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Old 03-20-2011, 03:23 AM
 
Location: Boca Raton, FL
711 posts, read 1,585,025 times
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Or rather, does a lack of the former imply a lack of the latter? I can pretty much ride anything on land (big coaster fan here) or air without suffering any kind of motion sickness, but I have never been on a large ship like a cruise liner. If I were to take a cruise, can I expect not to suffer seasickness?
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Old 03-20-2011, 11:26 AM
 
Location: Newport, Rhode Island
665 posts, read 1,476,793 times
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These Seabanz really work !

Motion Sickness Remedies
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Old 03-20-2011, 12:03 PM
 
Location: Manhattan, Ks
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You're probably less likely to get seasickness, but I wouldn't rule it out completely.
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Old 03-20-2011, 12:27 PM
 
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I suffer from both, but my teens can handle any amusement park ride while getting horribly seasick. They haven't gone on a cruise, but have gone deep sea fishing a couple of times. Dramamine helped them with the symptoms to some extent.

I have had people tell me that you don't notice the motion of a large cruise ship because of the stabilizers, but I am not willing to chance a vacation. I can get motion sickness just watching an IMAX movie, so I maybe a hard-core case.
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Old 03-20-2011, 12:32 PM
 
Location: In a house
13,258 posts, read 34,604,245 times
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They're related. Seasickness is a form of motion sickness. Motion sickness is the "broad term" for a bunch of different unpleasant experience with motion. Car sickness is also a form of motion sickness.

The thing with seasickness, is that often you can't tell that the boat is moving. But it is moving, and your conscious mind and inner ear balance centers are in conflict with each other, because your balance centers *do* know it's moving. When there's a conflict, sometimes you end up with symptoms of illness such as nausea, headache, lightheadedness, disorientation, etc. etc.

Anything involving gravity, motion, and/or accelleration can cause motion sickness in people who are prone to it.

I'm great on a boat; the movement is soothing and relaxing to me and I feel just as comfy paddling a canoe as I do on a super-cruise ship. Spinning amusement park rides though, I'm not so great with.
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Old 03-21-2011, 05:25 AM
 
Location: Tampa, FL
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On a really large cruise ship in calm seas, you won't even experience a sensation of motion the way you do on small ships. Seasickness is pretty rare on a big cruise ship in normal conditions. Now, if the seas kick up and the ship starts swaying more, then it can become sickening, but cruise ships go to great lengths to avoid conditions like that. You are much more likely to experience seasickness riding the little tenders from ship to shore than on the cruise ship itself. Ginger really does work by the way, so do those little patches you put behind your ear. Bring some stuff like that just in case but you probably won't need it. If you do feel seasick, go up on the deck if possible so you can see the horizon. When the messages from your eyes and inner ear synch up it will help a lot. Staying below deck in a closed cabin will only increase your misery, especially if it's a cheap cabin with no window.
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Old 03-21-2011, 10:51 AM
 
32,538 posts, read 29,325,866 times
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I would think you would be OK. Ever been on the T-Cups ride at Disneyland/world? My theory is if you can handle the maximum spin on the T-Cups you can handle anything.

I have one of those rock-guts. I've yet to meet an amusement park ride that made me turn away in fear, lol. I've been on a variety of boats/ships and have only been ill twice: Once was on a ferry in very choppy seas. (And oddly enough I'd been in much rougher water. That particular ride was up, down, up, down for about 90 minutes.) The other was in the depths of a hovercraft and I think it was the smell of the engines more than the motion. Got pretty queasy both times but didn't toss my cookies. I say go for it. Take the patches along if you're worried.
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Old 03-22-2011, 01:29 PM
 
Location: southwest TN
8,175 posts, read 14,253,018 times
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I grew up on boats - had my own for many years - never any hint of seasickness. Fast forward to adult years and years of increasing hearing loss. I start having episodes of vertigo. I experience my first air sickness; and finally a day at sea (it WAS rough - so rough in fact, the doors to outside were locked shut and there were bags in all the stairwells). Yup, seasick.

BTW, there is NO truth that the big ships do not rock. The one I got sick on was one of the biggest and newest in the Royal Caribbean line. It rocked so hard, the pools emptied themselves, anything loose was tied down. It's funny because everyone says Carnival is rocky. I've been on Carnival ships on the edge of a hurricane and didn't feel half the rocking that we had on RC.

I have an Rx for Antivert (meclizine) for whenever my ears get out of whack and I have a bout of vertigo. All ships I've been on have medicine available for motion sickness - often Bonine. You can purchase Dramamine or Waldram, regular or low-drowsy before you go and you probably won't have any issues.

Do NOT let a small matter like motion sickness keep you from cruising. It's a wonderful way to see new places and have a great time.

Quote:
Originally Posted by Mattie View Post
I suffer from both, but my teens can handle any amusement park ride while getting horribly seasick. They haven't gone on a cruise, but have gone deep sea fishing a couple of times. Dramamine helped them with the symptoms to some extent.

I have had people tell me that you don't notice the motion of a large cruise ship because of the stabilizers, but I am not willing to chance a vacation. I can get motion sickness just watching an IMAX movie, so I maybe a hard-core case.
Quote:
Originally Posted by AnonChick View Post
They're related. Seasickness is a form of motion sickness. Motion sickness is the "broad term" for a bunch of different unpleasant experience with motion. Car sickness is also a form of motion sickness.

The thing with seasickness, is that often you can't tell that the boat is moving. But it is moving, and your conscious mind and inner ear balance centers are in conflict with each other, because your balance centers *do* know it's moving. When there's a conflict, sometimes you end up with symptoms of illness such as nausea, headache, lightheadedness, disorientation, etc. etc.

Anything involving gravity, motion, and/or accelleration can cause motion sickness in people who are prone to it.

I'm great on a boat; the movement is soothing and relaxing to me and I feel just as comfy paddling a canoe as I do on a super-cruise ship. Spinning amusement park rides though, I'm not so great with.
Quote:
Originally Posted by DewDropInn View Post
I would think you would be OK. Ever been on the T-Cups ride at Disneyland/world? My theory is if you can handle the maximum spin on the T-Cups you can handle anything.

I have one of those rock-guts. I've yet to meet an amusement park ride that made me turn away in fear, lol. I've been on a variety of boats/ships and have only been ill twice: Once was on a ferry in very choppy seas. (And oddly enough I'd been in much rougher water. That particular ride was up, down, up, down for about 90 minutes.) The other was in the depths of a hovercraft and I think it was the smell of the engines more than the motion. Got pretty queasy both times but didn't toss my cookies. I say go for it. Take the patches along if you're worried.
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