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Old 11-15-2009, 01:18 AM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 10,812,724 times
Reputation: 2698

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Quote:
Originally Posted by nycricanpapi View Post
You are talking about another type of "life." What I am saying here is due to military there are more people and different kind of people. Hence hampton roads now is more diversed. Before it was only White and Blacks for the most part. Now, there are Asians, Hispanics etc... And it is still growing.
How many different types of "life" are there within this particular context? LOL Seems as though you're now equating "diversity" with "life." There are several lively metros around the world that are pretty much ethnically and racially homogenous. Tokyo anyone?
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Old 11-15-2009, 02:39 AM
 
Location: Jersey City
5,886 posts, read 14,261,442 times
Reputation: 4415
I thought Downtown Newport News looked more like this: http://www.hamptonroadsdailyphoto.co...wport-news.jpg

And it smells funny because it's right next to this: http://brillpublicaffairs.com/enviropolitics/Coal%20import%20facility%20in%20Newport%20News.jpg (broken link)
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Old 11-15-2009, 09:39 AM
 
Location: Virginia Beach/Norfolk.
1,556 posts, read 3,558,235 times
Reputation: 414
Quote:
Originally Posted by lammius View Post
I thought Downtown Newport News looked more like this: http://www.hamptonroadsdailyphoto.co...wport-news.jpg

And it smells funny because it's right next to this: http://brillpublicaffairs.com/enviropolitics/Coal%20import%20facility%20in%20Newport%20News.jpg (broken link)
Your exactly right.

That's their traditional downtown.

But they have also constructed a City Center (Town Center type thing) that has much more promise of economic growth.
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Old 12-07-2009, 09:39 PM
 
Location: Phoenix, AZ
12 posts, read 34,687 times
Reputation: 16
Quote:
Originally Posted by nycricanpapi View Post
Hampton Roads is a small metro. The military people are the only ones that gives Hampton Roads life. And the tourists during the summer.
A lot of people try to blame the population on the military as if the navy make up over a million of our residents and their families make up the other 700,000. If that was a factor then I guess we can say the same for San Diego, San Antonio, Jacksonville, and so on to every other area with a military. The military do play a major role in the Hampton Roads area but it's more to HR than the military.
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Old 12-07-2009, 10:51 PM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
10,770 posts, read 15,929,344 times
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Hampton Roads is like the Triangle. It's an ensemble metro made up of a variety of municipalities that have their own identities yet share in a region's common identity. Metros like Hampton Roads and the Triangle are intrinsicly different from metros where one city dominates at the expense of the other municipalities.
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Old 12-08-2009, 09:36 AM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 10,812,724 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
Metros like Hampton Roads and the Triangle are intrinsicly different from metros where one city dominates at the expense of the other municipalities.
I'm not so sure that where one city dominates, it's "at the expense" of the other municipalities in the region. Can you explain where you're coming from?
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Old 12-08-2009, 09:59 AM
 
Location: In the heights
15,863 posts, read 18,204,329 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
I'm not so sure that where one city dominates, it's "at the expense" of the other municipalities in the region. Can you explain where you're coming from?
Probably less name recognition, less opportunity for growth and notability, less ability to form a separate identity. Or even more directly, the possibility of getting annexed by the larger city. However, none of this really means that the quality of life in the other cities suffers so it might not be that important.
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Old 12-08-2009, 10:50 AM
 
Location: South Beach and DT Raleigh
10,770 posts, read 15,929,344 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Akhenaton06 View Post
I'm not so sure that where one city dominates, it's "at the expense" of the other municipalities in the region. Can you explain where you're coming from?
"At the expense" in that context refers mainly to a municipality's identity, or lack thereof. Does a community exist mostly as a feeder to a central city or does it have an identity, history and brand of its own on which it builds? I think this is a key difference.
Most major metros have significant municipalities around them but... do they really have an identity that stands alone? In the case of Hampton Roads, I would assert that both VA Beach and Norfolk clearly stand alone in identity. Others may also stand alone but I don't know enough about them to say.
In the case of the Triangle, I'd say that Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill all have an identity but I'd also say that Cary doesn't (despite its size). Now, before I get attacked by people from Cary, this does not mean that Cary is a bad place. It just means that Cary's entire existence is based on its nature as a suburban alternative to another place (mainly Raleigh).
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Old 12-08-2009, 03:20 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 10,812,724 times
Reputation: 2698
Quote:
Originally Posted by rnc2mbfl View Post
"At the expense" in that context refers mainly to a municipality's identity, or lack thereof. Does a community exist mostly as a feeder to a central city or does it have an identity, history and brand of its own on which it builds? I think this is a key difference.
Most major metros have significant municipalities around them but... do they really have an identity that stands alone? In the case of Hampton Roads, I would assert that both VA Beach and Norfolk clearly stand alone in identity. Others may also stand alone but I don't know enough about them to say.
In the case of the Triangle, I'd say that Raleigh, Durham and Chapel Hill all have an identity but I'd also say that Cary doesn't (despite its size). Now, before I get attacked by people from Cary, this does not mean that Cary is a bad place. It just means that Cary's entire existence is based on its nature as a suburban alternative to another place (mainly Raleigh).
Identities just change over time. The central cities in the Triangle were all pretty important in some way well before the region had its growth spurt. But looking at the Charlotte region, it wasn't really that way for the smaller cities in this region. Historically, Gastonia, Rock Hill, Concord, etc. had some sort of identity, but it wasn't really anything special; they were just your run-of-the-mill Carolina Piedmont textile towns. In this case, they benefit from their proximity to one strong, central city (mostly in the form of spillover) as they wouldn't have gotten much notoriety on their own. In some other metro areas, the smaller cities might have actually had a profile equal to or larger than that of the dominant central city at one time in the past (e.g., Alexandria, Arlington VA). However, over time, they have gotten swallowed up in the urbanized area of the dominant city, but they may retain their historic charm in some ways while benefiting economically from their inclusion in a large metro area. So I consider it something of a trade-off. The smaller cities might lose some of their identity, but they gain in prosperity in ways they probably couldn't have otherwise done.
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Old 12-08-2009, 03:27 PM
 
Location: metro ATL
8,190 posts, read 10,812,724 times
Reputation: 2698
Quote:
Originally Posted by OyCrumbler View Post
Probably less name recognition, less opportunity for growth and notability, less ability to form a separate identity. Or even more directly, the possibility of getting annexed by the larger city. However, none of this really means that the quality of life in the other cities suffers so it might not be that important.
If anything, I think a higher possibility for growth and notability exist due to the rising tide lifting all boats, especially for those towns that didn't really even have that strong of an identity to begin with. Most smaller towns/cities in large metro areas are now getting population and economic growth due to their inclusion in a metro area dominated by a large central city that they more than likely would not have received otherwise.
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