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Old 06-20-2010, 05:55 AM
 
Location: NYC
2,296 posts, read 4,513,973 times
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My doctor and nutritionist mentioned that soy-derived products may not be good for women with histories of breast cancer in their families, as it could promote the growth of tumors. Has anyone else heard this? BTW, they said that soy in its raw form (i.e., edamame) was okay.

Last edited by queensgrl; 06-20-2010 at 06:13 AM..
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Old 06-20-2010, 11:04 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C.
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ALL soy product contain phyto (plant derived) oestrogen's, raw soy would be included in this. Eating soy once in a while while not cause problems. The trouble is that some people (men and women) think that soy is a viable replacement for animal protein and consume it very often causing a dangerous increase in oestrogen thereby lowering the testosterone balance.

Soy oil is derived with the use of a solvent called hexane and some of this dangerous carcinogen is found in trace amounts in the final product. Solvent consumption damages DNA and is known to cause cancer.

P.S. Soy is very high in copper which competes with zinc for absorption so men should really stay away from soy (and other high copper foods) as zinc is needed for production of healthy sperm.

and... soy is high in salicylates so some may just be allergic.
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Old 06-20-2010, 11:14 AM
 
Location: 3814′45″N 12237′53″W
4,152 posts, read 9,582,386 times
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You need to read the labels on everything now adays since about 90% of your average grocery store shelves are filled with corn and or soy derivative products....not easy to have soy or corn once in awhile if you are consuming the regular stuff.
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Old 06-20-2010, 11:19 AM
 
Location: Houston, TX
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bellalunatic View Post
You need to read the labels on everything now adays since about 90% of your average grocery store shelves are filled with corn and or soy derivative products....not easy to have soy or corn once in awhile if you are consuming the regular stuff.
Not easy, but it can be done. About the only things without soy are fresh produce, fresh meat, and the bertolli and butoni frozen dinners. The hardest thing is even if you find something without it, you need to keep rechecking the labels to make sure the company didn't change the ingredients. Some companies are being nice and adding soy to the list of allergins located at the bottom of the ingredients, but they don't always do it for every product.

Grocery shopping has gone from a quick 1/2 hour to an agonizing 1-2 hour ordeal. It seems like they put soy in darn near everything!
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Old 06-20-2010, 11:20 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by bellalunatic View Post
You need to read the labels on everything now adays since about 90% of your average grocery store shelves are filled with corn and or soy derivative products....not easy to have soy or corn once in awhile if you are consuming the regular stuff.
so true
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Old 06-20-2010, 11:22 AM
 
Location: Washington D.C.
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Quote:
Originally Posted by molochai2580 View Post
Not easy, but it can be done. About the only things without soy are fresh produce, fresh meat, and the bertolli and butoni frozen dinners. The hardest thing is even if you find something without it, you need to keep rechecking the labels to make sure the company didn't change the ingredients. Some companies are being nice and adding soy to the list of allergins located at the bottom of the ingredients, but they don't always do it for every product.

Grocery shopping has gone from a quick 1/2 hour to an agonizing 1-2 hour ordeal. It seems like they put soy in darn near everything!

haha yes, nowadays not only do I need my grocery list but I have to remember to bring my reading glasses.
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Old 06-20-2010, 11:28 AM
 
Location: N of citrus, S of decent corn
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This would only be an issue for those with ER+/PR+ breast cancer. Soy and other vegetables tend to make estrogen in the body, and this type of breast cancer is fed by estrogen.
This being said, I have had this type of breast cancer, and my oncologist, from a top cancer center, has never mentioned any concern about whether or not I consume soy.
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Old 06-20-2010, 11:48 AM
 
Location: Mostly in my head
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Originally Posted by gentlearts View Post
This would only be an issue for those with ER+/PR+ breast cancer. Soy and other vegetables tend to make estrogen in the body, and this type of breast cancer is fed by estrogen.
This being said, I have had this type of breast cancer, and my oncologist, from a top cancer center, has never mentioned any concern about whether or not I consume soy.
So maybe you need to ask him. This is an established finding, several years old.
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Old 06-20-2010, 12:34 PM
 
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As a post menopausal woman (surgical menopause age 42) I think is a good for me. There is zero history of breast cancer in the family, had and nursed two kids by the age of 30, and religiously have annual mammograms.

This has some points to consider on the other side {not a study or whatever just someone's opinions)
The Food Revolution

I think the balance probably is somewhere in the middle but like with all foods would prefer to eat more of the less processed forms of the food than most.
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Old 06-21-2010, 11:56 AM
 
Location: Georgia, USA
21,506 posts, read 26,116,900 times
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Actually there are two questions:

First, does eating soy cause breast cancer? There is no scientific evidence that it does. In fact, breast cancer rates in women eating traditional diets high in soy, since childhood, have lower breast cancer rates. And soy is not the only source of phytoestrogens; to completely eliminate them from the diet would be impossible. They are in nuts, certain oils, even coffee in very small amounts, for example.

Second, should women who have been treated for breast cancer avoid soy? A large study reported last year, done in China, included 5000 women treated for breast cancer with surgery. The women were asked about dietary soy as part of the study and divided into a group with lower soy intake (less than 5 grams per day) and a group with higher intake (over 15 grams per day). The women in the higher intake group actually had fewer breast cancer recurrences and deaths. The dietary intake of women in the USA on average is below that of the Chinese women in the low intake group in the study. The Chinese study was not a "randomized controlled" study: the women were not assigned to low intake vs. high intake groups before they were treated, but the results certainly suggest that soy does not increase the risk of recurrence and death in breast cancer patients.

How about soy if you take tamoxifen? Studies in mice are conflicting, but women are not mice! At least one human study suggests that the effects of medications for high blood pressure containing diuretics, age, and body weight have more effect on blood levels of tamoxifen than soy does. Another factor is that people vary in how much they produce of the enzymes that break tamoxifen down: some people do it faster than others.

Most women, even after menopause, are going to make enough natural estrogen to far outweigh the effects of soy. Fat can actually turn other hormones into estrogen. So the most beneficial thing to do is to lose weight if you need to. Unless you are allergic to soy, there is no need to go to extreme measures to avoid it. By severely restricting your diet, you could end up with deficiencies in other nutrients. If you are still concerned, you could avoid loading the diet with soy in the form of "protein" shakes and snacks and large amounts of tofu.

So, eat a well-balanced diet, decrease total calories and exercise to maintain an appropriate weight, and don't chase down every gram of soy!
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