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Old 01-13-2008, 10:02 PM
 
10 posts, read 69,665 times
Reputation: 20
Smile Your story: Was it worth it to move to Hawaii?

Aloha,

This question is mainly for mainlanders who moved to Hawaii.

I've been doing as much research as I can lately to try and weigh the pros and cons of moving to Hawaii, and trying to locate a safe place to live. but the most insightful things I've read have come out of online forums, reading what people who live in Hawaii have to say about life there. And to me, it seems as if Hawaii has just as many downsides as it does benefits.

It is beautiful, but expensive. A broad range of people, but also much racism. Not so much violent crime (though it is rising), but among the nation's worst rates of property crime, fueled by the growing Ice problem. A land of Aloha Spirit, but that spirit being broken by those seeking to harm their fellow man. The land is being developed, both for good (jobs, affordable housing), and for bad (overexpansion).

Local governments are said to be corrupt by some, and others say that the local police departments cannot or will not be able to combat rising crime. An air of uncertainty over Hawaii's future looms, and for those planning on raising children in the islands, there are large fears of the growing numbers of gangs, violence in schools, racism among pupils, poor school environments and widely varying test scores.

With so many people voicing so many passionate concerns, does any hope seem in sight that things will start to get better? Can enough voices change things for the better? Or do most of us feel that things will only get worse? Is hawaii truly "safe", is it truly "happy", for you, for your families?

Is it worth it to continue to have the dream of living in Hawaii, even knowing that you may sacrifice your peace of mind, to not know for sure if your car, your home, will be safe from thieves from day to day? To worry about your kids at school, to work multiple jobs just to make ends meet and enjoy your islands only on the weekends?

Can the feeling of Aloha still persevere even after facing all of the above? I would like to know. I love Hawaii, have loved Hawaii all of my life, and in my heart it feels like the one true place I belong. But the Hawaii that I grew up dreaming of didn't contain the fears of crime that are there today. This darker side of Hawaii was something I didn't know of until very recently. But my love of the islands still is strong.

Perhaps things aren't as bad as they seem from outside. Maybe a lot of passion towards preserving Hawaii as a great place to live has made people shout just a little bit louder about problems they might see. But from over here, it seems like the problems are pretty big. I don't want to give up my dream of living there, the thought is heartbreaking, but is the sacrifice worth it?

Tell me your story. I want to hear. When you moved to Hawaii, what was it like for you? What is it like now? Did you adjust easily to the islands? Were you accepted? How will you face the growing problems in the islands? And could they ever cause you to move back to the mainland? What can all of us do to make a better hawaii for our future?

Mahalo,

Brandon

 
Old 01-13-2008, 11:32 PM
 
11 posts, read 34,436 times
Reputation: 26
And your point?....The same things could be wriitten about New York City, Dallas, Tx., LA, and on and on. There are no perfect places to live, at least I haven't found any, but Hawaii, with all its warts and wrinkles, seems as perfect as I've found. I think all any of us can do is to find a place that we love and work to make it even more of what we want. If you wait to find a "perfect" place, you may never go anywhere. But I would wish for you to find your heart's desire.
 
Old 01-14-2008, 12:06 AM
 
2,043 posts, read 2,728,751 times
Reputation: 2597
Aloha Brandon,
I hear what you are asking and I understand your concerns. I have them, too. Yet, I sit here in my wonderful little cottage 3 miles from the city limits. Only 5 homes in our neighborhood, wondering if the car that drove by is casing my home or my cars. Wondering if the neighbor who just turned his neighbor into the Humane Society is concerned that his dog just relieved himself in my yard. The worries and woes go on and on. It's everywhere. But... 'Aloha' is within you. When you go into the supermarket does the checker or the stocker greet you and smile at you? Do your coworkers smile when you walk in to start your shift? Are they happy to see you? Are you happy to see them? Always something nice to say and/or do for anyone else? I bet so. You sound like you have much 'Aloha' in your heart. The islands are calling you.
A hui hou
Koale
 
Old 01-14-2008, 02:45 AM
 
10 posts, read 69,665 times
Reputation: 20
Quote:
Originally Posted by Koale View Post
Aloha Brandon,
I hear what you are asking and I understand your concerns. I have them, too. Yet, I sit here in my wonderful little cottage 3 miles from the city limits. Only 5 homes in our neighborhood, wondering if the car that drove by is casing my home or my cars. Wondering if the neighbor who just turned his neighbor into the Humane Society is concerned that his dog just relieved himself in my yard. The worries and woes go on and on. It's everywhere. But... 'Aloha' is within you. When you go into the supermarket does the checker or the stocker greet you and smile at you? Do your coworkers smile when you walk in to start your shift? Are they happy to see you? Are you happy to see them? Always something nice to say and/or do for anyone else? I bet so. You sound like you have much 'Aloha' in your heart. The islands are calling you.
A hui hou
Koale

Thank you for the kind words, I do try my best, though over here on the mainland I sometimes catch people off guard, I'll start up a conversation with a brand new-hire at work like they've been there for years. Some people respond well to that, others dislike it intensely. I've had to learn to keep more to myself than I used to with some people.

