any major issues, barring the expense of elevating the infrastructure and maintaining that to begin with. If the area does not do this the projects will just to continue to move inward. Areas like Midtown Norfolk and Ghent could start seeing the projects, instead of Downtown. The housing projects in the city will not be around by then, and I can easily see Downtown taking over that land out of necessity. I don't see too many people in Downtown Portsmouth by then the way that things are going.

In any event, our tunnels are going to be even more expensive to operate, and our underpasses more difficult to keep open. The last time we had a strong rain here the underpasses in Norfolk were closed for several days, because the water was not going anywhere. This just added to the traffic here.

Norfolk needs to stop building. It is going to have the same problems that plagued Houston during their last hurricane. Too much runoff. No parks and no natural infrastructure to absorb this water. You're lucky if you get a city block for a park here. No elevation at all. That is my two cents, maybe an earful and more than you wanted to hear but seeing how other American cities dealt with these issues several decades ago I don't understand why cities like Houston and Norfolk have not made adjustments to deal with the obvious issues that are going to result from overbuilding. Plus all cities flood, flat or not, so this is a very common consideration anywhere that receives a ton of rainfall in a short period of time.

The city was talking about green spaces in all of the areas that currently flood, every time it rains, but has yet to deliver on that promise. Permanent bodies of water in these areas would disrupt the area and actually contribute to peace of mind. It will be interesting to see what happens.

Last edited by goofy328; 07-17-2018 at 12:18 PM..
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Old 07-18-2018, 08:39 AM
 
597 posts, read 463,556 times
Reputation: 826
Quote:
Originally Posted by wdrazek View Post
I am seriously questioning raising this topic for fear that it will spiral in ways I do not intend but here goes.

I researching potential areas for retirement which is still a handful of years away. Having lived all my life in the North (and West, including Colorado), one non-negotiable is warmer weather and little or no snow.

Hampton Roads ticks that box nicely. It ticks a few other boxes as well. It's close to a large body of water, the cost of housing is moderate (compared to the Northeast and Chicago), there are a good number of townhouse and condominium developments and there are both urban and suburban options. I would love if the taxation were more retiree friendly and clearly transportation is a mess but there will always be tradeoffs.

So here goes... I plan to be in my retirement locale until somewhere around 2050. My research has revealed the area, especially the Southern part, to be low in elevation and at significant risk of flooding, especially if climate trends (i.e., overall warming and rising see levels) continue and/or accelerate.

I know there are a number of thoughtful contributors here and I am not trolling. However, does anyone else have concerns about this issue or would anyone care to comment on this topic?

Thank you.
really 2050, sure you are not trolling?
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Old 07-18-2018, 08:50 AM
 
Location: Norfolk, VA
5,744 posts, read 5,492,250 times
Reputation: 3117
Quote:
Originally Posted by lovnova View Post
really 2050, sure you are not trolling?
That is a long time. Maybe OP plans to be 100 when he leaves.
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Old 07-19-2018, 06:45 AM
 
14 posts, read 5,600 times
Reputation: 21
Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
The area will eventually be underwater. But it will not the entirety of Hampton Roads. As you already know, the lowest point is sea level. This is what you can experience, easily, in Downtown Norfolk and Downtown Portsmouth. The other cities I am not that familiar with, but I do know that the two cities I've mentioned flood, easily, in the spring and the fall.

These are the areas I would be concerned with in 2050; a mile radius from any area that is already known to be an issue right now. My expectation is that Downtown Norfolk AND Downtown Portsmouth will either be elevated by then, I'm thinking Chicago right now, or that will be under consideration. As you should know other areas, like Miami Beach, are already doing this. We need to do this in Hampton Roads, and if possible just forgo existing infrastructure and concentrate whatever vain high rise projects we're considering to other parts of the city. We make fun of Town Center in Virginia Beach but they actually have the right idea, as far as the location is concerned. Hard to tell what the resort area/Oceanfront will be like by then.

Now you mention 2050 and even cities like New York will have to deal with flooding by then.

