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Old 11-22-2010, 11:14 AM
 
33,134 posts, read 39,067,107 times
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As a recent visual problem has left me unable to use both eyes at the same time it appears i'm going to have to get used to living with just one eye. Anyone have any personal experience with living with one eye?
How long does it take to get used to the condition? how long until you had the confidence to drive? Etc..
Thanks
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Old 11-22-2010, 06:31 PM
 
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I haven't lived physically with one eye, but I have had a lot of issues with my eyes teaming up and so on, and I only had residual vision in one eye for a long time (left eye was totally blind, right eye was partial). The main difference it causes is depth perception issues. You may need to find new cues for determining how close or far something is. You might also need to make small modifications like touching the bottle to the cup before pouring into a glass and depending on how good your brain is at picking up other cues for depth, playing ball games or doing activities that require depth perception may become a lot harder. There are a lot of stereoblind (zero depth perception) people out there, though, that make do just fine. Sorry I can't give any specific advice on driving, but my guess would be whenever you feel comfortable. Good luck!
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Old 11-22-2010, 07:06 PM
 
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I had a situation where one eye was nearsighted, the other far and it left me with no depth perception (the brain toggled between eyes depending on the distance I was looking at)

The irony was even though my right eye which was the one I could not see at a distance was my dominant eye, I could shoot a bow and arrow just fine right handed without using a sight....and that was shooting things like frisbees and fish. .... so I think I adjusted pretty well. And no issues with driving except for at nightime.

I am so used to zero depth perception it is not a big issue (though things are very vibrant, almost overwhelming when I do wear glasses!) but now I need a distance correction for the eye that was good at distances and, at 55, definitely need reading glasses for both eyes.
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Old 11-22-2010, 07:39 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
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I have almost no vision in one eye. Using that eye alone, I can hardly walk around, and it really has no function except maybe provide a little bit of depth perception. I lost it suddenly (ischemic optic neuropathy) and within a week or two, I stopped noticing it. It didn't affect driving, once I got used to it.

Your eyes have an amazing capacity to accommodate, whenever something interferes with the visual acuity. Within a couple of weeks, you will no longer be constantly conscious of the loss of vision.

I am legally blind with retinitis pigmentosa. My field of view at arms length is about 3 inches wide, and I can only see about 1/20 of the computer screen right now. But as my eye scans over it, my eye 'remembers' the whole screen and fools me into thinking I can see the whole thing. During the course of the day, I am rarely conscious of my vision loss, and the only time I think about my limited vision is when I'm looking for something that I have set down on the kitchen counter. It takes a long time to scan the whole counter until I find it. Otherwise my eye and brain think I see the whole normal view.

Last edited by jtur88; 11-22-2010 at 07:52 PM..
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Old 11-23-2010, 01:27 AM
 
33,134 posts, read 39,067,107 times
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JT you are making me feel like a woos for copping out of the guess this place game actually in my case the eye strain involved with intense visualization brings on headaches or vertigo,however watching tv isnt a problem.
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Old 11-23-2010, 11:20 PM
 
Location: Pennsylvania
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My husband lost his right eye and only has partial vision in the other eye. He does really well but has a problem with depth perception and driving at night. But he does drive during daylight hours. He cannot see in the dark so I have lotsa night lights around & light colored walls. It helps some.
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Old 11-24-2010, 02:18 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,523,609 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by jambo101 View Post
JT you are making me feel like a woos for copping out of the guess this place game actually in my case the eye strain involved with intense visualization brings on headaches or vertigo,however watching tv isnt a problem.
No, in fact I also found it difficult to scan through lots of images. Eyestrain is a serious issue, even for people with uncompromised vision, and it is wise to limit difficult viewing.

Poor vision and the need for glasses in western culture is a product of excessive close work. The human eye did not evolve for close work, and people who have never learned to read retain excellent eyesight well past middle age. Birdwatching in the third world, I've met people in their 50s and 60s who could see the field marks of birds as clearly and sharply with the naked eye as American adults can with 8x binoculars. They had never learned to read, and rarely concentrated on anything closer than arms length.

Chinese school children now are required, every hour or so, to turn away from their lessons and just look out the window for ten or fifteen minutes. They recognize the effects of continuous concentrated close work. The eye rests when focused at infinity.

You should take Lutein---my opthlamologist recommends it for everyone. I take 20 mg per day, which only costs about $4 a month if you order on line, but the preparations on pharmacy shelves are very expensive for much smaller dosage. I get mine from puritans pride.
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Old 11-25-2010, 02:12 AM
 
33,134 posts, read 39,067,107 times
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My Mom is trying to get me to take Lutein but when i suggested the product to my ophthalmologist he said that Lutein was a product for inner eye health and that my problem is with the muscles around the eye not functioning properly so Lutein would not be effective in my case, but thanks for the suggestion JT.
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Old 11-25-2010, 09:45 PM
 
Location: Victoria TX
42,668 posts, read 71,523,609 times
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When your vision is compromised, anything that helps your eyes in any way will be helpful. If you lose part of your vision from one cause, and you can find a way to improve the aspects that were not affected, you've gained something back. Just like wearing glasses. They won't help your eye muscles, but they still help your vision.
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Old 11-26-2010, 09:50 AM
 
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Is this Lutein an over the counter medication?
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