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Old 08-07-2011, 11:24 PM
 
1 posts, read 3,732 times
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The Hawaii is the great place of of job and mostly be seems that the jobs seeking is electronics and telecommunications.
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Old 08-08-2011, 08:35 AM
 
Location: Dublin, Ohio
349 posts, read 430,393 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by KauaiHiker View Post
I think MickeyE has some great tips for SUPPLEMENTING income, but you can't live on those. Being retired with a small pension and plenty of time to do handiwork/gardening for food, cash or barter is not the same as having a family, a low paying job, and not enough time left over to do anything else.

With the cost of housing (in a house), having a family, going to good schools, and covered by health insurance requires at least 60K in salary. There was another thread were there was consensus on 80K being better, with 100K being comfortable.

But that lifestyle is still a mainland relic. Whether by culture or by necessity, island-style is to live more crowded, often with family, have elders nearby for childcare, public school, not full insurance coverage, as the Maui doctor experiences. That definitely lowers expenses, BUT it is not readily available to recent transplants.

When I was let go from my job, I did handyman work, and my wife made and sold jewelery at craft fairs. Because we were just starting in these new fields, we weren't very good at marketing ourselves. We just couldn't ramp up the income fast enough, even after cutting all our expenses to keep our health insurance.
It's true most of the tips were for supplementing income, but there are people making a living at some of those jobs. Consider how much it costs to run a glass shop with the cost of propane and electric, a furnace running 24/7 and annealers running with loads of glass. Sometime google Paul Stankard (mainland paperweight maker) to see what an expert can do.

Even running a torch the cost of propane makes hot glass a job that you have to be pretty good at in order to pay the bills. You can make a lot of things in hot glass with a torch. I'd make beads, sculptures, paperweights, vases, perfume bottles, etc. etc. etc. A lot of these items can be sold through an online store and are light enough that shipping won't cost an arm and a leg.

Also google stickmakers to see some of the canes and walking sticks people are making a living with. Same with penturners.

It's hard to get started and you have to develop a following - I know hot glass artists here in Ohio that have patrons that buy or commission their works - in order to make a living wage. Look through the art galleries in Hawaii. There are some great artists there making a living with their art.

So it's not just supplemental income possibilities. It does take a lot of work to move up from "selling to support the hobby" to "selling to make a living".

Before my wife became ill and the economy hit a down trend she was one of the top wedding cake designers/bakers in the Columbus, Ohio area. She averaged 2 weddings a weekend (about all she wanted to do) almost every weekend and her cakes averaged $1000.00 each. That's a pretty good income. If she was able physically, she would still be doing cakes. It was a profession she loved and was very, very good at.

The big thing is to find out what you are good at and what you love doing in order to make a living at and be happy at a craft/hobby income producer.

Or find out what all these people are doing "online" that state here that they are moving to Hawaii and don't have to worry about getting a job because they have an online business they can do from anywhere. That's one I am researching now.

Mickey
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Old 08-08-2011, 01:35 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
1,082 posts, read 1,301,242 times
Reputation: 1215
Quote:
Originally Posted by Vicious View Post
3) Poor hospital support and physician community. There is a lot of physician backstabbing, I think mainly because it is a small island and every doctor is trying to keep their piece of the (already-small) patient "pie". New doctors are not particularly welcome since they are likely taking revenue from the "old guy's" business. The hospital facilities are actually better than I expected, but still not as good as modern mainland city hospitals.
Very informative post -- thanks. I have a question about your third point, though. This seems to condradict what I've read about how difficult it is on the outer islands for a newcomer to find a physician, because there are too few doctors, and each doctor has more patients than he or she can handle. Is it easy to find a doctor if you have good insurance? My wife and I would like to retire on the Big Island in a few years, which is where she's from, and the healthcare issue is one of negative factors. (She'll get Kaiser coverage for life as part of her retirement package.)
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Old 08-08-2011, 08:06 PM
 
239 posts, read 264,948 times
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If you have Kaiser than it's not a problem. Otherwise, it is very difficult to find a doctor. While we lived in Hilo my husband lost three doctors. The last one moved back to the mainland (his wife wanted to leave after having their two little ones.) In all cases, it happened very suddenly and the patients were left scrambling. My understanding is that they can't make enough money especially compared to the mainland where most of them are from.
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Old 08-09-2011, 02:51 PM
 
Location: Portland, OR
1,082 posts, read 1,301,242 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by isabella20 View Post
If you have Kaiser than it's not a problem. Otherwise, it is very difficult to find a doctor. While we lived in Hilo my husband lost three doctors. The last one moved back to the mainland (his wife wanted to leave after having their two little ones.) In all cases, it happened very suddenly and the patients were left scrambling. My understanding is that they can't make enough money especially compared to the mainland where most of them are from.
Thanks! I'm not sure what I'll do when the time comes, but I'll have another decade of work after my wife retires, and my company provides health insurance in Hawaii if I'm able to work remotely. After that, well, it's too far in the future to predict.