To bbw:

I come from a small town in Idaho, and I've grown used to having a pretty safe feeling around my home. Knowing the higher crime of Hawaii would make me more nervous, I'm trying to gauge if people found it worth the additional worry in order to live in paradise. If I can learn where the safe areas are in Hawaii before we move, it might save us a lot of heartache in the end.

Mahalo!
 
Old 01-14-2008, 10:10 AM
Status: "hanging up my guns...hanging on to my lady" (set 27 days ago)
 
Location: NW Nevada
6,752 posts, read 4,596,194 times
Reputation: 3958
My wife and I are looking very hard at a move to the islands and the concerns and questions you are adressing here are on the top of our list as well. We spent 80 % of the time we had on our last visit looking about, talking to locals, and interacting as much as possible. I plan on taking some time off from my business to come over and actually jump in to life there, getting up and going to work, and living a daily routine. From the vast amount of information we were able to glean from local folks there the problems with crime, corruption etc, were really no worse than what we see here in NV on a daily basis. As far as feeling secure, I feel that we all need to take our safety as a personal responsibility. Myself, I have never relied on Law Enforcement agencies as my first line of defense. In the many places I have lived ( some of them being pretty rough!) I have only been victimized once and that was because I lapsed into complacency and presented an inviting target. I am sure Paradise has it's share of predators, and if a person presents themselves as unaware attack is certain. ( this is true ANYWHERE) Honest citizens who are close knit and watch out for one another are a criminals worst nightmare and ,thus far, it has seemed to me that decent, honest , hard working folks are the majority over there. Perhaps, exploring the option of talking with neighbors, friends, coworkers, etc and organizing a network of concerned citizens to adress the issues you have brought up here could be a place to start? I've seen it work in a lot of other places. United we Stand ,so to speak. All in all we have no fate but what we make for ourselves. Thusly crime ,corruption, overdevelopment etc, will only go as far as decent folks allow them to. Carry on the flame ya'll! Sincerely, a fellow concerned person.
 
Old 01-14-2008, 12:36 PM
 
99 posts, read 316,761 times
Reputation: 37
With so many people voicing so many passionate concerns, does any hope seem in sight that things will start to get better?

Yes, there is always hope in any land as long as there are good people who care enough to make a positive difference. It all depends on if the positive people outweigh the negative people.


Can enough voices change things for the better? Depends on who is in the majority--positive people or negative



Or do most of us feel that things will only get worse? The media here seems to play to the fears and concerns and that can do more damage than good. As long as people here are smart enough to not let the media influence them to think in terms of doom and gloom they may continue to fight for progress with a winning spirit


Is hawaii truly "safe", is it truly "happy", for you, for your families? Yes, it is definitely safe!! I'm amazed how safe the Hawaiians have been able to keep this place considering the potential threats that loom about

My son who is Caucasian is very happy here. He loves to swim and is very outgoing.

Is it worth it to continue to have the dream of living in Hawaii, even knowing that you may sacrifice your peace of mind, to not know for sure if your car, your home, will be safe from thieves from day to day? Yes, it's worth it. If you are rich here or upper class, there shouldn't be any worries because money can solve most of your problems.


Can the feeling of Aloha still persevere even after facing all of the above? For tourists, military, and weathy families, yes.


As for crime, I was much more afraid for my family's safety in the mainland compared to here. Here, I have no worries about crime and always feel safe.

Tell me your story. I want to hear. When you moved to Hawaii, what was it like for you?

We have been here 7 months. It has been an adventure but we miss our families and friends from the mainland. You have to be outgoing to make relationships here. It can be done but requires effort and taking risks.

We moved here with the intention of staying temporarily. We're not trying to get settled, but we are positive people and can appreciate the advantages of living here: aloha spirit, beauty, beaches, climate, love of the land, environment friendly, safety. What we don't like: overcrowded sections of the island, difficulty parking, cost of living and low wages, public school reputations, missing our family and friends from the mainland.
 
Old 01-14-2008, 01:48 PM
 
10 posts, read 69,665 times
Reputation: 20
On another forum, someone wrote this to me. Would you say this is accurate?


Quote:
Listen, you sound like a nice guy, but seriously, stay on the mainland, unless you want to be seriously disillusioned. Even your comment above. Get real. First, there is no common goal in Hawaii. It's like saying there is a common goal in texas. Second, even if there were a common goal, for the first 20 years you are here, no one would listen to you anyway, because you are a haole, and a malahini. If you were Filipino, fresh off the boat from the Philippines and didn't speak english you would be listened to more than a haole. Even if you moved, say, to whitebread transplant Kihei, the white people who moved here five years ago wouldn't even listen to you, as they see themselves as "local" and look down on malahini (although everyone else sees them for what they are, white transplants). And the people like myself who were actually born and raised here? Doesn't matter how good your ideas are. Doesn't matter how good of a person you are. That is the way it is. Any idea will be dismissed with one of the following rejoinders:

- Maybe that's how they do it on the mainland, but this is Hawaii.
- This isn't the mainland.
- How long have you been here?
- Don't rock the boat.
- Shut up, haole.
- Go home, haole.
I'm not joking. I have seen so many people with exactly your attitude come here with stars in their eyes and the spirit of Aloha in their hearts leave in a year or two, bitter, disillusioned and newly racist to boot. It **** but the single most important important fact of your existence in Hawaii is the color of your skin, and yours is the wrong color.

