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Old 02-28-2011, 11:20 PM
 
Location: Texas
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Bacteria in the human gut may not just be helping digest food but also could be exerting some level of control over the metabolic functions of other organs, like the liver, according to research published this week in the online journal mBio. These findings offer new understanding of the symbiotic relationship between humans and their gut microbes and how changes to the microbiota can impact overall health.

BTW, I've read other articles suggesting that, depending on what gut bacteria there is in a given individual, will determine how fat or how slim a person will be. It has been born out in rats or mice (not sure which critter they used). After writing one of the authors, he (or possibly it was someone on this board? I'ts been awhile). suggested caution in introducing certain bacteria humans at this stage.
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Old 03-01-2011, 09:08 AM
 
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They've been discovering over the last few years that the pounds of bacteria that reside in our intestines influence many different body systems including neurotransmitters in our brain as an example. Nope i take no antibacteria products or meds at all as i love all the trillions of lacto and bifido strains that inhabit my gut. I think i'll have me some kefir for breakfast now
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Old 03-01-2011, 07:18 PM
 
Location: Texas
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Yeah, I've thought this gut bacteria is pretty interesting stuff.

I did a search where I usually read science articles and read some of them this evening.
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Old 03-02-2011, 08:02 AM
 
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Ive been reading over the last couple years about how the gut bacteria (quadrillions) and parasites uniquely interact with our immune system that line our intestinal villi to reduce inflammation (Interleukins, Cytokines) as there are currently several large multiple sclerosis clinical trials giving Pinworm and Hookworm eggs to people with that disease and seeing at least in the early phase-I and II trials that it's benefiting them. Lol ... as one researcher had put it ''we should all play in and eat trace's amount of dirt for health and longevity''

Is cleanliness to blame for increasing allergies? - Science Daily

Parasite Infection May Benefit Multiple Sclerosis Patients - Science Daily
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Old 03-02-2011, 10:31 AM
 
Location: Texas
5,070 posts, read 8,785,511 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by 6 Foot 3 View Post
Ive been reading over the last couple years about how the gut bacteria (quadrillions) and parasites uniquely interact with our immune system that line our intestinal villi to reduce inflammation (Interleukins, Cytokines) as there are currently several large multiple sclerosis clinical trials giving Pinworm and Hookworm eggs to people with that disease and seeing at least in the early phase-I and II trials that it's benefiting them. Lol ... as one researcher had put it ''we should all play in and eat trace's amount of dirt for health and longevity''

Is cleanliness to blame for increasing allergies? - Science Daily

Parasite Infection May Benefit Multiple Sclerosis Patients - Science Daily
Hmmm. Problem is finding safe dirt, these days. Maybe out in the pasture on our old farm?
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Old 03-02-2011, 10:35 AM
 
1,543 posts, read 2,559,684 times
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Brian.Pearson View Post
Bacteria in the human gut may not just be helping digest food but also could be exerting some level of control over the metabolic functions of other organs, like the liver, according to research published this week in the online journal mBio. These findings offer new understanding of the symbiotic relationship between humans and their gut microbes and how changes to the microbiota can impact overall health.

BTW, I've read other articles suggesting that, depending on what gut bacteria there is in a given individual, will determine how fat or how slim a person will be. It has been born out in rats or mice (not sure which critter they used). After writing one of the authors, he (or possibly it was someone on this board? I'ts been awhile). suggested caution in introducing certain bacteria humans at this stage.
can't these bacteria change with our diet? So say a fat person looses a lot of weight and keeps it under control. Our bacteria will change according to that?
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Old 03-03-2011, 07:49 AM
 
13,140 posts, read 36,041,144 times
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Originally Posted by Brian.Pearson View Post
Hmmm. Problem is finding safe dirt, these days. Maybe out in the pasture on our old farm?
Or just take a good probiotic ... and infact because of this thread i just ordered several types of probiotic strains as i had forgotten about how beneficial they are for many aspects of health and longevity
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Old 03-03-2011, 12:42 PM
 
Location: Texas
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I'd like to know if there were some probiotics that a person wouldn't have to take on a regular basis.
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Old 03-04-2011, 08:06 AM
 
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I was reading in New Scientist magazine last year about a clinical study using a test called the Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy showing that kids with autism in this clinical study had a distinct chemical marker in their urine of certain strains of intestinal bacteria where as all the kids without autism didn't show this marker at all. It doesn't prove it one way or the other but non the less interesting to ponder.

Gut bacteria may contribute to autism - New Scientist Magazine

I wanted to add on here that the human body has around 10 trillion human cells (Eukaryotic) and yet we have some 100 trillion bacteria (Prokaryotic) that live on and inside us (intestinal tract) as we evolved needing the majority of ''good strains'' just to survive or we'd be dead without them. We even have bacteria that evolved millions of years ago that live inside each and evey cell in our body called the Mitochondria as these ancient bacteria produce ''ATP'' from our food sources that gives every cell the energy to live and not die in an instant.

Last edited by Six Foot Three; 03-04-2011 at 08:54 AM.. Reason: Changed Wording - 6 ft 3
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