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Old 03-25-2012, 08:46 PM
 
Location: Bergen County, NJ
1,603 posts, read 3,321,292 times
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Did you call them and ask ?? lol !!
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Old 03-25-2012, 08:49 PM
 
Location: The Cascade Foothills
10,954 posts, read 7,680,163 times
Reputation: 6437
Quote:
Originally Posted by nimchimpsky View Post
I think it's at the time of applying.

Are you talking about SSI or SSDI? the rules are different for savings. I hadn't worked enough to qualify for SSDI but I qualified for SSI after I had less than 2 grand.
I'm never sure what the difference is but I think I have SSDI.
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Old 03-25-2012, 08:54 PM
 
10,452 posts, read 9,517,696 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinebar View Post
I'm never sure what the difference is but I think I have SSDI.
Completely different rules.

SSDI Is for disabled people that have been in the workforce x years (can't remember how many) or 2x years part-time, and consequently filed taxes for long enough to get benefits.

SSI is for disabled people who have contributed less than x years to the workforce, and therefore paid less in taxes. The monthly amount is much smaller and you have to be disabled AND broke.
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Old 03-25-2012, 08:56 PM
 
10,452 posts, read 9,517,696 times
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Also you apply for both through SSA.
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Old 03-25-2012, 08:58 PM
 
2,418 posts, read 6,384,499 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Cinebar View Post
When I applied, I was told that it would take around 90 days.

At the end of 90 days, I called them and they said I had been approved; for some reason, they hadn't gotten around to notifying me yet.

I was lucky. I didn't use an attorney and I was approved the first time I applied. I think one thing that helps is being very, very thorough. I remember it took me something like seven hours to fill out the on-line form because I was almost obsessive about listing every doctor and every appointment I had had. I was lucky in that I had just had my independent medical exam (it was a work injury) and I had all their documentation at my fingertips to get a lot of my information from.

The very next morning after I applied, I got a phone call from my local SSI office, wanting me to come in to sign the release form so they could get my records.

So, I guess my biggest advice would be to be sure you dot every 'i' and cross every 't' and to make sure, before you even sit down to get started, that you have everything you need in front of you in the way of information.
Cinebar,

So sorry to hear of your injury.

But Kudos to you for being so thorough in providing the necessary information.

You must have very caring physicians and responsive office staff treating you and providing the needed medical records in a prompt manner.

I would have loved to have had your case cross my desk.
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Old 03-25-2012, 09:04 PM
 
Location: The Cascade Foothills
10,954 posts, read 7,680,163 times
Reputation: 6437
Quote:
Originally Posted by nimchimpsky View Post
Completely different rules.

SSDI Is for disabled people that have been in the workforce x years (can't remember how many) or 2x years part-time, and consequently filed taxes for long enough to get benefits.

SSI is for disabled people who have contributed less than x years to the workforce, and therefore paid less in taxes. The monthly amount is much smaller and you have to be disabled AND broke.
Thanks for the clarification.

Quote:
Originally Posted by jerseyj View Post
Cinebar,

So sorry to hear of your injury.

But Kudos to you for being so thorough in providing the necessary information.

You must have very caring physicians and responsive office staff treating you and providing the needed medical records in a prompt manner.

I would have loved to have had your case cross my desk.
Thanks.

I think another thing that helped was that everything was so recent at the time of my application; in fact, I was still under treatment and physical therapy when I applied.
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Old 03-25-2012, 10:27 PM
 
2,418 posts, read 6,384,499 times
Reputation: 1916
Quote:
Originally Posted by nimchimpsky View Post
I think it's at the time of applying.

Are you talking about SSI or SSDI? the rules are different for savings. I hadn't worked enough to qualify for SSDI but I qualified for SSI after I had less than 2 grand.
You are absolutely right. SSDI and SSI are completely different programs, funded differently, different considerations for assets etc.

SSDI is disability for people who have worked and paid into the SS system.

SSI is a Welfare programe paid into by people who work and support those who are less fortunate. That is why SSI applicants can not have certain assets (like more than 2K in the bank). They, now, can have houses and cars but can not have cash assets.

The criteria for being determined disabled is the same for both SSDI and SSI, this is a Federally determined criteria, managed by State workers.

BTW, visual impairments, usually, are awarded more monthly benefits than other disabilities.
Never understood that rule either.
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Old 03-25-2012, 11:11 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,672 posts, read 66,828,165 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by nimchimpsky View Post
Completely different rules.

SSDI Is for disabled people that have been in the workforce x years (can't remember how many) or 2x years part-time, and consequently filed taxes for long enough to get benefits.

SSI is for disabled people who have contributed less than x years to the workforce, and therefore paid less in taxes. The monthly amount is much smaller and you have to be disabled AND broke.
Right. SSI is for people who do not qualify for SS retirement due to insufficient work and earnings history. If you have no money and you are due a couple of years retroactive cumulative monthly benefits, they will just pay you $2,000 of the back pay, and dole it out $2,000 at a time a couple of times a year, or whenever you tell them you need it, but they won't give you any more if you have over $2,000 bank balance.

Both are approved and administered by Social Security, and the process of applying and being declined and going to a lawyer is basically the same, and when you're found to be disabled, they decide which you are eligible to receive.

SSDI (disability) is earned benefits that you paid for when you were working. SSI is just a handout to disabled people who have no SSDI eligibility and cannot earn any money. They don't hand it out unless you need it.
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Old 03-26-2012, 07:52 AM
 
10,452 posts, read 9,517,696 times
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Really? They just denied me outright till I had less than $2,000 (which was easy cause I only had $2050) so by the time I reapplied I was already well under the $2,000 limit.
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Old 03-26-2012, 07:57 AM
 
10,452 posts, read 9,517,696 times
Reputation: 12486
Quote:
Originally Posted by jerseyj View Post
You are absolutely right. SSDI and SSI are completely different programs, funded differently, different considerations for assets etc.

SSDI is disability for people who have worked and paid into the SS system.

SSI is a Welfare programe paid into by people who work and support those who are less fortunate. That is why SSI applicants can not have certain assets (like more than 2K in the bank). They, now, can have houses and cars but can not have cash assets.

The criteria for being determined disabled is the same for both SSDI and SSI, this is a Federally determined criteria, managed by State workers.

BTW, visual impairments, usually, are awarded more monthly benefits than other disabilities.
Never understood that rule either.
Blind and disabled are two separate categories for God knows what reason. I was considered disabled cause blindness isn't my only disability but I got the full possible amount (the blind amount).

Total blindness, total deafness, amputation, and I think some other disabilities are accepted with such high rates that some states give preemptive disability, where they start sending checks before the official medical decision is made, cause they're sure it will be approved.

Partial blindness or deafness can be more complicated cause the medical team has to determine if your vision/hearing loss is significant enough to be considered disabled.
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