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Old 08-27-2008, 03:29 AM
lei
 
5 posts, read 18,941 times
Reputation: 13
Default Surviving

Having to eat healthy, and keep things affordable in our family has it's challenges. We garden, but with the rise in the cost of water & sewer, has had to reduce it's size. (as we weighed out the cost) Having to quit work and care for an elderly parent, also made it ever more grateful for sharing with friends and neighbors. As he did, share your bread and it would multiply. We try our best.
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Old 08-29-2008, 03:23 PM
 
Location: Honolulu, HI
274 posts, read 1,106,076 times
Reputation: 193
I would not call it a "food crisis", but cost of everything is higher - especially gas and food. I do make conscience effort not to eat out as mush as I used to and bring home-lunch to work most days.
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Old 08-31-2008, 01:52 PM
 
Location: Maui & Vancouver
21 posts, read 128,691 times
Reputation: 21
Fuel, food, housing, all expensive in HI. Yes, the crises is real.
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Old 09-06-2008, 09:26 AM
 
25 posts, read 89,326 times
Reputation: 17
Sorry to hear it hasn't changed since I lived in Hawaii. I still remember having to make a choice between hamburger or chicken to eat for the week.
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Old 09-06-2008, 02:33 PM
 
4,919 posts, read 10,116,526 times
Reputation: 5746
There is NO food crisis!
There is NO housing crisis!
There is NO gas crisis!
There is NO shopping crisis!

Many people who moved to Hawaii were glassy eyed over moving to paradise and woefully underestimated their financial situation. They would never had stretched their financial picture to the limits they do where they came from, but did so when they moved to Hawaii. They are operated on the fringes of financial failure and can not adjust to any upward cost move. Hawaii always had high gas price. Hawaii always had high food prices. Hawaii always had high housing cost. Hawaii always had high everything. So what's the big deal?

The price rises on Hawaii are inline with prices rised elsewhere in the country. Its just that everywhere else, people wouldn't move to Beverly Hills on a waiters salary, or Park Avenue on a nurses salary, or expect a beach front home on the Hamptons as a sales clerk at Walmart, but they do move to sky high cost of living Hawaii without having the financial ability to afford it.

Instead of worrying or complaining about Hawaii's cost of living, move to a place you CAN afford. Hawaii is a very expensive place to live, if you don't have the financial resources to support the lifestyle you want, Nebraska may really be a better choice.

This is not to make anyone mad, but gee folks, use the same common sense you would moving anywhere else in the country.

Last edited by 7th generation; 09-07-2008 at 05:42 PM.. Reason: language
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Old 09-07-2008, 01:12 AM
 
Location: Hawaii
8 posts, read 23,906 times
Reputation: 14
It all starts in the mainland first and sweeps over the land like a disease. It will be like that everywhere and the people who don't know how to suvive off the land or aren't willing to will feel it the worst.
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Old 09-07-2008, 01:05 PM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
5,771 posts, read 9,290,922 times
Reputation: 2891
In a lot of areas of Hawaii, they can't live off the land. They live in apartment buildings with no avocado trees! No place for a few hens to scratch up bugs, either!

I suppose they could put container gardens on their lanai and we've been growing hydroponic lettuce in gallon milk jugs. The garden stores have "net" pots - little flower pots made of stiff plastic net and they are small, about two inches wide by three inches tall. Cut the top off a milk jug to fit the net pot in, put a teaspoon of hydroponic fertilizer in the jug, fill it with water and stir. Cover the jug with something to block the light from getting in. Aluminum foil or put the jug inside a cardboard box or cover it with an old cloth, etc. Put the net pot in the top of the jug (but somewhere it will get the light) and put in something to hold the seed, the garden stores sell things called "oasis" cubes or I use a bit of quilt batting or the fluffy dog toy insides that have been pulled out when the dogs tear up a stuffed toy. Add two or three lettuce seeds to the top of whatever material you put in there to hold the seed (in the hot summer months, use romaine, red lettuce or butter crunch seeds) and then put the jug somewhere it will get some light and wait about a month. When all the water is gone out of the jug the lettuce is ready to eat.

Refill with water, another teaspoon of fertilizer and you can reuse the jug and the net pot. We keep enough of these jugs so we can have two heads of lettuce a week and they make great gifts for your neighbors, especially if the lettuce is already growing.

We are still working out how to grow tomatoes and cucumbers to go along with the lettuce, they take longer to grow so we are trying five gallon buckets or the smaller ones we get for free from the local bakery.