I read an article a couple years ago on the healthcare situation on Hawaii. Doctors get hit with a double whammy: One, most of the insurance companies don't pay out as much as they do on the mainland. Two, because there are no caps on malpractice suits, malpractice insurance is a lot higher than it is on the mainland. Apparently California had the same problem, until they passed legislation to put caps on malpractice suits. Anyway, one Big Island doctor interviewed in the article said that he grossed about $150,000 per year, but had to pay $100,000 in malpractice insurance. $50,000 isn't much of a salary when you're a doctor, so he was moving back to the mainland. I don't know what special-interest politics are at stake, but whenever the issue of malpractice caps is raised in the Hawaii state legislature, it's either voted down or not brought up for a vote.

We have a friend in Kona who brought her elderly mother from Honolulu to live with her. It took a long time to find a doctor who would take her on, but our friend said that the positive side is that her Kona doctor treats her like a human being, whereas her Honolulu doctors were rude and brusque.
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Old 08-10-2011, 04:46 PM
 
3 posts, read 7,889 times
Reputation: 11
Is there any large government sector in the atmospheric science, geology area?
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Old 08-10-2011, 05:28 PM
 
4,919 posts, read 10,727,824 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by damian023 View Post
Is there any large government sector in the atmospheric science, geology area?
Hawaii has many similar jobs as other places. The thing about Hawaii is that the number available varies so much. There may be a job for a snow blower mechanic in the papers but it may only be one and only available every 4 years, I wouldn;t count on getting that job on a whim. And even if the stars aliagn and you arrive the week that one elusive job becomes available, what if you live on kauai and the job is on the big island. Your qualifed, meet all the requiments, have all the certifcations they want, but are you going to commute to the BI for that job?

So you may see need for 20 nurses on Oahu but those on the other islands can't just commute everyday like those in Hoboken NJ commute to NYC everyday. That's what presents problems is Hawaii is islands seperated by oceans so where you live is just as much a consideration as the vailability of jobs. A company opens a office in Hilo looking for 10 programmers and people see that from the mainland so they decide that the BI is where they should move. they come and suddenly they can;t get a job as a programmer since company already hired but now there are 10 programmer jobs on Oahu.

Also if a new resort is opening there may be a hundred jobs in all sorts of fields posted. To some it may look like Hawaii has jobs in resorts going begging. Sp they come and guess what, the resort completed hiringt he week before and now it may be years before some of those positions become available again.

The reason people recommend that you have a job ahead of a move is because you never know where, what or how many jobs will be available when you need that job.
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Old 08-10-2011, 09:38 PM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
6,000 posts, read 9,808,891 times
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Yup, PacificFlights has a very valid point. Honolulu is a big city - BUT - it's all by itself. It is the driving force on Oahu, too, and there aren't all that many jobs in the smaller outlying towns on Oahu. Most folks go from the outlying towns to Honolulu for work which is why the traffic on Oahu is so horrendous. Honolulu is the only true "city" in the state, really. So, if you can't find a job in Honolulu on Oahu you pretty much have to look on the other other islands and all of them have a much lower population number and density.

On the Island of Hawaii, "the Big Island", commuting from one side of the island to the other is too expensive now that gas has gotten so high so you basically have two employment areas on this island both of which are very small compared to Honolulu. However, the rents are less and the competition for just about everything else from a picnic table at the beach to a parking space at the grocery store is a lot less, too. However, there are a lot less beaches and a lot less grocery stores so you have less choice.
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Old 08-11-2011, 10:47 AM
 
1,022 posts, read 146,918 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by katherineeobryan View Post
The Hawaii is the great place of of job and mostly be seems that the jobs seeking is electronics and telecommunications.
Try again - please!!!!
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Old 08-11-2011, 10:48 AM
 
1,022 posts, read 146,918 times
Reputation: 270
Quote:
Originally Posted by damian023 View Post
Is there any large government sector in the atmospheric science, geology area?
www.usajobs.com
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