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Old 08-26-2018, 12:02 PM
 
29 posts, read 24,131 times
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Directly from the AARP/UHC medicare supplement application:

Important Disclosures

AARP endorses the AARP Medicare Supplement Insurance Plans, insured by UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company. UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company pays royalty fees to AARP for the use of its intellectual property. These fees are used for the general purposes of AARP. AARP and its affiliates are not insurers. AARP does not employ or endorse agents, brokers or producers.

You must be an AARP member to enroll in an AARP Medicare Supplement Plan.
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Old 08-27-2018, 07:32 PM
 
8,528 posts, read 5,014,749 times
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Okay...here's the deal! I spoke with both AARP and United Healthcare today.

There is no discount in getting Medicare through AARP. When you buy a UHC supplemental plan initially, as a new customer, you MUST do so through AARP. That's because they have a business agreement. AARP gets your membership fee & a new member, and handles the gathering of initial info or whatever, and endorses UHC. In return, UHC carries AARP's logo on its paperwork or something. AARP doesn't actually handle your application or enrollment. It hands you over to UHC for that.

After you do the first, initial year application for a UHC supp. plan, you do not need to be an AARP member for renewals. AARP's involvement at that point is over. (I was speaking to the UHC agent regarding Medigap, so didn't ask if you needed to go through AARP if you changed from a diff. supp plan to Medigap; there are some restrictions on getting a Medigap plan.)

For buying Medigap at this stage of the game (early enrollment, initial year), you get a 36% discount. The quotes I saw for Plans F and G are the discounted premiums. Those prices will go up 3% a year, until the discount is gone by age 77. (I assume it's 3% over and above the regular increases.)
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Old 09-27-2018, 05:50 AM
 
Location: Cushing OK
14,545 posts, read 18,923,161 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
Okay...here's the deal! I spoke with both AARP and United Healthcare today.

There is no discount in getting Medicare through AARP. When you buy a UHC supplemental plan initially, as a new customer, you MUST do so through AARP. That's because they have a business agreement. AARP gets your membership fee & a new member, and handles the gathering of initial info or whatever, and endorses UHC. In return, UHC carries AARP's logo on its paperwork or something. AARP doesn't actually handle your application or enrollment. It hands you over to UHC for that.

After you do the first, initial year application for a UHC supp. plan, you do not need to be an AARP member for renewals. AARP's involvement at that point is over. (I was speaking to the UHC agent regarding Medigap, so didn't ask if you needed to go through AARP if you changed from a diff. supp plan to Medigap; there are some restrictions on getting a Medigap plan.)

For buying Medigap at this stage of the game (early enrollment, initial year), you get a 36% discount. The quotes I saw for Plans F and G are the discounted premiums. Those prices will go up 3% a year, until the discount is gone by age 77. (I assume it's 3% over and above the regular increases.)
Thanks for the information. I did sign up for AARP, but didn't pick anything yet. Some take meds and they work as expected, and can be given a bottle and its does its job. Then there are those of us who don't absorbe drugs right, and often say no. We get a sample, try it in small doses first and see if it reacts and if it does so negatively, do not go beyond that. You can't tell what its going to do if your body can break it down. I had my ostomy done long ago and learned soon to beware of this so have patience with doctors about this, but still don't just take the pills and hope. One doctor called me, with scorn, a bad patient. Smiled back at him. So I'll try a small sample, maybe five pills, and if they don't do it then I didn't waste money on a big bottle. I wonder how the plans look at that.


There is a big list too, as the left over damage has changed and got worse. I have a LOT of respect for some doctor or medical person who does listen and works with you. But I often find I can use botanicals and homeopathic medicines with no problems. They work in a different way, and are much less strong, and work well for many. And the side effects of the pharma pills are missing. This doesn't work for everyone but sure does for me.


So, when I do look for a doctor, I will ask if they use and approve of botanical and homeopathic medicines over pharma, and take a pass on someone who disapprves. Here, one of the visiting nurses actually ask about the stuff I used and what it did, and was planning to investigate several. But a lot of RN's are too deeply glued to pharma.