Sprouts grow easy enough in a big gallon sized glass jar. Soak the alfalfa sprout seeds (you can get those at a health food store that sells bulk seeds) in some water overnight. Pour the water off the next morning and swirl the jar so the seeds stick to the sides. Put the jar on it's side and cover the mouth with a dishrag so bugs won't get in. A rubber band and a bit of netting will keep bugs out and make rinsing the seeds easy, too. Twice a day rinse the seeds with fresh water and pour it off leaving the seeds stuck to the side. After about ten days, you will have a jar full of sprouts to eat.

Things are getting hard all over, and this will work on the mainland as well as Hawaii!
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Old 09-08-2008, 08:38 AM
 
Location: Kailua, Oahu, HI and San Diego, CA
1,127 posts, read 3,851,036 times
Reputation: 636
Quote:
Originally Posted by hotzcatz View Post
I suppose they could put container gardens on their lanai and we've been growing hydroponic lettuce in gallon milk jugs. The garden stores have "net" pots - little flower pots made of stiff plastic net and they are small, about two inches wide by three inches tall. Cut the top off a milk jug to fit the net pot in, put a teaspoon of hydroponic fertilizer in the jug, fill it with water and stir. Cover the jug with something to block the light from getting in. Aluminum foil or put the jug inside a cardboard box or cover it with an old cloth, etc. Put the net pot in the top of the jug (but somewhere it will get the light) and put in something to hold the seed, the garden stores sell things called "oasis" cubes or I use a bit of quilt batting or the fluffy dog toy insides that have been pulled out when the dogs tear up a stuffed toy. Add two or three lettuce seeds to the top of whatever material you put in there to hold the seed (in the hot summer months, use romaine, red lettuce or butter crunch seeds) and then put the jug somewhere it will get some light and wait about a month. When all the water is gone out of the jug the lettuce is ready to eat.
This sounds like something I'd really like to try, even though I have a garden. Sounds like the hydroponic garden would be less vulnerable to slugs and snails.

I'm having a bit of a problem picturing the jug above. Is it a plastic gallon jug of milk, or the paper kind? Does the pot sit in the water, resting on the bottom of the jug? (but you say put the pot in the top of the jug) And you say put the jug in a box to keep the light out, but put the pot in the jug where it gets light. ?????

Would you run that by me again?

Hank
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Old 09-08-2008, 01:11 PM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
5,771 posts, read 9,290,922 times
Reputation: 2891
No weeding, no slugs! It is a great way to grow food. We had a milk jug lettuce demonstration/ pot luck at the local park last week and an more than thirty people showed up to see it. My neighbor and I were amazed!

Get a plastic milk jug and cut the top off of it to fit a net pot. I suppose if you don't have a net pot you could use a yogurt container which had a lot of holes poked in it. A yogurt container is a bit bigger than a net pot, but it would probably still work. Cut the milk jug so you can set this "net" container in where the neck of the jug was. The edge of the "net pot" will stick up higher than the milk jug but that's okay. You want the water in the jug to fill inside the "net". Do something to keep the light off where the plant roots will be. Put a teaspoon of hydroponic fertilizer in the jug and stir. Put the net pot in the top of the jug and fill the "net" with cotton wool, polyester wool, coconut fiber, an oasis cube, a bit of sponge, basically something to soak up moisture and hold the seed above water yet be moist. Put up to three lettuce seeds on the top of whatever you have put in the net pot and set the whole thing somewhere it will get some sun. That's about it. Eat the lettuce either by harvesting the whole thing at once or pinch off leaves from the bottom and leave the top growing. It will eventually go to seed and then you can harvest the seeds for the next plantings. Save on buying more seeds. During summer months, plant "butter crunch", romaine or red leafed varieties, during the winter months, Manoa or other "migonette" types can be planted as well as the other loose leaf varieties.

Personally, I like to use the big metal coffee cans since those are already light proof. I set a small forestry tube (long skinny planting tube) into the plastic coffee can lid and cover that with aluminum foil. I usually use bits of torn up stuffed toys since I save the stuffing when the dogs take one apart. The coffee cans will eventually rust through, but by then I have another can available to use.

We have a person in Hilo who imports large quantities of the fertilizer and net pots and then resells them to us in smaller quantities, but the supplies come from: Hydroponics Green House Hydroponics Gardening Supplies Hydroponics Garden Supplies,
Here's the net pots: Germination Supplies
and the fertilizer - we use the "hobby formula" 10-8-22 with "micro-nutrients" Hobby Formula 10-8-22

We are starting to look into using worm castings or chicken manure as fertilizer so we won't have to buy the fertilizer but so far we haven't gotten that worked out yet.
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Old 09-09-2008, 06:07 AM
 
Location: Dublin, Ohio
349 posts, read 410,824 times
Reputation: 298
Default Google is your friend.......

Google square foot gardening, container gardening and hydroponic gardening. There is a lot of information available on each subject.

Mickey
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