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Old 02-24-2011, 05:16 PM
 
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I don't know if this has been posted already (sorry if it has), but I thought it was worth passing along.

Quote:
Older people who walk quickly tend to live longer than those who slow way down as they age, found a new study. The findings do not mean that slow walkers are doomed to die early, the researchers warn. Nor will intentionally pushing yourself to hustle keep you young. Instead, the study suggests that, like blood pressure and cholesterol levels, the pace that you feel comfortable walking at can be a simple sign of your overall health.

In turn, a simple walking test could help doctors and patients make decisions about when to perform certain screening tests -- and when not to. "We are not saying that if you just go out and walk faster, you will live longer. Absolutely not," said Stephanie Studenski, a geriatrician at the University of Pittsburgh Medical Center and at the Veteran Affairs Pittsburgh Healthcare System. "We are saying your body selects a walking speed that is best for you based on the health of all your body systems."
You can read the rest here.
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Old 02-24-2011, 09:13 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
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Thanks for posting this. It is one further piece of epidemiological evidence that inactivity is very bad for us. After all, what could "cause" slower or faster walking speeds in older people? Certainly near the top of the list would be one's level of activity over time, meaning over a period of years. If we get less and less used to moving, we will move slower.

Recovery from surgery, for example, means (at least partly) recovery from forced inactivity. Following hernia surgery last August (I am 66) it took me 23 days to get back to the parameters of one of my normal work-out regimens. On day three after surgery I was back on the treadmill, but for a very short duration (21 min.) and at a very slow pace (3.0 mph), those parameters being set not ahead of time, but by my comfort level, as I was determined not to overdo and set back my recovery. Rather, the goal was to move and thereby speed my recovery. Every single day thereafter both the duration and the speed increased very slowly, reaching my normal walking speed of 4.6 mph on day 10, for one hour. The first jogging was on day 14, and I could only jog for 5 minutes! The time limitation was not due to any pain or discomfort in the incision area, but rather to deconditioning. It took a long time, about three weeks, to work up to jogging for 20 minutes.
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Old 02-25-2011, 07:51 AM
 
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The degree of arthritic pain I have at the moment governs my walking speed and that varies like the economy and has nothing to do with the rest of my health.MO
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Old 02-25-2011, 08:12 AM
miu
 
Location: MA/NH
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Good news since I've always been a fast walker. I'm one of the fastest walkers at work too.
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Old 02-25-2011, 10:11 AM
 
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Quote:
Originally Posted by qlty View Post
The degree of arthritic pain I have at the moment governs my walking speed and that varies like the economy and has nothing to do with the rest of my health.MO
I think what the authors are saying has merit, tho. And I don't think it's about the effects of short term injury. If you had ongoing arthritic pain it could slow you down, which means you won't get as much cardio, you won't burn as many calories, etc. Sort of like a cascade affect, which 'could' reflect overall health.
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Old 02-25-2011, 01:42 PM
 
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I'm not a good walker at all. My gait is not that smooth and it's hard for me to push the speed up. However, I can run a 10k comfortably at under 7 minutes per mile and a single mile in 5:30. Does this mean that I will die young? Bill Rodgers also said he didn't like walking that much and wasn't very good at it.
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Old 02-25-2011, 02:25 PM
 
Location: Los Angeles area
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Quote:
Originally Posted by TXRunner View Post
I'm not a good walker at all. My gait is not that smooth and it's hard for me to push the speed up. However, I can run a 10k comfortably at under 7 minutes per mile and a single mile in 5:30. Does this mean that I will die young? Bill Rodgers also said he didn't like walking that much and wasn't very good at it.
Logically, you are an exception because running trumps walking as exercise because of the greater intensity, intensity being one of the three main parameters of cardio-pulmonary-vascular exercise. (The other two are duration and frequency).

I am just the opposite; I walk easily, quite fast, and comfortably for long durations. But I have trouble running. But I do both anyway and just struggle with the running. (It takes me 10 minutes to run a mile - yes, I realize how pathetic that is even at 66, but it is better to be out there trying than to give up).
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Old 02-25-2011, 06:35 PM
 
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If speed is a measure I should have been dead 20 years ago.
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Old 02-25-2011, 06:38 PM
 
Location: SW Missouri
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Braunwyn View Post
I don't know if this has been posted already (sorry if it has), but I thought it was worth passing along.

You can read the rest here.
Interesting.

I would have thought that someone who does not let life "stress" him out i.e. a "stop and smell the roses" kind of person, would me much more likely to live a long life.

I am a very slow walker for no other reason than I really like to look at things, so I guess I am doomed. LOL

20yrsinBranson
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Old 02-25-2011, 07:19 PM
 
19,081 posts, read 21,194,953 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 20yrsinBranson View Post
Interesting.

I would have thought that someone who does not let life "stress" him out i.e. a "stop and smell the roses" kind of person, would me much more likely to live a long life.

I am a very slow walker for no other reason than I really like to look at things, so I guess I am doomed. LOL

20yrsinBranson
I'm getting the feeling that nobody is reading the article in its entirety. The way I'm understanding it is that it's not a matter of attitude, i.e., an ability to relax, enjoy life, etc, but a spark in your step vs a waddle.
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