I don't know, though. Maybe you would fit in in Paia with the rest of the hippie wierdos. You could pretend to be Hawaiian but only have haole friends.
 
Old 01-14-2008, 02:03 PM
 
Location: fern forest, glenwood, hawai'i
850 posts, read 2,954,924 times
Reputation: 169
give me a break! sounds like that person is a racist and doesn't want you here. or rather, would like you to live in, "paia with the rest of the hippie wierdos." no place is perfect. the only way to find out is to come for extended visits if you can afford it. a one or two week vacation isn't going to do it for you.
 
Old 01-14-2008, 02:45 PM
 
2 posts, read 28,495 times
Reputation: 25
Having just posted a question of my own about my upcoming move to Oahu in another thread on this board, I found this thread very interesting.

A bit about me - I am caucasian (British family heritage), and currently live in San Francisco. San Francisco, as most of you know, is an intense mix of every race and ethnicity you can imagine. Racism just wouldn't work here. More importantly, any sort of racism does more harm to the racist than to the target of the racist behavior. ANY sort of racism is equated with stupidity and ignorance. That's just how things are in San Francisco.

What I've read in this thread is interesting to me because it sounds as though there is a great deal of anti-white racism among certain of Hawaii's residents. The above rant which contained the phrases "shut up haole" and "go home haole". Literally made me laugh. First of all... I have a news flash: Hawaii is a state. As Americans of ANY color or ethnic persuasion, none of us have to "shut up" or "go home". As Americans, ALL of America, be it Hawaii, New York, Alaska, or Florida IS our "home". Secondly, don't call me a "haole". It's meant in a disrespectful, racist manner, and as such, it has no place in any dialogue between fellow Americans.

If I want to move to Hawaii because I like Hawaii, I will.

No ignorant, backward, racist philosophy or ranting will prevent me from doing so.

While I will take practical precautions against being victimized by racism, (such as not moving into a neighborhood known to be hostile to causcasians), I will not be frightened out of my plans to move by any sort of racist rant. Frankly, I just find it amazing that in the year 2008, there is still dialogue in which people of a certain color or ethnicity are being "warned" not to move to a state in the USA. That is nothing more than racist coercion. It's just absurd. Worry less about the color of people's skin, and more about the color of the earth - namely, keeping it green.

I love Hawaii. I'm moving to Hawaii. I intend to be very happy - probably much happier than anyone who is concerning themselves with some sort of racial agenda.

My advice - ignore the racists - whatever color you are.


---Berus

Last edited by Berus; 01-14-2008 at 02:46 PM.. Reason: spell correction
 
Old 01-14-2008, 03:12 PM
 
Location: Kauai
649 posts, read 2,230,064 times
Reputation: 428
Quote:
Originally Posted by Berus View Post
What I've read in this thread is interesting to me because it sounds as though there is a great deal of anti-white racism among certain of Hawaii's residents. The above rant which contained the phrases "shut up haole" and "go home haole". Literally made me laugh. First of all... I have a news flash: Hawaii is a state. As Americans of ANY color or ethnic persuasion, none of us have to "shut up" or "go home". As Americans, ALL of America, be it Hawaii, New York, Alaska, or Florida IS our "home". Secondly, don't call me a "haole". It's meant in a disrespectful, racist manner, and as such, it has no place in any dialogue between fellow Americans.

If I want to move to Hawaii because I like Hawaii, I will.

No ignorant, backward, racist philosophy or ranting will prevent me from doing so.

While I will take practical precautions against being victimized by racism, (such as not moving into a neighborhood known to be hostile to causcasians), I will not be frightened out of my plans to move by any sort of racist rant. Frankly, I just find it amazing that in the year 2008, there is still dialogue in which people of a certain color or ethnicity are being "warned" not to move to a state in the USA. That is nothing more than racist coercion. It's just absurd. Worry less about the color of people's skin, and more about the color of the earth - namely, keeping it green.

I love Hawaii. I'm moving to Hawaii. I intend to be very happy - probably much happier than anyone who is concerning themselves with some sort of racial agenda.

My advice - ignore the racists - whatever color you are.
Well said! I agree wholeheartedly.

While visiting Hawai'i, my brother (who embodies the spirit of Aloha more than almost anyone I know) was, for no apparent reason, the recipient of a "go home, haole" slur, while simply enjoying the beach with his two children and not bothering anyone. I could not believe this - I have never been subjected to such a thing, during any of my five visits to four of the islands. Still, even if I were, it certainly would not stop me from moving there - unless it were a daily occurrence, and not tempered by having met some very lovely people of all races in the same locale.

I just chalk it up to ignorance and stupidity, and meanness, all of which unfortunately do exist everywhere. Move down the beach, and teach your children not to hate back. 'nuff said.
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