If the area stops building in swamps and elevates existing infrastructure there shouldn't be any major issues, barring the expense of elevating the infrastructure and maintaining that to begin with. If the area does not do this the projects will just to continue to move inward. Areas like Midtown Norfolk and Ghent could start seeing the projects, instead of Downtown. The housing projects in the city will not be around by then, and I can easily see Downtown taking over that land out of necessity. I don't see too many people in Downtown Portsmouth by then the way that things are going.

In any event, our tunnels are going to be even more expensive to operate, and our underpasses more difficult to keep open. The last time we had a strong rain here the underpasses in Norfolk were closed for several days, because the water was not going anywhere. This just added to the traffic here.

Norfolk needs to stop building. It is going to have the same problems that plagued Houston during their last hurricane. Too much runoff. No parks and no natural infrastructure to absorb this water. You're lucky if you get a city block for a park here. No elevation at all. That is my two cents, maybe an earful and more than you wanted to hear but seeing how other American cities dealt with these issues several decades ago I don't understand why cities like Houston and Norfolk have not made adjustments to deal with the obvious issues that are going to result from overbuilding. Plus all cities flood, flat or not, so this is a very common consideration anywhere that receives a ton of rainfall in a short period of time.

The city was talking about green spaces in all of the areas that currently flood, every time it rains, but has yet to deliver on that promise. Permanent bodies of water in these areas would disrupt the area and actually contribute to peace of mind. It will be interesting to see what happens.
You make several excellent points. The Eastern seaboard and the Gulf coast have issues up and down, with some areas like South Florida especially vulnerable. Also, the Mid-Atlantic which means Hampton Roads.

Some areas are being proactive. Others like Houston lack the political will and long term vision to create better outcomes. Despite the enormous resources they have.

It looks like HR is in the second camp. The region is splintered and each municipality acts as its own fiefdom. My bet is on localized, often hastily drawn solutions done under political pressure.
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Old 12-13-2018, 03:29 PM
 
Location: Warminster, PA
55 posts, read 27,794 times
Reputation: 17
Default Extreme Life Extension Becoming Possible

Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
That is a long time. Maybe OP plans to be 100 when he leaves.
Hi goofy and all, goofy was joking about the OP relocating at 100 but it's no longer far-fetched. I know but only because I've been researching longevity all my adult life (I'm 65 now). It's about not just lifespan but healthspan. For more information search Aubrey de Grey, transhumanist parties, Ira Pastor, Bill Faloon, and Church of Perpetual Life for starters. No i'm not interested in getting money. However, many of the biotechs are seeking donations, very much like ACS (cancer), Alzheimers Assoc., etc.
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Old 12-13-2018, 03:33 PM
 
Location: Warminster, PA
55 posts, read 27,794 times
Reputation: 17
Default Also looking for other unlimited life extensionists in VB

Quote:
Originally Posted by goofy328 View Post
That is a long time. Maybe OP plans to be 100 when he leaves.
Title says it all. Looking for other futurists and transhumanists in Virginia Beach/Williamsburg area who have a positive attitude about unlimited life extension. Many of the human trials for anti-aging and even aging reversal have been successful. Hoping to relo to the area along with my 65 year old husband and my mom in the spring.
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Old 12-16-2018, 08:41 PM
 
98 posts, read 463,222 times
Reputation: 117
Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
Seas are rising globally, but in Hampton Roads, there is also the problem of the land sinking. Due to use of groundwater and remaining subsidence still occurring since the Ice Age, the land in the Hampton Roads area is sinking at a relatively fast rate.

I saw a PBS documentary about it several years ago (I searched quickly and couldn't find it right away, will follow up if I come across it) that said the sea is expected to rise 18 more inches in Norfolk over the next 30-50 years (range counts for possible scenarios and factors) due to the rising water and sinking land.

That doesn't mean the whole area will be underwater, but when you're looking to buy a home there in 2050, the FEMA flood maps for the area might look quite a bit different than they do today. Some neighborhoods that seem high and dry today could have occasional flooding problems by then. And some areas that have occasional flooding problems now might have frequent flooding problems by then, and so on.
Here's an article from 2012 that speaks to this issue:

https://www.washingtonpost.com/natio...=.218865a1d415
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