U.S. CitiesCity-Data Forum Index
Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Hawaii
 [Register]
Please register to participate in our discussions with 1.5 million other members - it's free and quick! Some forums can only be seen by registered members. After you create your account, you'll be able to customize options and access all our 15,000 new posts/day with fewer ads.
Jump to a detailed profile or search
site with Google Custom Search

Search Forums  (Advanced)
Business Search - 14 Million verified businesses
Search for:  near: 
 
Old 10-14-2009, 08:45 PM
 
10 posts, read 38,482 times
Reputation: 18

Advertisements

What are the pluses and minuses to building on slab versus up high (eight to ten foot) post and piers? I'm aware of some of them but would like to hear from people who have actually done it.

How much more of an expense is the latter and does anyone have experience with a poured concrete/rebarb mold technique which is supposed to be solid and relatively inexpensive, but the name of which escapes me at the moment.

If so, how did it work out?

Thanks in advance!
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message

 
Old 10-14-2009, 11:25 PM
 
Location: Hawaii-Puna District
3,755 posts, read 5,903,914 times
Reputation: 2311
Keeping yourself up in the air lets the breezes in. If you don't want AC, it can make a huge difference for you.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-14-2009, 11:48 PM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
6,000 posts, read 9,808,891 times
Reputation: 3218
If it is a house you are going to live in, concrete is really hard on your feet, knees and ankles. A lot of folks like the post and pier for ease of pipes maintenance as well as additional storage space under the house. I've been doing drafting in Hawaii for several decades and folks seem to prefer post and pier about three to one.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-15-2009, 12:44 PM
 
Location: Pahoa Hawaii
888 posts, read 2,766,601 times
Reputation: 652
Regarding the difference in costs, I've heard in recent years the price of concrete & installation here has risen so much that it's pretty much a wash between the two methods, unless you wanted a slab under post and pier, which would be definitely higher priced. A p&p house doesn't necessarily have to be high off the ground, my main house is on 3 ft. piers. Much easier on the feet than a slab, and fewer bugs. Slab floors are notorious for attracting ants and centipedes.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-15-2009, 11:51 PM
 
253 posts, read 641,592 times
Reputation: 100
Quote:
Originally Posted by leilaniguy View Post
...Slab floors are notorious for attracting ants and centipedes.
Completely agree.

And in a severe earthquake, a properly built p&p will withstand much better and if you do have plumbing breaks they'll be accessible and not inside concrete.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-17-2009, 10:17 PM
 
187 posts, read 332,713 times
Reputation: 288
Slab on grade

Advantages
-steps not necessary, depending on surrounding grading

Disadvantages
-concrete slab absorbs heat from the ground
-high labor cost to create formwork


Post on Pier

Advantages
-Passive cooling, cool air pulls up from under the floor deck, decreasing need for A/C use & $$$$$.
-Reduce chances from crawling bugs from entering house, especially ground termites
-no concern from flooding
-cheaper if land is sloped, less cost on earthwork.

Disadvantages
-need for steps, inconvienent for seniors and handicapped
-creaking sounds in flooring, unless you pay for larger floor beams

Most people prefer slab on grade because they don't have to go up and down steps everytime they go in or out of houses. But in my experience in house designs designing for passive cooling (designing for cool indoor temperature without using A/C) post on pier is better.

Suggest instead of using traditional post & pier, look into sonotubes, which are like gigantic cardboard toilet paper rolls that are used for formwork. Sonotubes are much faster and cheaper to build up the posts and you set your anchorbolts and beams on top of it. Don't need to go higher than 30" - 36" above grade based on County code, which I think is 30" minimum.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-18-2009, 11:02 PM
 
10 posts, read 38,482 times
Reputation: 18
Default re: Slab vs. Post and pier.

Thank you for your replies!

I believe the rolled cardboard-like tubes one poster mentioned was what I was referring to in my original post (I was way off!). Can one go up 8 to 10 feet with those?
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
 
Old 10-19-2009, 01:49 PM
 
Location: Moku Nui, Hawaii
6,000 posts, read 9,808,891 times
Reputation: 3218
I've seen them that tall, there's some sheer (sideways movement) bracing factors to be considered when building post and pier that tall.

If you have a sloped lot, you can have one edge of the post and pier platform at grade level and the rest of it above grade. That lets you walk into the house without stairs and still gives you the benefits of post and pier.
Reply With Quote Quick reply to this message
Please register to post and access all features of our very popular forum. It is free and quick. Over $68,000 in prizes has already been given out to active posters on our forum. Additional giveaways are planned.

Detailed information about all U.S. cities, counties, and zip codes on our site: City-data.com.


Reply
Please update this thread with any new information or opinions. This open thread is still read by thousands of people, so we encourage all additional points of view.

Quick Reply
Message:


Options
X
Data:
Loading data...
Based on 2000-2011 data
Loading data...

123
Hide US histogram


Over $89,000 in prizes was already given out to active posters on our forum and additional giveaways are planned!

Go Back   City-Data Forum > U.S. Forums > Hawaii
Similar Threads

All times are GMT -6.

2005-2014, Advameg, Inc.

City-Data.com - Archive 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25 - Top