I've done more reseach too. I've found that many mean no doctor visit. My dream is a doctor who primarily uses homeopathic if the patient chooses them.


Hopefully the batch around now will contain some match for me. Won't change my choice or needs though.

Last edited by nightbird47; 09-27-2018 at 07:00 AM..
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Old 09-27-2018, 04:27 PM
 
5,066 posts, read 5,397,811 times
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A friend who will be retiring in a few months says she called AARP to get a quote on Plan F for herself and was quoted around 300.00 monthly. She is in good health, no meds. I was quite surprised at this and now wonder... how do some on here get a 144.00 quote and she gets 300.00? And supposedly for the same plan, F.
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Old 09-27-2018, 04:56 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
23,547 posts, read 50,140,471 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brava4 View Post
A friend who will be retiring in a few months says she called AARP to get a quote on Plan F for herself and was quoted around 300.00 monthly. She is in good health, no meds. I was quite surprised at this and now wonder... how do some on here get a 144.00 quote and she gets 300.00? And supposedly for the same plan, F.
Depends on age and state. Medical costs are regional. Example - premiums in NY state are much higher than those in the south.

Best way to get an accurate quote - use this link:

https://www.uhcmedicaresolutions.com...ent-plans.html

Your friend should be looking at Plan G - which only requires she pay $183 Part B deductible. Plan F won't be available to new enrollees beginning in 2020, anyway, and it's likely those already on F will be experiencing higher percentage premium increases as the risk pool for the F plans become older and sicker.

Right now, for me in WI, at age 76, the above link quotes me $277.89.

If I choose the basic plan with $20 copays and which does not pay the $183 Part B deductible, my monthly rate is reduced to $187.44. Big difference - $90/mo.

Since I rarely doctor, this plan makes sense for me. Probably would save $700 year.

Actually, since I'm healthy, I would be looking at a high deductible Plan F - for an annual premium of about $700/year for a 66 y/o. Medicare pays its 80% after the $183 Part B deductible, I pay the 20% up to $2,260. Thereafter, Medigap pays 100%.

AARP UHC does not offer a high deductible plan in any state.

Fwiw, my actual Medicare medical costs this year so far amount to $165.83. Broke a small bone in my ankle - healed within weeks. Two office visits, two X-rays - total Medicare allowed charges $165.83, which is not even the $183 Part B deductible. I have a zero premium Medicare Medical Savings Account (a form of an Advantage plan not available in most states) - into which was deposited this year $2,400 (deposit can change annually). From this account, I paid the $165, plus chiropractor, dentist and other 'qualified' medical expenses. What isn't spent carries forward to next year. I can see any Medicare doctor anywhere. This plan should be made available everywhere.

https://www.securityhealth.org/find-...re-saver---msa

Last edited by Ariadne22; 09-27-2018 at 05:20 PM..
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Old 09-27-2018, 05:58 PM
 
8,528 posts, read 5,014,749 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by brava4 View Post
A friend who will be retiring in a few months says she called AARP to get a quote on Plan F for herself and was quoted around 300.00 monthly. She is in good health, no meds. I was quite surprised at this and now wonder... how do some on here get a 144.00 quote and she gets 300.00? And supposedly for the same plan, F.
It depends on where you live, just like any insurance. Health insurance, car insurance, homeowner's insurance. If there are a lot of claims where someone lives, those premiums will be higher.

I live in a hurricane zone, so our homeowner's insurance is DOUBLE what I paid in Dallas, TX. My car ins. is significantly higher, too, since hurricanes & flooding cause car damage. Our health ins. is a tad high, since the obesity rate is high here, and the lifestyle...a lot of health claims.

However, the Medicare rates here seem average. I suspect that many of the unhealthy people here die before they get into drawn-out expensive conditions.

UNH Medigap Plan F was quoted as $144/mo. for me.

Are yu SURE your friend got a quote for $300 ONLY for Medigap Plan F? Or did she add the Part B to it, since she has to pay that, too? That would make it about $300, so I am thinking that's what her $300 cost is for.

