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Old 10-06-2018, 02:19 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
23,578 posts, read 50,266,725 times
Reputation: 18237

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Quote:
Originally Posted by roche714 View Post
for people that are paying 144.00 for UHC supplement,what state are you in.Im in NY and i signed up for UHC plan g and it is 294.00..does that sound right??
Certain areas of New York have notoriously high premiums. Premium is right for a Plan F if you live in Long Island or NYC proper per this:

https://www.dfs.ny.gov/consumer/medplan/medplanf.htm

But a Plan G reduces that premium to $264.50, per this;

https://www.dfs.ny.gov/consumer/medplan/medplang.htm

Seriously consider switching to a high-deductible F which has a $2,240 deductible for your 20% share of Medicare expenses. Medicare still pays its 80% after you satisfy the $183 Part B deductible. Premium for the HD-F is $93/mo. w/Humana, Humana includes a gym membership - AND - you're only paying between premium of $1,117.08 v. current $3,528.

Worst case cost-benefit analysis, you're still ahead with the HD-F.
$1117+$2,240=$3,350 v. the $3,528 you're paying now.
Further, if you don't want the gym membership, there are other lower-priced HD-F's available, as well:

https://www.dfs.ny.gov/consumer/medplan/medplanp.htm

You'd have to encounter serious illness to pay that $2,240 deductible each year as Medicare copays are minuscule. Mathjak on this board lives in Queens - and both he and his wife have had the HD-F for years. If you're healthy, you'll be way ahead with the HD-F.

General link which leads to NY rates by location for all plans:

https://www.dfs.ny.gov/consumer/caremain.htm#tables
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Old 10-06-2018, 02:30 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
23,578 posts, read 50,266,725 times
Reputation: 18237
Quote:
Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
We had AARP plan F, until they dropped our local hospitals, so we went to N. The premiums put a strain on our budget, but it has been a bad health year for us, and the cost has more than paid for itself.

We will shop around, but it won’t surprise me if we stick with what we have.
Because AARP UHC is community-rated in most states, the premiums are slightly higher than attained-age rated plans. So, if you shop around you may find a "cheaper" plan - for now - but as you age premium increases for attained-age will be higher and continue to increase. UHC community-rated plans halt increases due to age when you reach age 77. Thereafter, increases are related to medical costs in your locale.

My sister, age 69, is currently paying $204/mo. for an Aetna F - attained-age. Same Plan F w/UHC would be $217 today. Not much difference at all. When she first enrolled in Aetna three years ago, her premium started out at $142. Because her health has been better of late, I've suggested she look into AARP UHC, as eventually premiums for the attained-age Aetna plan will outstrip the community-rated AARP UHC.

Last edited by Ariadne22; 10-06-2018 at 03:43 PM..
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Old 10-07-2018, 05:16 PM
 
Location: 5,400 feet
3,602 posts, read 3,193,550 times
Reputation: 5235
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariadne22 View Post
Because AARP UHC is community-rated in most states, the premiums are slightly higher than attained-age rated plans. So, if you shop around you may find a "cheaper" plan - for now - but as you age premium increases for attained-age will be higher and continue to increase. UHC community-rated plans halt increases due to age when you reach age 77. Thereafter, increases are related to medical costs in your locale.

My sister, age 69, is currently paying $204/mo. for an Aetna F - attained-age. Same Plan F w/UHC would be $217 today. Not much difference at all. When she first enrolled in Aetna three years ago, her premium started out at $142. Because her health has been better of late, I've suggested she look into AARP UHC, as eventually premiums for the attained-age Aetna plan will outstrip the community-rated AARP UHC.

My wife and I are 70 & 71 and have had the Plan F w/UHC since I turned 65. We pay $171/mo each, going up to about $180 next year.


Als, when we first signed up we were told by the agent that one had to be an AARP member when signing up but it was not necessary for renewal. I've not tested that.
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Old 10-07-2018, 10:12 PM
 
Location: Wisconsin
23,578 posts, read 50,266,725 times
Reputation: 18237
Quote:
Originally Posted by jiminnm View Post
My wife and I are 70 & 71 and have had the Plan F w/UHC since I turned 65. We pay $171/mo each, going up to about $180 next year.
Each of you gets a 5% household discount because there are two of you, so that helps. Also, rates in WI tend to be higher than other areas - especially the south and west. You're in New Mexico, I believe - lower rates there.
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Old 10-12-2018, 06:48 PM
 
86,029 posts, read 83,554,208 times
Reputation: 61785
Quote:
Originally Posted by Ariadne22 View Post
Certain areas of New York have notoriously high premiums. Premium is right for a Plan F if you live in Long Island or NYC proper per this:

https://www.dfs.ny.gov/consumer/medplan/medplanf.htm

But a Plan G reduces that premium to $264.50, per this;

https://www.dfs.ny.gov/consumer/medplan/medplang.htm

Seriously consider switching to a high-deductible F which has a $2,240 deductible for your 20% share of Medicare expenses. Medicare still pays its 80% after you satisfy the $183 Part B deductible. Premium for the HD-F is $93/mo. w/Humana, Humana includes a gym membership - AND - you're only paying between premium of $1,117.08 v. current $3,528.

Worst case cost-benefit analysis, you're still ahead with the HD-F.
$1117+$2,240=$3,350 v. the $3,528 you're paying now.
Further, if you don't want the gym membership, there are other lower-priced HD-F's available, as well:

https://www.dfs.ny.gov/consumer/medplan/medplanp.htm

You'd have to encounter serious illness to pay that $2,240 deductible each year as Medicare copays are minuscule. Mathjak on this board lives in Queens - and both he and his wife have had the HD-F for years. If you're healthy, you'll be way ahead with the HD-F.

General link which leads to NY rates by location for all plans


https://www.dfs.ny.gov/consumer/caremain.htm#tables
Yep our high deductible f plan is a steal . We pay 93 a month and it covers the 40 a month we were paying for my gym
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Old 12-03-2018, 11:43 PM
 
8,531 posts, read 5,039,764 times
Reputation: 18191
Quote:
Originally Posted by jaminhealth View Post
I never bought into the Medicare supplement and I've had Medicare now for 15 yrs. Things have worked out fine for me...I had one surgery and worked out a payment plan to make up what Medicare didn't pay, the 20% of approved charges.

I often think the more insurance one buys the higher all charges are. Just my theory on it all.

And I had one yr of AARP membership and that was enough for me.

Insurance world is full of fear and push to BUY more and more.

My real health insurance are my supplements that keep me healthy and that's where I'd rather put my money than in doctors and pharma's hands. And yes there are things that happen and that's where my Medicare is so good and doctors work with patients if they need help.
There's some truth to that, I think. I'm in excellent health. One thing I do is stay away from medications and doctors. But I'm able to stay away from them because I'm healthy.

I think it's the fear of what could happen and the knowledge that a few medical problems or injuries and cancer could wipe out your retirement account that gives a person a good reason to spend a reasonable amount of money for protection.

One thing that is different about the senior years is that it is certain the body will fail, and things will go wrong. If we're lucky, whatever goes wrong will happen at the time we just drop down dead. But most of us, particularly women, start to fall apart.

The ins. cos. have it worked out that if you wait until you're too old to buy their insurance, they'll charge you a large premium, if they take you at all. So anyone who might want it, has to buy it when they are younger. From an ins. co.'s point of view, the older someone is, the more likely they'll have to pay high claims. They need a profit, so they'll charge a lot. If you're younger when yu get it, they'll get that profit over your younger years, when it's not as likely you'll have big claims.

It's a dilemma.
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