For me, Part B ($134) + Medigap Plan F ($144) = $278. I then have to add Part D, which will take it to about $310.
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Old 09-27-2018, 07:35 PM
 
5,066 posts, read 5,397,811 times
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Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
It depends on where you live, just like any insurance. Health insurance, car insurance, homeowner's insurance. If there are a lot of claims where someone lives, those premiums will be higher.

I live in a hurricane zone, so our homeowner's insurance is DOUBLE what I paid in Dallas, TX. My car ins. is significantly higher, too, since hurricanes & flooding cause car damage. Our health ins. is a tad high, since the obesity rate is high here, and the lifestyle...a lot of health claims.

However, the Medicare rates here seem average. I suspect that many of the unhealthy people here die before they get into drawn-out expensive conditions.

UNH Medigap Plan F was quoted as $144/mo. for me.

Are yu SURE your friend got a quote for $300 ONLY for Medigap Plan F? Or did she add the Part B to it, since she has to pay that, too? That would make it about $300, so I am thinking that's what her $300 cost is for.

For me, Part B ($134) + Medigap Plan F ($144) = $278. I then have to add Part D, which will take it to about $310.


Thanks, for the details. My friend lives in Md., Montgomery County, expensive part of Md. Anyway, I will ask her for more details. She seems to want plans where EVERYTHING is covered and she doesn't have to pay ANYTHING, co-pays...nothing.
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Old 09-27-2018, 07:39 PM
 
8,528 posts, read 5,014,749 times
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Someone posted a rep to me w/o identification, saying Medigap Plan F costs her $260/month, even though she has no history of medical bills.

Hmmmm.... not sure what the takeaway on that is supposed to be. But if your cost is $260/mo for Plan F, then that is what it costs in your geographical area, IF you applied during the FIRST enrollment period you were eligible for it. After that, then they will take the insured's medical history into consideration, which means they can deny coverage or charge more for it.

So that's an advantage of early signing up for Medigap Plan F...your medical history plays no part in the cost. It's the claims history in the AREA. The ins co wants to make a certain profit, so it calculates how much it probably will have to spend on claims in the AREA, then adds its profit on top of that. If your area has low claims, the premium will be lower.

This is my understanding from what they told me and what I've read.
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Old 09-27-2018, 07:47 PM
 
Location: Avignon, France
9,657 posts, read 5,391,952 times
Reputation: 24363
Quote:
Originally Posted by brava4 View Post
A friend who will be retiring in a few months says she called AARP to get a quote on Plan F for herself and was quoted around 300.00 monthly. She is in good health, no meds. I was quite surprised at this and now wonder... how do some on here get a 144.00 quote and she gets 300.00? And supposedly for the same plan, F.
How old is your friend? My friend was paying 269.99 a month ( also plan F) and when she turned 65 it went down to 144.00 A month. ( she was on SSDI precious to her 65th b-day.)
I help her and when I called UHC ... I was told that her turning 65 is why her policy went down.
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Old 09-27-2018, 07:47 PM
 
5,066 posts, read 5,397,811 times
Reputation: 11538
Quote:
Originally Posted by bpollen View Post
Someone posted a rep to me w/o identification, saying Medigap Plan F costs her $260/month, even though she has no history of medical bills.

Hmmmm.... not sure what the takeaway on that is supposed to be. But if your cost is $260/mo for Plan F, then that is what it costs in your geographical area, IF you applied during the FIRST enrollment period you were eligible for it. After that, then they will take the insured's medical history into consideration, which means they can deny coverage or charge more for it.

So that's an advantage of early signing up for Medigap Plan F...your medical history plays no part in the cost. It's the claims history in the AREA. The ins co wants to make a certain profit, so it calculates how much it probably will have to spend on claims in the AREA, then adds its profit on top of that. If your area has low claims, the premium will be lower.

This is my understanding from what they told me and what I've read.


What do you mean by applying late? Late in age, older than FRA? Or late in the year of FRA? Thanks.
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